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Sweetness And Light
2:02 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Root, Root, Root For The Home Team?

"In our world of global entertainment ... passports don't matter and ... taste trumps nationalism," says Frank Deford.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 8:01 am

Does a citizen of any country, not just the good ole U.S. of A., have an obligation to support its national teams? For goodness sake, it's just a game, not Horatius at the Bridge standing between us and national defeat.

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Law
2:01 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Supreme Court Case Puts Public Prayer Back In The Spotlight

The Supreme Court invokes "God" before every public session. Now the justices will weigh whether it is different, as a legal matter, for government meetings to include more explicitly sectarian prayers.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 9:00 am

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a case questioning the use of prayer at government meetings. But first, the marshal will ask "God" to "save the United States and this honorable court."

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Music
1:03 am
Wed November 6, 2013

No Instruments? For Pentatonix, It's No Problem

Pentatonix's album, PTX Vol. 2, is out now.
Brandon Lyon Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:40 pm

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Kitchen Window
11:03 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Yes, It's Worth It To Make Your Own Yogurt

Nicole Spiridakis for NPR

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 10:35 am

On the verge of a move to Casablanca, Morocco, for the next four years, I spent a month there this summer to dip my toes figuratively — and literally, into the Atlantic — into my new life. I became almost accustomed to the ongoing calls to prayer and cooked with gorgeous produce acquired from my neighborhood souk. I drank all sorts of delicious and cheap fresh-squeezed juices at the cafe up the street and watched cars and donkey-pulled carts pass by in equal measure. I ate too many French-inspired pastries, and I made my own yogurt.

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Around the Nation
5:14 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Silenced By Status, Farm Workers Face Rape, Sexual Abuse

Maricruz Ladino packs lettuce in a cooler in Salinas, Calif.
Grace Rubenstein Center for Investigative Reporting

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:36 pm

This is part one of a two-part report about sexual assault of agricultural workers in the U.S.

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Law
4:59 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Love Triangle Case Puts Chemical Weapons Treaty To The Test

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:43 pm

At the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, the subject for debate was the reach of the Constitution's treaty power. But the justices' questions covered subjects from sarin gas to Halloween trick-or-treating. And the facts of the case sounded more like a soap opera.

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Code Switch
4:42 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Fla. School District Trying To Curb School-To-Prison Pipeline

In 2010 and 2011, there were more than 1,000 school-related arrests in Broward County. Nearly three-quarters of them were for non-violent misdemeanors.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 7:57 pm

In Florida, one of the nation's largest school districts has overhauled its discipline policies with a single purpose in mind — to reduce the number of children going into the juvenile justice system.

It's a move away from so-called "zero tolerance" policies that require schools to refer even minor misdemeanors to the police. Critics call it a "school to prison pipeline."

Civil rights and education activists say the policy can be a model for the nation.

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The Two-Way
4:36 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Illinois House Approves Bill Paving Way For Gay Marriage

Jerry Bowman (left) and David Strzepek demonstrate at a marriage-equality rally in Springfield, Ill., on Monday.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 6:02 pm

With the approval of the Statehouse, same-sex marriages are one step away from being legal in Illinois.

The Chicago Tribune reports the bill received 61 votes, just one more than necessary to send the bill to the Senate, which is expected to pass it.

The House was the bill's biggest hurdle because Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn has said he would sign the bill into law.

The Tribune adds:

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The Two-Way
4:26 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Developing Super-Typhoon Aims For The Philippines

A graphic from the U.S. Naval Observatory showing the expected track of Typhoon Haiyan.
U.S. Naval Observatory

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:55 pm

Another super-typhoon is brewing in the western Pacific, and forecasters are saying it will likely slam into the Philippines on Friday, packing winds of 155mph.

Weather Underground meteorologist Jeff Masters says Typhoon Haiyan "will likely be the most dangerous tropical cyclone to affect the Philippines this year."

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Technology
4:16 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

The Most Secure Password In The World Might Be You

The iPhone 5s includes a fingerprint scanner that can be used in lieu of a PIN or password. Some tech giants say finger or voice recognition is the wave of the future.
Graham Melling iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 8:22 pm

You're probably well-acquainted with one of life's little annoyances: the password.

Your voicemail. Your email. Your smartphone. Maybe you've got a different one for each — which means you're bound to slip up.

Or maybe you use the same one for everything — a security no-no. The number of sites and services that demand a password or PIN seems to have grown exponentially. And keeping track of the ones you've got? Forget about it.

