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All Tech Considered
4:29 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

What Today's Online Sharing Companies Can Learn From Napster

Napster founder Shawn Fanning in February 2001, after a ruling that the free Internet-based service must stop allowing copyrighted material to be shared.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 8:02 pm

This week on-air and online, the tech team is exploring the sharing economy. You'll find the stories on this blog and aggregated at this link, and we would love to hear your questions about the topic. Just email, leave a comment or tweet.

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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Atlanta Braves Shock Fans With Plan To Move To Suburbs

Undeveloped land stands in the area where a new stadium will be built for the Atlanta Braves. Monday, the team announced that it will leave Turner Field and move into a new stadium outside the city.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:21 pm

In a move that took many fans by surprise, the Atlanta Braves announced Monday that the team will move to the city's suburbs, where it will build a new stadium. The team's lease on Turner Field, the Braves' home since 1997, will expire in 2016.

The new stadium will be located "just outside Atlanta's city limits," reports Atlanta Daily World.

Georgia Public Broadcasting's Jane Hammond reports:

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Code Switch
4:22 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

In California, A High School That Cheers A-R-A-B-S

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The Coachella Valley High School mascot gives the thumbs up at a 2010 football game. Image courtesy of MyDesert.com.
Jay Calderon Courtesy of The Desert Sun

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:52 pm

Last week, Coachella Valley High School came under fire for the name of its mascot — the Arab. The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee sent a letter to the school, complaining about the way the mascot depicts people of Arab descent. The complaint made the school national news.

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Science
4:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

This map from the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image.
NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:13 pm

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It's All Politics
4:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Senate Votes To Send A Message Ahead Of Next Year's Election

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid speaks during a news conference as the Senate prepares to vote on a bill that would prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation on Thursday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:52 pm

Midterm elections are still a year off, but the scramble to gain a political edge at the polls is already well underway on Capitol Hill.

Bills are brought up and votes taken not so much in hopes they will prevail, but rather to send a political message. In the Senate, both parties are at it.

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Business
4:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

It's A New Orleans Mantra, But Using 'Who Dat' May Cost You

The phrase "Who Dat" is ubiquitous in New Orleans. A Texas-based company says it owns the rights to the phrase, and while homemade signs don't run afoul of its trademark, it says merchandise like T-shirts is another matter.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:46 pm

During pro football season, New Orleans becomes " 'Who Dat' Nation." Fans open New Orleans Saints games with the signature chant and use it to rattle the eardrums of opponents during play.

Since the Saints' Super Bowl win in 2010, the phrase has popped up everywhere, from T-shirts to business names. Even people who don't watch football call themselves "Who Dats." But a messy legal question keeps rearing its head here: Who owns "Who Dat"?

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Africa
4:21 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

DRC Rebels' Surrender Could Mark New Chapter In U.N. Peacekeeping

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:52 pm

There's been a rare bit of good news in Eastern Congo this month. One of the rebel groups that have terrorized civilians in the mineral rich part of the the Democratic Republic of Congo agreed to end its rebellion. There's still a lot of work to do to disarm the M23 and to keep other rebel movements in check. But this small victory is a boost for U.N. peacekeepers, who are under a new, tougher mandate to protect civilians in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Some experts wonder if this could be a new model for peacekeeping.

The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Storm Surge And Low-Lying Philippines Made A Deadly Combination

Residents wade through flood waters on Sunday in Tacloban City, Leyte, Philippines, in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.
Jeoffrey Maitem Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:03 pm

The worst part of Typhoon Haiyan, which is thought to have killed as many as 10,000 people in the Philippines, was storm surge, NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on All Things Considered.

Joyce spoke with storm surge expert Carl Drews, of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado. Dawes says the surge was greatest at Tacloban City, where the Leyte Gulf narrows into the San Pedro and San Pablo Bay.

"That is about the worst path and the worst place for surge," Drews says.

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Shots - Health News
3:57 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

$4.2 Billion Deal Highlights Drug Profits From Rare Diseases

Flemming Ornskov, CEO of Shire, says the company's offer for ViroPharma is part of a broader push into orphan drugs.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:14 am

Two drugmakers you may have never heard of just agreed to a big deal.

Ireland's Shire says it's paying $4.2 billion for ViroPharma, which makes a drug to treat a rare condition called hereditary angioedema. People with the inherited condition are prone to swelling that can be life-threatening. About 1 in 50,000 people have the genetic mutation that causes the problem.

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Parallels
3:33 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Will The French Really Pay More for 'Made in France'?

French Minister for Industrial Renewal Arnaud Montebourg attends the Made in France fair in Paris on Saturday. According to a poll, more than 70 percent of the French say they would pay more for goods made at home.
Alain Jocard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:52 pm

The French economy suffers from many ailments: weak growth, high unemployment, poor competitiveness and a general sense of economic gloom. And every proposed government remedy seems to be met by protests from one corner or another.

