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All Tech Considered
4:21 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Facebook Takes On Cyberbullies As More Teens Leave Site

On Wednesday, Facebook released a digital resource center to expand its efforts against online harassment.
Facebook

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:18 pm

Facebook has rolled out a tool to address online harassment that some digital safety advocates are calling a beneficial, but belated, first step.

The social networking site with 1.2 billion users worldwide released a "bullying prevention hub" this week. It's essentially an online resource center with suggestions for teens, parents and educators on how to address bullying — both online and off — and take action on Facebook.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

The End Of The World, As She Knows It

Daisy (Saoirse Ronan) is just a typical teen struggling with boys, family and growing up — and also what might be the apocalypse.
Nicola Dove Magnolia Pictures

Because it serves up Armageddon with a side order of teen romance, How I Live Now is not always credible. But as a portrait of a surly 16-year-old whose internal crisis is overtaken by an external one, the movie is persuasive.

For that, credit goes partly to director Kevin Macdonald, but mostly to his star, Saoirse Ronan. Playing a neurotic urbanite who learns to survive in a war-ravaged landscape, the actress is, appropriately enough, a force of nature.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

One Big Lie, And All Of Lance Armstrong's Others

Alex Gibney's documentary started as a flattering profile of competitive cyclist Lance Armstrong, but all that changed after Armstrong admitted to years of doping — and lying to everyone about it.
Frank Marshall Sony Pictures Classics

"I didn't live a lot of lies. But I did live one big one. It's different, I guess. Maybe not."

So said disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong to filmmaker Alex Gibney early this year, just hours after he confessed to Oprah that he'd doped during his seven wins of the Tour de France.

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Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Turns Out One Does Simply Walk Into More 'Thor'

Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and his hammer are back for a supernatural sequel, battling the forces of evil again — this time without his fellow Avengers.
Jay Maidment Marvel

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:22 pm

Audiences for Thor: The Dark World may initially be confused as to whether they accidentally wandered into a preview screening of the next installment in the Hobbit series.

The opening prologue — a solemn Anthony Hopkins narrates an epic tale of ancient wars between the forces of good and a race of evil elves — feels like pure Tolkien, and with good reason: the Norse mythologies that inspired the Lord of the Rings author also informed Marvel Comics' Stan Lee and Larry Lieber as they went about developing their godlike superhero.

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It's All Politics
3:51 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

All In The Family: Jimmy Carter's Grandson Runs For Governor

Former President Jimmy Carter and his grandson, Georgia state Sen. Jason Carter, watch a baseball game between the Atlanta Braves and Philadelphia Phillies in Atlanta on Aug. 14.
John Bazemore AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:29 pm

Jimmy Carter's grandson is running for Carter's old job — governor of Georgia.

Democratic state Sen. Jason Carter formally announced Thursday he will challenge Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, joining a long list of relatives of famous politicians on ballots in 2014.

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Photography
3:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Photographer Editta Sherman, 'Duchess Of Carnegie Hall,' Dies At 101

Sherman poses for a photo in New York in July 2012.
Verena Dobnik AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 7:16 pm

For six decades, in her light-filled studio on top of New York's Carnegie Hall, portrait photographer Editta Sherman photographed celebrities from Leonard Bernstein to Yul Brynner to Joe DiMaggio. She was a legend — and she'd tell you that herself. Sherman died Friday at 101.

A note on her website reads: "Editta Sherman's vibrant sparkling life faded from this earth on November 1st, All Saints Day. She is at peace now and she is clothed in her ballerina dress with her diamond shoes dancing her way home to our hearts."

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Book Reviews
3:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Biography Of Director Bob Fosse Razzles, Dazzles And Delights

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

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Around the Nation
3:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Here, Drink A Nice Glass Of Sparkling Clear Wastewater

One man's sewage is another man's drinking water. As wastewater comes through this pipe, straw-like filters get rid of any contaminants wider than a human hair. That's just one step of the purification process.
Amy Standen KQED

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

In California's Silicon Valley, there will soon be a new source of water for residents. That may not sound like big news, but the source of this water – while certainly high-tech — is raising some eyebrows.

With freshwater becoming more scarce in many parts of the country, the public may have to overcome its aversion to water recycling.

Ah, The Stench Of Drinking Water

If text could transmit odor, you'd know where this water is coming from.

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The Two-Way
3:05 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Stanford Professor Who Sounded Alert On Multitasking Has Died

The question of how humans process the flood of electronic media was a central part of the work of Stanford University sociology professor Clifford Nass, who died recently. Citing multiple studies, Nass said people often overestimate their ability to multitask.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

Clifford Nass, the Stanford University sociologist who helped pioneer studies that undermined ideas about multitasking, has died at age 55. The man who dedicated his career to thinking about how humans live in a digital age died after taking part in a hike near Lake Tahoe Saturday.

At Stanford, Nass was "a larger than life character," his colleague professor Byron Reeves tells NPR's All Things Considered. Reeves says Nass "was just incredibly enthusiastic about his work, about students."