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The Two-Way
4:14 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Apple's Decision To Make Glass In Arizona Will Create Hundreds Of Jobs

Apple has bought a factory in Arizona that will be re-purposed to make sapphire glass. The material is used in the iPhone 5s, seen here, as well as in the wristwatch industry.
Andy Wong AP

Technology giant Apple is buying a large manufacturing space in Arizona, where high-tech glass for its devices will be produced. The move is being hailed in Arizona, where the economy remains slowed by the U.S. housing market crisis.

From Phoenix, Mark Moran of member station KJZZ reports for our Newscast unit:

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Environment
3:56 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Thanks To Parasites, Moose Are Looking More Like Ghosts

A large bull moose is inspected by a hunter at a weigh station in Maine.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:48 pm

The news for moose is not good across the country's northern tier and in some parts of Canada. A recent and rapid decline of moose populations in many states may be linked to climate change, and to the parasites that benefit from it.

In Minnesota, moose populations have dropped from a high of more than 12,000 two decades ago to fewer than 3,000 now. Moose in some parts of Manitoba have declined by 50 percent and more.

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NPR Story
3:56 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Study Says 40 Billion Planets In Our Galaxy Could Support Life

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

As China and India race to Mars, we'll venture outside our solar system and consider this mind-expanding possibility: There could be 40 billion planets in our Milky Way galaxy that are orbiting stars in a habitable zone that could support life - 40 billion. Makes you kind of puny, doesn't it?

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NPR Story
3:56 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Beleaguered Florida Citrus Industry Hits New Snags

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Florida's citrus industry has a new problem. It's long wrestled with crop diseases like canker and greening. But the effort to halt greening has killed millions of bees, as growers have increased their use of pesticides.

And that, in turn, is straining relationships between citrus farmers and their longtime partners, beekeepers. Here's Ashley Lopez of member station WGCU.

ASHLEY LOPEZ, BYLINE: Harold Curtis runs an 1,100-acre grove in southwest Florida. He walks through the rows of trees, packed full of plump, juicy oranges.

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NPR Story
3:56 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Toronto Mayor Says He Doesn't Smoke Crack, But Admits He Has

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:19 pm

At a news conference Tuesday, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford admitted he has smoked crack cocaine. Melissa Block talks to Jamie Strashin of the CBC for the latest.

Code Switch
3:37 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

As City Grapples With Murder Rate, Police Chief Reaches Out

Just months after Wade Ingram became police chief in Gary, Ind., in January 2012, he began an unusual initiative: visiting the family of each of the city's homicide victims.

That's meant many visits for Ingram.

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NPR Story
3:12 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

DJ Sessions: Afrobeat After Fela Kuti

Members of the Afrobeat band, Soul Jazz Orchestra. (Soul Jazz Orchestra)

The genre of Afrobeat was started by Fela Kuti, the legendary Nigerian singer and political activist who died of AIDS in 1997.

There’s been a push to teach people more about him, with museum exhibits, books and the critically acclaimed Broadway musical, “Fela!”

But how has Afrobeat developed since Fela Kuti, and what does it sound like today?

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NPR Story
3:12 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Tensions Continue To Rise Between US And Pakistan

Pakistan’s parliament will discuss the country’s ties to the U.S., after an American drone strike killed Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud last week.

Pakistanis reacted angrily, saying the strike violated its sovereignty.

“The two sides will continue to need each other and to continue to distrust each other,” Owen Bennett Jones, a BBC contributor based in Pakistan, told Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
3:12 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Twitter Looks To Its News Role In Upcoming IPO

Screenshot of Twitter feed.

Expectations are high this week as Twitter gets ready to go public.

The company raised its initial public offering price yesterday to $25 a share, up from $23. That would put the company’s value at around$13.6 billion — almost 12 times the value of its projected 2014 sales.

Twitter has 230 million users and not all of them are following Lady Gaga or Justin Bieber. A new Pew study shows 8 percent of Americans use Twitter to get news.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Saudi Authorities Round Up Thousands Of Illegal Immigrants

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:57 pm

After a seven-month grace period expired on Monday, Saudi authorities began rounding up thousands of illegal immigrants in cities across the kingdom.

Reuters reports the government hopes that deporting the immigrants will open up jobs for citizens of Saudi Arabia. The wire service reports:

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Shots - Health News
2:51 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

In Colorado, A Couple Finds Relief In Obamacare

Lela Petersen, owner of the Anything And Everything store in Flagler, Colo., expects the cost of health insurance for her and her husband to drop by my more than half next year.
Jeff Brady

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 3:07 pm

There's plenty of criticism of the Affordable Care Act and how it's being implemented.

But let's introduce you to someone who is quite pleased with her Obamacare experience: Lela Petersen of Flagler, Colo. She's a small business owner with a very big health insurance bill.