Yet no one seems to be arguing with a little injection of economic patriotism.

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The Two-Way
3:28 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Thanking Veterans And Remembering Their Sacrifices

Members of the New York State National Guard march in the annual Veterans Day Parade on Fifth Avenue in New York Monday. The parade honored all veterans, with a special salute to women in uniform.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Americans are marking Veterans Day in a variety of ways Monday, from public ceremonies to proud notes on social media and quiet remembrances in homes and offices. Photos of husbands and grandfathers, mothers and sisters popped up on Facebook as a way to honor military veterans; on Twitter, the top four tags Monday afternoon revolved around veterans.

Here's a rundown of events and stories about those who served:

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NPR Story
3:22 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Remembering Vietnam Through Photographs

Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, South Vietnamese chief of the national police, fires his pistol into the head of suspected Viet Cong official Nguyen Van Lem on a Saigon street early in the Tet Offensive, February 1, 1968. Photographer Eddie Adams reported that after the shooting, Loan approached him and said, “They killed many of my people, and yours too,” then walked away. (Eddie Adams/AP) 1969 Pulitzer Prize winner for Spot News Photography
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NPR Story
3:22 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Journalist Depicts Battle In 24-Foot-Long Cartoon

Detail from Plate 5 of Joe Sacco's The Great War: July 1, 1916: The First Day of the Battle of the Somme. The basilica of the town of Albert, visible in the top right, is an important staging point behind the front. (Joe Sacco/W. W. Norton & Company)

Joe Sacco is best known as a journalist whose dispatches from places like the Middle East and Bosnia come in the form of cartoons.

In his latest book, “The Great War,” Sacco uses his drawings to depict the first day of one of the worst battles of  World War I: the Battle of the Somme.

Sacco recreates that day from its hopeful beginning to its brutal end in a book that is a 24-foot-long panorama.

NPR’s Lynn Neary reports.

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NPR Story
3:22 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Manufacturing Making A Comeback In The US

Airbus is one of a number of companies that has opened manufacuring facilities in the U.S. This image shows the initial manufacturing-related employess at the Airbus plant in Mobile, Alabama. (Airbus)

After decades of losing jobs and business to China, manufacturing is starting to look up again in the United States, according to the latest data.

The high cost of shipping, higher wages abroad and an abundance of domestic natural gas are all contributing to a manufacturing upswing in the U.S.

Companies like Dow Chemical, Shell Chevron, Exxon and Bayer are expanding current U.S. plants and building new ones.

Airbus will make planes in Alabama and Samsung is building a semiconductor plant in Texas.

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Microphone Check
2:39 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Eight Million Stories: Hip-Hop In 1993

Faith Newman, Ralph McDaniels and Prince Paul at the Ace Hotel Sept. 25.
Ebru Yildiz for NPR

All year Morning Edition and NPR Music have been running radio pieces about rap albums released 20 years ago, in 1993. For a special episode of Microphone Check we invited a group of people who were working in hip-hop back then to meet us at the Ace Hotel in New York City and tell stories about that productive and creative year. At the audio link you can hear an edited version of the evening.

Our guests were:

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World Cafe
2:23 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

World Cafe Next: Star Anna

Star Anna.
Courtesy of the artist
  • Hear Two Songs By Star Anna

This week's pick for World Cafe: Next is Seattle singer-songwriter Star Anna, an up-and-coming artist who's already attracted the attention of hometown musicians, including Pearl Jam's Mike McCready.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Police: Indie Musicians Killed By Former Bandmate In NYC

Police say three musicians, two from an Iranian-American indie rock group, were shot and killed early Monday and a fourth person was wounded in the East Williamsburg area of Brooklyn, New York. The alleged assailant, who took his own life, was also a musician, they said.

According to The Associated Press:

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Music Reviews
2:14 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Pop's Resident Provocateur Fizzles On 'ARTPOP'

Lady Gaga's new album, ARTPOP, is out now.
Inez and Vinoodh Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:54 pm

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The Salt
1:55 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Subway Sriracha Chicken Melt

A pre-fight screen in the new edition of Sandwich Kombat.
Subway

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 11:58 am

It's been a big couple of weeks for Sriracha hot sauce. First, a Los Angeles suburb sued a Sriracha factory for allegedly producing a spicy toxic cloud. And now, Subway has unveiled its Sriracha Chicken Melt, made with only the finest spicy toxic cloud.

Ian: I'm guessing it's spicy because the Subway sandwich artist started by telling me my Sandwich Safe Word.

