Nation/World

Pages

Author Interviews
5:16 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

In 'Dallas 1963,' A City Of Rage, Seized By 'Civic Hysteria'

Dallas 1963, by Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis

Nearly half a century later, the date remains difficult for many to forget: Nov. 22, 1963, the day John F. Kennedy was assassinated. In grainy photographs and countless conspiracy theories, the day endures in our collective memory. What often gets submerged in these images and reports, though, is the story of the place that hosted Kennedy on that day, the city that saw his death firsthand: Dallas.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:03 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Americans Prefer Hemorrhoids And Cockroaches To Congress

he U.S. Capitol is seen on November 19, 2011 in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 12:26 pm

We've known for years that Congress — as a whole — is unpopular.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:53 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Obama Has A Tea Party Cousin — And He's Running For Senate

Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., and other senators rush to the floor for a vote in July. Roberts faces a 2014 primary challenge from a distant relative of President Obama's.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:14 pm

Another member of the Obama family wants to come to Washington. But don't expect the president to campaign for him.

Milton Wolf, a distant cousin of President Obama's, announced Tuesday he will run for the U.S. Senate in Kansas, challenging three-term Sen. Pat Roberts in the Republican primary.

There's some political distance between Wolf and his cousin in the White House, to put it mildly.

An outspoken critic of the president's health care law, Wolf writes a conservative column for the Washington Times and has made several appearances on Fox News.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:52 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Why Scientists Held Back Details On A Unique Botulinum Toxin

The botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph.
James Cavallini Science Source

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:51 pm

Scientists have discovered the first new form of botulinum toxin in over 40 years, but they're taking the unusual step of keeping key details about it secret.

That's because botulinum toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known. It causes botulism, and the newly identified form of it can't be neutralized by any available treatment.

Read more
Youth Radio
4:37 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

High Schools Struggle To Tackle Safety On The Football Field

Football practice at Castro Valley High School in California. Proper hitting technique requires players to keep their heads up to prevent neck injuries and concussions.
Brett Myers Youth Radio

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 6:41 pm

Read more
What Comes Next? Conversations On The Afterlife
4:37 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

A Philosopher's 'Afterlife': We May Die, But Others Live On

iStockphoto.com

Philosopher Samuel Scheffler doesn't believe in a traditional afterlife — that is, he doesn't think that a spirit or soul survives the body's physical death. But he does believe in another kind of afterlife: Regardless of what we think about our own life after death, Scheffler tells NPR's Robert Siegel, we all trust that others will continue to live after us. And, much like faith in a spiritual afterlife, that belief changes what we choose to do with our days on earth.

Read more
Book Reviews
4:37 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

A Coming Of Age Story For The (Ice) Ages

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. A new novel explores life on Earth tens of thousands of years ago. It's called "Shaman" by science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson. Our reviewer, Alan Cheuse, says it's worthy of a spot on the bookshelf between "The Inheritors" and "The Clan Of The Cave Bear."

Read more
The Two-Way
4:36 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Man Opens Fire On Federal Building In West Virginia

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 6:15 pm

Using an assault-type rifle, a man fired 15 to 20 shots at a federal building in Wheeling, W.Va. on Wednesday, the U.S. Marshals Service tells the AP.

Authorities said the suspect was killed by police during the assault.

The wire service reports:

"Chief deputy Mike Claxton of the Marshals Service in northern West Virginia says one officer was hurt by shattered glass inside the courthouse during Wednesday's shooting but no other injuries were reported.

Read more
The Checkout: Live
4:32 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Melissa Aldana Crash Trio: Live At Berklee

Melissa Aldana performs with her Crash Trio, including bassist Pablo Menares.
Kelly Davidson Courtesy of Berklee College Of Music

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 2:10 pm

The saxophonist Melissa Aldana, 24, came to the U.S. from Chile with little money and less command of English. But she did have some serious ability at the saxophone — her father is a saxophonist too — and thanks in part to a Berklee College of Music scholarship, has begun to carve out a career in the music. Since moving to New York, Aldana has already cut two albums for Inner Circle Music, the label founded by saxophonist Greg Osby, one of her mentors. And in winning the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition last month, she was given funds to record her next album.

Read more
Code Switch
3:39 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

In Los Angeles County, It's 'Bark And Hold' Vs. 'Find And Bite'

This dog holds the armor it has just ripped from its target until given the release command.
Mark Hayes iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:21 am

According to the Police Assessment Resource Center*, or PARC, far too many people in Los Angeles County are being bitten by police dogs — and the overwhelming majority of those victims are black and Latino.