But thanks to the health law, she expects that bill will be cut by more than half in January.

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The Salt
2:49 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Make Room For Mushrooms: Fungi Compete With Meat In Burgers

Richard Blais' Earth & Turf Burger, served at the Flip Burger Boutique in Atlanta, is 50 percent beef, 50 percent mushroom.
Courtesy of Flip Burger Boutique

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:00 pm

With so many people reconsidering their meat consumption, the mushroom industry is hoping their product can become the next "other" white meat.

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World Cafe
2:46 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Willy Mason On World Cafe

Willy Mason.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally from Martha's Vineyard, New England singer-songwriter Willy Mason has enjoyed much of his success in Europe, where albums such as 2004's Where the Humans Eat and 2007's If the Ocean Gets Rough were met with wide acclaim.

After a six-year hiatus, Mason put out his third album, Carry On, in the U.K. last year; a U.S. release recently followed. This session marks the first time he's performed with a band at the WXPN studio.

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Author Interviews
2:10 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Sales Take Center Stage: To Boost Morale, Companies Burst Into Song

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Steve Young learned about industrial musicals when he started coming across compilations, like this one, in used record stores. (You definitely want to click to enlarge this.)
Courtesy of Blast Books

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:47 am

Why would someone write a sentimental ballad about a bathroom? For the same reason someone would write a rousing song about tractors: So the song could be used in what's called an industrial musical.

These musicals were like Broadway shows, but they were written and performed for corporate sales meetings and conventions from the 1950s to the 1980s. The lyrics were all about the products being sold and how to sell them. Some of them were lavish and costly, even though they'd be performed only once.

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All Songs Considered
2:00 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

New Mix: The Beatles, James Blake, Colin Meloy, More

Clockwise from top: The Beatles, James Blake, Colin Meloy, Marisa Anderson
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 9:53 am

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The Two-Way
1:56 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Virtual 'Sweetie' Uncovered 1,000 Sexual Predators, Group Says

"Sweetie," the little virtual girl created by a Dutch charity to expose the problem of webcam child sex tourism.
Terre des Hommes

A Dutch charity that aims to expose and end "webcam child sex tourism" says it lured tens of thousands of men from around the world to a website where they asked a lifelike, computer-generated 10-year-old Filipino girl named Sweetie to perform sex acts for money.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Charlie Trotter, Famous Chicago Chef, Has Died At 54

Chef Charlie Trotter, who helped revitalize Chicago's culinary reputation, has died at age 54. He's seen here at the 2006 International Gastronomy Summit in Madrid.
Pierre-Philippe Marcou AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 4:04 pm

Charlie Trotter, whose eponymous Chicago restaurant became an institution and helped pave the way for innovative small dishes that featured fresh and unique food, has died at age 54.

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Shots - Health News
1:05 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Wondering If You Need A Strep Test? Crowdsourcing Might Help

Wouldn't it be nice to be able to skip the strep test sometimes?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 1:35 pm

Most sore throats aren't strep. But because strep bacteria can in rare cases cause rheumatic fever, people often feel like they should get tested for possible strep infection.

It might be possible to skip that step someday by checking whether your neighbors have been getting strep throat, researchers say. Aside from reducing the cost and inconvenience of needless clinic visits, the neighborhood strep check could reduce the risk of being needlessly treated with antibiotics.

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Mountain Stage
12:55 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Matraca Berg On Mountain Stage

Matraca Berg performs live on Mountain Stage with her husband, Jeff Hanna of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.
Josh Saul Mountain Stage

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 2:21 pm

Singer-songwriter Matraca Berg appears on this episode of Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of the North House Folk School in Grand Marais, Minn. As one of Nashville's most respected and sought-after songwriters, Berg has seen her songs recorded by the likes of Linda Ronstadt, Reba McEntire, Emmylou Harris and Martina McBride.

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The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Nazi Art Trove Includes Previously Unknown Matisse, Chagall Works

A painting by German artist Franz Marc titled Horses in Landscape is projected on a wall during a press conference on the spectacular art find of nearly 1,500 works in Munich, Germany. Officials say they face a long investigation into the hoarded art.
Marc Mueller EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 3:06 pm

The revelation Monday that more than 1,000 paintings and prints seized by the Nazis during World War II were found in a Munich apartment has set off excitement in the art world and spurred anger among Jewish groups that German officials didn't publicize the discovery when it was first made.

With a potential value of $1.35 billion, the trove of art contains previously unknown works by Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall; other artists represented include Pablo Picasso, Auguste Renoir and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

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