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The Salt
2:53 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

FDA Moves To Phase Out Remaining Trans Fats In Food Supply

Crisco was the original product made with partially hydrogenated soybean oil, which contains trans fats. Today, Crisco has only small amounts of the fats.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

If the Food and Drug Administration has its way, an era of food technology will soon end. The agency announced Thursday it is aiming to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products.

Margaret Hamburg, the FDA commissioner, said at a press conference that her agency has come to the preliminary conclusion that the oils "are not generally recognized as safe for use in food."

If the agency makes this decision final, it will mean a complete ban on this ingredient.

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Author Interviews
2:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Roy Choi's Tacos Channel LA And The Immigrant Experience

Chef Roy Choi was named Food and Wine Magazine's Best New Chef in 2010.
Bobby Fisher Courtesy of Harper Collins

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:24 pm

Roy Choi is a chef who's celebrated for food that isn't fancy. He's one of the founders of the food truck movement, where instead of hot dogs or ice cream, more unusual, gourmet dishes are prepared and sold. His Kogi trucks specialize in tacos filled with Korean barbecue.

Choi was born in South Korea in 1970 and moved to Los Angeles with his parents at the age of 2. His parents owned a Korean restaurant near Anaheim for a few years when he was a child. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that his mother had some serious cooking talent.

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Book Reviews
2:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

'Self-Help Messiah' Dale Carnegie Gets A Second Life In Print

Courtesy of Other Press

"Make the other person feel important." "Let the other fellow feel that the idea is his." "Make people like you." Those are some of the peppy commands that have sent generations of Americans out into the world, determined to win friends and influence people — oh, and make big bucks.

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It's All Politics
2:42 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Why Chris Christie's Popularity May Tear His Party Apart

Gov. Chris Christie visits with students at Jose Marti Freshman Academy in Union City, N.J., on Wednesday.
Rich Schultz AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:11 pm

Chris Christie has become a national phenomenon.

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NPR Story
2:42 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

'Here & Now' Interview Inspires Song Of The Year

Paul Monti is pictured in May 2011 with his son Jared's truck. Jared Monti was killed while serving in Afghanistan in 2006.(Anna Miller/Here & Now)

At the Country Music Association Awards last night, “I Drive Your Truck” won Song of the Year.

The song tells the story of a Massachusetts father whose son was killed in Afghanistan. The father drives his son’s Dodge Ram to honor his memory.

Paul Monti talked about his son Jared’s truck with Here & Now’s Alex Ashlock in May 2011. A songwriter in Nashville heard that interview and co-wrote the song, which was recorded by Lee Brice.

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NPR Story
2:42 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Murder Of Teen Sheds Light On World Of Street Youth

22-year-old “James” from Tillamook, Oregon shows off his graffiti art in an Olympia alleyway. (Austin Jenkins/Northwest News Network)

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 2:38 pm

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NPR Story
2:42 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

US Economic Growth Accelerates In Q3

Things are looking up in the U.S. economy — at least for the third quarter of this year.

The gross domestic product (GDP) — the measure of goods and services — rose at a 2.8 percent annual rate, much stronger than expected.

Economists expected third-quarter growth to be around a 2 percent annual rate, according to a Dow Jones survey.

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Shots - Health News
2:34 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Surgeons Discover Quirky Knee Ligament All Over Again

An anatomical drawing shows the ligaments on the outside surface of the knee. The anterolateral ligament connects the thigh bone to the shinbone.
Courtesy of University Hospitals Leuven

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 2:12 pm

About 150 years ago, a prestigious surgeon in Paris found a new body part while dissecting cadavers. He described the structure as a pearly, "fibrous band" on the outside of the bones in the knee.

That sure sounds like a ligament. But nobody really gave it much thought. And poof! Over the next hundred years or so, the body part was pretty much forgotten.

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Classical Sessions
2:20 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Paul Lewis: Confronting Schubert's Nightmare

Pianist Paul Lewis is drawn to the late piano sonatas by Franz Schubert.
Josep Molina Harmonia Mundi

Pianist Paul Lewis came to Boston to make his recital debut on Jan. 12. The evening before, at this performance he gave at WGBH's Fraser Performance Studio, he told the audience he suddenly realized there was a certain magic in that date. It had been exactly 20 years earlier — Jan. 12, 1993 — when the great pianist Alfred Brendel came to London's Guildhall School of Music & Drama to do a master class. "I thought he'd tell me to do something else with my life," Lewis remembered with a laugh.

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Senate Approves Bill To Add Sexual Orientation To Work Protections

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:34 pm

The Senate has approved the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which gives workplace protections to workers and job applicants who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. The bill would apply to any private employer that has more than 15 employees; it includes an exemption for religious groups.

The measure adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the list of characteristics that cannot be discriminated against in the workplace passed by a vote of 64-32 — a slightly stronger showing than an earlier vote to move forward on the legislation, which passed 61-30.