In PARC's latest report, released on Monday: "Victims of the dog bites are almost universally African-American and Latino." And while the rates of bites of whites, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans have remained low over the past 8 years, "the percentage of apprehensions involving a dog bite has trebled in recent years."

Read more
It's All Politics
3:21 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Like The GOP, Boehner's Ohio Buddies Split On His Leadership

House Speaker John Boehner, accompanied by GOP Reps. Kevin McCarthy, Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Eric Cantor, spoke to the press Tuesday, as the partial government shutdown entered its second week.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:51 pm

Spirits were high when a posse of John Boehner's friends traveled from Ohio to the nation's capital to celebrate the longtime Republican congressman's elevation to House speaker in January 2011.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:18 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Even Mild Strokes Take A Toll On Quality Of Life

Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill., gets help entering the Capitol from Vice President Joe Biden (right) in January 2013, one year after suffering a stroke at age 52.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Having even a small stroke can be a scare. Some people recover well, while others struggle to talk, move or live as they did before.

Quality of life in the years after a stroke is something that's gotten surprisingly little attention, even though so-called quality-adjusted life years are a common measure for the cost-effectiveness of medical treatments.

Read more
NPR Story
3:16 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Ann Leary On Alcoholism And Keeping A Marriage Together

Ann Leary, author of "The Good House" and New York Times "Modern Love" columnist. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Author Ann Leary isn’t shy about mining her life for her writing.

In a New York Times column, she wrote about how her marriage to actor Denis Leary came to the brink of divorce, but that admitting their need to separate actually kept them together.

Read more
NPR Story
3:16 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

DA's Office Asks For DNA In Exchange For Dropped Charges

DNA Self-Collection Kit (Pelle Sten/flickr)

Prosecutors in Orange County, Calif., have taken the rare if not unique step of creating their own DNA database.

They’re asking for voluntary DNA swabs from people arrested for minor crimes such as shoplifting, in exchange for dropping charges.

The argument is that it could help authorities solve cold cases.

Experts and other district attorneys are taking note.

Read more
NPR Story
3:16 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Mercury Treaty Puts Spotlight On Japan's Minamata Chemical Disaster

Visitors viewing photographs of deceased Minamata disease victims displayed at the Minamata Tokyo Exhibition in 1996 (Timothy S. George)

Representatives from 140 countries gather in Minamata, Japan, this week to sign a global agreement to reduce mercury in the environment.

This comes nearly 80 years after a chemical plant in Minamata began releasing methyl mercury into the ocean.

The resulting mercury poisoning affected some 60,000 people and was officially recognized as Minamata disease in 1956.

The chemical poisoning is described as one of the world’s worse environmental disasters.

Read more
The Salt
3:13 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Fish For Dinner? Here Are A Few Tips For Sea Life Lovers

A fishmonger tosses a just-purchased fresh salmon to a colleague behind the counter at the Pike Place Fish Market in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:00 pm

If sustainability is a top priority when you're shopping at the fish counter, wild-caught seafood can be fraught with ethical complications.

One major reason why: bycatch, or the untargeted marine life captured accidentally by fishermen and, often, discarded dead in heaps. It's one of the most problematic aspects of industrial fishing.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:08 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Activists Sue U.N. Over Cholera That Killed Thousands In Haiti

Haitians protest against United Nations peacekeepers in Port-au-Prince in 2010.
Hector Retamal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:32 am

Human rights activists are suing the United Nations on behalf of five Haitian families afflicted by cholera — a disease many believe U.N. peacekeeping troops brought to Haiti in the aftermath of the devastating 2010 earthquake there.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Obama Nominates Janet Yellen To Head Federal Reserve

President Obama claps during a press conference to nominate Janet Yellen to head the Federal Reserve in the State Dining Room at the White House on Wednesday.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:49 pm

Saying "American workers and families will have a champion in Janet Yellen," President Obama officially nominated her to chair the Federal Reserve, once Ben Bernanke completes his term in January.

Yellen "is the kind of person who makes everybody around her better," Obama said, adding that Yellen is "extremely well qualified" and "renowned for her good judgement."

Obama made the announcement at the White House on Wednesday, flanked by Yellen and outgoing Fed chief Ben Bernanke. If confirmed, Yellen will be the first woman to head the American central bank.

