Nation/World

Mythconception

Nov 12, 2015

Don't be a lemming and run off the side of a cliff! In this game we dissect common misconceptions and myths.

Heard in Peter Sarsgaard: A Day In The Life

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Edit, Please

Nov 12, 2015

The Benevolent Female Spouse? Edit, please! How about, The Good Wife? Contestants guess the simpler, actual TV show titles based on an over-written, way too literal version.

Heard in Peter Sarsgaard: A Day In The Life

Meet the Expert is Ask Me Another's new segment! Executive producer of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, Amy Kule, joins us onstage to lead a game based on this iconic holiday event. Did you know Snoopy is about to make his 39th parade appearance?

Heard in Peter Sarsgaard: A Day In The Life

Take a look at this photo. It's a handsome group portrait of, according to the Library of Congress, President Abraham Lincoln, flanked by Adm. David G. Farragut and Gens. William T. Sherman, George Henry Thomas, George Gordon Meade, Ulysses S. Grant, Joseph Hooker, Philip Henry Sheridan and Winfield Scott Hancock. The men look healthy, distinguished, prosperous.

There are a couple of hitches, however.

This summer, football players at Northwestern University came very close to successfully forming a union — not to demand that they be paid, but to demand better scholarships and safety protocols. Had their bid succeeded, it might have changed college athletics — and, indeed, higher education — in some fundamental ways.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

Just days after the University of Missouri's chancellor and the system president resigned under pressure from students, another college leader is facing a crucial moment.

Almost 8 percent of Americans 12 and older dealt with depression at some point between 2009 and 2012. With that many of us feeling blue, wouldn't it be nice if we could simply hop on the computer in our pajamas, without any of the stigma of asking for help, and find real relief?

Online programs to fight depression are already commercially available, and while they sound efficient and cost-saving, a study out of the U.K. reports that they're not effective, primarily because depressed patients aren't likely to engage with them or stick with them.

A Rambling Love Letter To The Silver Screen In 'How To Watch'

Nov 12, 2015

Between exhibits at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens, there's an interactive behind-the-scenes playground. You can record Marilyn Monroe's lines in the ADR booth; you can plug goofy sound effects into Jurassic Park. Sure, some of it's just to amuse kids (make the raptors meow!), but if you have an interest in the backstage how and why, it's good to see how a new soundtrack changes the gallery scene in Vertigo.

Brian Burton has good taste. As Danger Mouse, he's won five Grammy Awards and worked with everyone from the Black Keys to Gorillaz to Adele. Now the musician, songwriter and producer is adding another impressive project to his resume: his own record label.

Rolls-Royce Recalls 1 Car Over Airbag Issue

Nov 12, 2015
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Kurdish forces in Iraq have begun an offensive to try to take back the town of Sinjar from the Islamic State.

NPR's Alison Meuse reports that the 7,000 or so Kurdish fighters are expecting the town to be heavily mined. She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"A commander from the peshmerga forces of northern Iraq says his men have already taken a key highway that connects the Iraqi city of Mosul to ISIS's Syrian stronghold of Raqqa, and that they are moving slowly into the town of Sinjar.

'Hotels Of North America' Gets 4 Stars

Nov 12, 2015

Rick Moody wrote one of my favorite short stories of all time, a novella called "The Albertine Notes." He wrote one of the most affecting books of my young adulthood, The Ice Storm — and to a white-bread suburban kid who idolized the guts of Hubert Selby Jr., William Burroughs' crooked middle finger to all literary convention and the beautiful ugliness of Charles Bukowski's Skid Row vision, reading The Ice Storm was like swallowing a hand grenade.

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1990s revivalism may be entering its dwarf-star phase without ever having shed proper light on itself. Last week, the 22-year-old rapper Vince Staples argued that for his generation, hip-hop's official Golden Age matters less than the viral onset of 21st-century stars like Soulja Boy.

A controversial political action committee aligned with Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser is being shut down amid concerns that it was feeding a pay-to-play political culture in the nation's capital.

FreshPAC's treasurer, Ben Soto, said in an email that the group had become "too much of a distraction for the mayor."

Founded by supporters of the Democratic mayor, the group took advantage of a little-known campaign-finance law that allows PACs to raise unrestricted donations in nonelection years.

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Something encouraging happened yesterday in China's sputtering economy. It was Singles Day, and Alibaba, the e-commerce giant, generated more than $14 billion in online sales.

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Stan Lee is a legend. Along with artists Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, Lee helped populate the Marvel Comics universe with heroes like the Fantastic Four, the Incredible Hulk and Iron Man.

Their most famous creation — Lee calls him "Spidey" — is everywhere in this office, as a painting, a life-size doll, and even a pinball machine. "Nobody plays pinballs anymore," Lee tells NPR's Renee Montagne. "And it's really a good thing, because it doesn't work anymore."

At 7:30 a.m. Monday through Friday, you'll find Mark Gaither standing on Gough Street in southeast Baltimore. He's outside Wolfe Street Academy, the neighborhood elementary school where he's the principal.

Gaither has a huge umbrella in case it rains, and thick gloves for when it snows. He's here each morning to greet students and families as they come to school — which should make for at least 225 "good mornings."

Note: NPR's audio for First Listens comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

Note: NPR's audio for First Listens comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.


You either get The Grateful Dead or you don't, to the point where it's virtually impossible to explain. So why bother?

Note: NPR's audio for First Listens comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

The Food and Drug Administration is seeking your input to answer a question: How should the agency define "natural" on food labels?

Disagreement over what "all natural" or "100 percent natural" means has spawned dozens of lawsuits. Consumers have challenged the naturalness of all kinds of food products.

For instance, can a product that contains high fructose corn syrup be labeled as natural? What about products that contain genetically modified ingredients?

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Tim Wolfe is not the first college administrator to come under fire for responding poorly to campus racism. And Wolfe, until this week the head of the University of Missouri System, isn't likely to be the last.

College presidents who have themselves been in crisis have learned there's a right way — and a wrong way — to respond.

A street drug made of various chemicals sprayed on tea leaves, grass clippings and other plant material continues to send thousands of people suffering from psychotic episodes and seizures to emergency rooms around the country.

In 2015, calls to poison control regarding the drug already have almost doubled, compared to last year's total, and health professionals and lawmakers are struggling to keep up with the problem.

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