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The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

'Coaches Know Everything,' Former Dolphins Player Says

Miami Dolphins offensive linemen Richie Incognito, left, and Jonathan Martin in July.
Lynne Sladky AP

Here are three new stories to read if you're following what happened between Miami Dolphins linemen Richie Incognito and Jonathan Martin — and the uproar because of allegations that Martin was bullied or that Incognito is being unfairly accused:

-- "Incognito and Martin: An Insider's Story"

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Parallels
1:40 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

New Pakistani Taliban Leader Blamed For Schoolgirl Shooting

Mullah Fazlullah was selected Thursday as head of the Pakistani Taliban. Nicknamed "Radio Mullah" for his fiery religious broadcasts, he's also blamed for the 2012 attack on Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai.
Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 3:17 pm

The new leader of the Pakistani Taliban, Mullah Fazlullah, is perhaps best known for being the man behind the shooting attack on Malala Yousafzai, the schoolgirl who courageously campaigned for girls' education.

Fazlullah, who was elected Thursday as head of the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan, rose to prominence in Pakistan's Swat Valley earlier through his fiery religious radio broadcasts, which earned him the nickname "Radio Mullah."

Attack On Malala

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

He's 'Extremely Inebriated' In New Video, Toronto Mayor Says

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford on Thursday.
Mark Blinch Reuters/Landov

Add "obviously, I was extremely, extremely inebriated" to this week's amazing quotes from Toronto Mayor Rob Ford.

The mayor, who on Tuesday admitted that "yes I have smoked crack cocaine ... probably in one of my drunken stupors" after reports about one video he appears in, issued his "extremely inebriated" mea culpa on Thursday in response to another.

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Code Switch
1:28 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Dolphins' Story Is About Race And Bullying, But Not The Way You Think

Jonathan Martin would have been the first fourth-generation African-American Harvard student ever, had he not opted to go to Stanford instead. Teammates and his high school coach said that other players had trouble relating to him because of his background.
Wilfredo Lee AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 3:02 pm

Over the last few days, the sports media has been transfixed by the story of Jonathan Martin and Richie Incognito, two burly offensive lineman who play for the Miami Dolphins. Martin, a 24-year-old, second-year pro, abruptly walked away from the team last week after an incident with Incognito, 30, his frequent tormentor and the offensive line's unofficial leader.

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Alt.Latino
1:11 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Mexican Princesses And The Musical Kingdom Of Tijuana

Ceci Bastida.
Courtesy of the artist

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
12:39 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Ray Anderson's 'Sweet Chicago Suite' On JazzSet

Ray Anderson (right) leads his scaled-down Pocket Brass Band at the 2013 Newport Jazz Festival.
Adam Kissick for NPR

This set takes us to the 2013 Newport Jazz Festival for trombonist Ray Anderson and his Pocket Brass Band as they perform Anderson's Sweet Chicago Suite. To open: a high-energy chorus of "76 Trombones" by Pocket Brass at the 1997 Iowa City Jazz Festival, as originally heard on our long-running, go-where-the-music-is series, JazzSet.

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The Two-Way
12:37 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

'Off The Charts' Super Typhoon Haiyan Hits Philippines

A still image from a NOAA satellite shows the progress of Super Typhoon Haiyan. The powerful storm, which had packed winds stronger than 200 mph while at sea, made landfall early Friday morning in the Philippines.
NOAA

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 9:52 pm

Classified as a super typhoon, the Pacific storm Haiyan has made landfall in the Philippines, bringing top sustained winds that were measured at more than 195 miles per hour before landfall. The measurement reflects the winds sustained by the storm for one minute; the storm was also producing gusts of 230 mph.

Updated at 10:40 p.m. ET: Storm Strength Could Be Historic

The strength of the massive super typhoon could be record-setting, weather experts were saying Thursday night.

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Parallels
12:30 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Who Owns The Archives Of A Vanishing Iraqi Jewish World?

This colorfully illustrated French and Hebrew Passover Haggadah was published in Vienna in 1930. Caption on the image: "Eating Matzah." This restored document is part of an exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., that opens Nov. 8.
National Archives

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 11:22 am

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World Cafe
12:13 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

White Denim On World Cafe

White Denim.
Mark Seliger Courtesy of the artist

The psychedelic Austin rock band White Denim recently released its fourth album, Corsicana Lemonade, which cuts back on the shifting time signatures and guitar virtuosity the group had so often employed in the past. While those elements remain, they're subtler in a way that better serves the overall sound.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Super Mario Cut Interest Rates Today And That's Huge News

Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank. Some say he's super.
Daniel Reinhardt DPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 12:04 pm

Twitter's IPO is Thursday's sexy business story.

But the really big business news is that "the European Central Bank startled investors Thursday with a surprise cut in its benchmark interest rate." As The Associated Press adds, "The bank lowered the benchmark refinancing rate to a record low 0.25 percent from 0.5 percent."

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Mountain Stage
11:42 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Drew Kennedy On Mountain Stage

Drew Kennedy performs live on Mountain Stage.
Josh Saul Mountain Stage

Drew Kennedy makes his first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the north shore of Lake Superior in Grand Marais, Minn. A native of the Gettysburg area, Kennedy attended law school but was drawn to a life of music, which he's lived full-time since the mid-2000s. The singer-songwriter now makes his home in Texas, where his musicianship often draws comparison to Lone Star State heavyweights like Guy Clark.

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