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Music
1:23 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Remembering Cheb I Sabbah, DJ Who Built A New Musical World

Composer, musician and DJ Cheb I Sabbah, who died Thursday at age 66.
Shay Peretz Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 9:43 am

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Hundreds Attend Funeral Of WWII Veteran They Didn't Know

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A cross adorned with a poppy was among the ways Harold Percival was remembered Monday. Poppies have been a symbol of remembrance for veterans since the poem In Flanders Fields was written in 1915 by a Canadian military doctor.
Nigel Roddis Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:15 am

Whether you know it as Veterans Day here in the U.S. or as Remembrance Day in Commonwealth countries, we think you'll agree that something remarkable happened on this Nov. 11 in England.

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It's All Politics
1:03 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

When Lobbyists Literally Write The Bill

Lobbyists for Citigroup, one of the country's largest banks, offered lawmakers draft language for a bill that was obtained by New York Times and Mother Jones reporters. And 70 of the 85 lines in the final House bill reflected Citigroup's recommendations.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:52 pm

It's taken for granted that lobbyists influence legislation. But perhaps less obvious is that they often write the actual bills — even word for word.

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All Songs Considered
1:01 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Question Of The Week: Do You Collect Setlists?

A remarkably illustrated setlist for musician Dan Wilson.
Anonymous Reader

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 2:33 pm

Earlier this week we asked you to submit photos of the setlists you've collected over the years. We got a lot of amazing pics. Some, such as the Elliott Smith setlist from 1999, felt like rare treasures. We've added some of our favorites to the gallery below. Click the info icon or mouse over the images for captions and explanations for each one.

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All Tech Considered
12:57 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

A Few Places Where Government Tech Procurement Works

Kansas City is one of the cities making technology a bigger priority in its procurement processes.
Brent Flanders Flickr

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:52 pm

The botched start of HealthCare.gov is just the latest big federal tech system to fail at launch, but information technology research group Standish found that during the last decade, 94 percent of the large-scale federal IT projects have been similarly unsuccessful.

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The Impact of War
12:38 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

In 'Fire And Forget,' Vets Turned Writers Tell Their War Stories

U.S. Army soldiers begin their journey home from Iraq on July 13, 2010.
Maya Alleruzzo AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:43 pm

This Veterans Day, considers these lines from the preface to Fire And Forget, a collection of short stories by veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan:

On the one hand, we want to remind you ... of what happened ... and insist you recollect those men and women who fought, bled, and died in dangerous and far-away places. On the other hand, there's nothing most of us would rather do than leave these wars behind. No matter what we do next, the soft tension of the trigger pull is something we'll carry with us forever.

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NPR Story
12:38 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Families Seek Congressional Medal For All-Hispanic Unit

World War II veteran Luis Rodriguez, 91, is pictured with his daughters, Judy and Beth. (Lucy Nalpathanchil/WNPR)

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:44 am

The history of the U.S military includes contributions from segregated units. One unit many Americans know little about are the Borinqueneers. They were an all-Hispanic unit in the U.S Army that served in World Wars I and II. But it was the Korean War when the unit rose to prominence. As Lucy Nalpathanchil of WNPR reports, there’s a growing movement to honor these veterans with the Congressional Gold Medal.

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It's All Politics
12:34 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

A Week Later, Still Too Close To Call In Virginia

State Sen. Mark Obenshain speaks at the Virginia Republican convention in Richmond on May 18. He currently holds a 17-vote lead over Democratic state Sen. Mark Herring in the state's attorney general election.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:06 pm

There's still one election yet to be decided from last Tuesday: the Virginia attorney general's race.

The latest figures released Sunday night show it's about as close as it gets: Republican state Sen. Mark Obenshain leads Democratic state Sen. Mark Herring by just 17 votes out of more than 2.2 million cast.

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Shots - Health News
12:33 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Movies Rated PG-13 Feature The Most Gun Violence

Gun violence has become increasingly common in PG-13 movies like The Avengers, released in 2012.
Zade Rosenthal AP

Parents who rely on movie ratings to decide what their children can watch may think that PG-13 films have fewer villains flashing guns than R-rated movies.

But they're wrong.

The PG-13 movies actually show more gun violence, a study finds.

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World Cafe
12:27 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Broken Social Scene On World Cafe

Members of Broken Social Scene.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 1:18 pm

This segment, from March 2, 2006, is part of our Vintage Cafe series, in which we revisit some of our best studio performances.

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Mountain Stage
12:18 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Ani DiFranco On Mountain Stage

Ani DiFranco performing live on Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 12:19 pm

Ani DiFranco appears on this special 800th episode of Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences in Charleston, W.V. A fiercely independent singer-songwriter, activist and artist, DiFranco blazed her own path through the music world, implementing a fan-centered business model in the early '90s that all but predicted the future of the industry.

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