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:25 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

An Innovation For Pain Relief That's Worthy Of Some Buzz

Buzzy uses high-frequency vibration and a cold pack to make shots, well ... if not enjoyable, then at least bearable.
MMJ Labs

Read more
The Two-Way
1:51 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

'Hero' Passenger Lands Small Plane After Pilot Fell Ill

Cessna light aircraft are pictured beside the runway at Humberside airport in north-east England, on October 9, 2013. A passenger with no flying experience made an emergency landing at Humberside airport in a light aircraft after the pilot became ill.
Lindsey Parnaby AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 1:52 pm

It feels like this kind of thing happens in the movies all the time: A pilot falls ill and, then, it's up to a passenger to land the plane.

Last night in Britain's Humberside airport, this happened for real on a small aircraft carrying two friends. As The Independent tells the story, John Wildey — whom the paper calls a "hero passenger" — had to take control of a Cessna 172 after his friend and pilot got sick and became unresponsive.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
1:28 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

What Is Classical Music's Women Problem?

Australian conductor Simone Young, the outgoing artistic director of the Hamburg State Opera.
Klaus Lefebvre Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 9:36 am

Close your eyes, and you may think that this is 1913. In the past few days, the classical music community has been set aflame by recent comments from three prominent male conductors who are — steel yourself — actually saying that women are not capable of standing on the podium.

Read more
Live in Concert
12:57 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Pusha T, Live In Concert

Pusha T performs live at NPR Music's showcase at Le Poisson Rouge in New York City on Wednesday, Oct. 16.
Loren Wohl for NPR

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 4:29 pm

Pusha T's set was the culmination of a gradual separation from his brother, No Malice, with whom he performed as Clipse until three years ago. The Virginia native made his name as a writer of sharply observed scenes of the drug trade and a connoisseur of unsettling, emotionally raw production.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Yuppie Condos Destroying Chinatowns?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Economy
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Janet Yellen's Resume Makes Us All Feel Like 'Slackers'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes, we will talk about people and their attachment to the land in two very different places in the United States, and how that attachment to the land may be threatened.

Read more
Politics
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Govt. Shutdown 'Wake-Up Call' To Native Americans

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. The partial government shutdown is now into its ninth day. There's no sign of a breakthrough anytime soon. So we are going to look at a number of ways the country is being affected. Later in the program, we'll speak with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax about how this stalemate is playing out with our trading partners overseas.

Read more
Can I Just Tell You?
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Service Members Keep Promises, Even If Congress Doesn't

Pfc. Norman McQueen, U.S. Army Air Corps
photo courtesy Michel Martin

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 2:07 pm

So finally today, you might have noticed I've been out of the office a bit lately. I'm taking that trip a lot of us have, or will be taking: having to get more involved in caring for an elderly parent. And because I've been on that road, I have found myself going through old drawers and boxes in a way I had no reason or right to do before now.

Read more
Television
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

'Raising McCain': Not Your Mother's Talk Show

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 2:30 pm

Read more
U.S.
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Property Taxes May Cause Slaves' Descendants To Lose Homes

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now to a different story about the changing face of another historic community. Sapelo Island, just off the coast of Georgia, is home to one of the few remaining Gullah Geechee enclaves. These tight knit communities in the nation's South-East trace their roots back to slavery times and share a distinct culture and dialect. But now that's being threatened by a changing economy.

Read more
It's All Politics
12:48 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

President Obama's 'It's Good To Be The King' Moment

President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner sit together at a Capitol event in February dedicating a statue of civil rights icon Rosa Parks.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 6:05 pm

It is good to be the king.

That old adage holds, even though nowadays we call our chief executive "Mr. President."

After another long day of showdown over the shutdown, President Obama was able to dominate the headlines, break the tension and change the atmosphere in Washington. He could demonstrate everything that is different about being in the White House — as opposed to that other House where Speaker John Boehner lives.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Shinseki: Shutdown Means Veterans Will Not Get Benefits

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki testifies on Capitol Hill in April.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 1:40 pm

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki warned lawmakers on Wednesday that the partial government shutdown means that about 3.8 million veterans will not receive disability compensation next month.

Shinseki, in testimony before the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs, said pensions to more than half a million vets or surviving spouses will also be derailed if the stalemate over a temporary spending measure drags on into late October.

The Associated Press reports:

Read more

Pages