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3:04 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

A Country At A Crossroads, And Kiev Partly In Flames

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 7:02 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. We begin this hour with the crisis in Ukraine. In the capital, Kiev, anti-government protesters stormed the central post office one day after violent street battles with police left at least 25 people dead. Well tonight also brought hope for peace there. Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych met with opposition leaders, and they have agreed for the moment to stop the fighting.

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The Two-Way
3:04 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

If Yellowstone Could Talk, It Might Squeak. Blame The Helium

Sunset on the Firehole River, Yellowstone National Park.
Bill Young Flickr

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 7:02 pm

A huge amount of ancient helium is rising up from the rocks beneath Yellowstone National Park — about enough to fill up a Goodyear blimp every week.

The gas comes from a vast store of helium that's accumulated in the Earth's crust for hundreds of millions of years, scientists report in the journal Nature this week.

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Music
3:04 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Years After Tragedy, Norwegian Pop Star Returns To World Stage

Mo performs in 2011, the year he rose to prominence on Norway's version of The X Factor.
Ernst Vikne Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 10:36 am

Back in 2011, Mohamed Abdi Farah, who goes by the stage name Mo, seemed to be Norway's next rising pop star. Success on his country's version of The X Factor led to a record deal and the release of several singles, all before his 18th birthday. But then, Mo found himself in the middle of a national nightmare: a mass shooting on the Norwegian island of Utøya.

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Parallels
1:46 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Who's The Momma? Artist Gets Asians Young And Old To Swap Styles

This clothing swap seems perfectly natural to me.
via Qozop

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 4:07 pm

Ever wear your parents' or grandparents' old clothes or have them wear yours? A photographer asked individuals to swap garb with their relatives who are from a different generation.

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Metropolis
1:32 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Song Premiere: Jungle, 'Busy Earnin"

The sprawling London collective Jungle.
Oliver Hadlee Pearch Courtesy of the artist

The London electronic/funk/dance collective Jungle has popped up many times in our Metropolis mixes over the past six months. The group, led by the vaguely anonymous duo J and T, is releasing its debut album later this year, and is primed to catch on in America during stops in New York City and SXSW next month.

Metropolis host Jason Bentley premiered the record's first single, "Busy Earnin'," on KCRW in Santa Monica, Calif., on Wednesday morning. If you weren't listening, we've got you covered — you can stream the radio edit right here.

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

World's Largest Oyster Is Size Of A Man's Shoe

It's alive: At nearly 14 inches long, this oyster has been certified as the world's largest. It's also around the same size as a man's size 10-1/2 or 11 shoe here in the U.S.
Wadden Sea Centre

The world's largest oyster is nearly 14 inches long and resides in Denmark, according to the folks at Guinness World Records. And it's still alive and growing, according to Christine Ditlefsen, the biologist at the Wadden Sea Centre whose world record was recently certified.

The oyster was found in October in Wadden Sea National Park, a shallow area off of the North Sea on Denmark's southwestern coast. Its size and shape could be said to resemble a huge plaintain. But when they found it, the Wadden staff compared the oyster to a large and sturdy shoe.

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Movie Reviews
1:11 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

For A Rabbi Who Worked With The Nazis, Is Judgment 'Unjust'?

In 1975, Shoah director Claude Lanzmann (left) interviewed Benjmain Murmelstein, the last surviving Elder of the Jews of the Czech Theresienstadt ghetto, at his home in Rome. The resulting film is The Last of the Unjust.
Cohen Media Group

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 1:38 pm

When you're faced with something as heinous as the Holocaust, it's tempting to turn it into a simple morality play. This isn't to say one can't pass moral judgments — Hitler and his cohort were undeniably evil. But judging can become a form of lazy evasion, a way of closing the book on the tricky realities of failure, guilt and complicity.

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Author Interviews
1:11 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

One Man's Quest To Find The 'Sonic Wonders Of The World'

Why does thunder rumble? Acoustic professor Trevor Cox explains that it has to do with the way lightning is a jagged line. "Each little kink is actually generating the sound, and the reason thunder rumbles is because the sound takes different time to come from different kinks because they're all slightly different distances from you," he says.
Mariana Suarez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 1:38 pm

Ever wonder why your voice sounds so much better when you sing in the shower? It has to do with an acoustic "blur" called reverberation. From classical to pop music, reverberation "makes music sound nicer," acoustic engineer Trevor Cox tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. It helps blend the sound, "but you don't want too much," he warns.

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Parallels
12:58 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

4 Things To Know About What's Happening In Ukraine

Anti-government protesters throw stones during clashes with riot police in Kiev's Independence Square on Wednesday.
Efrem Lukatsky AP

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 3:08 pm

This post has been updated to reflect Friday's agreement reached between the government and the opposition.

Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych and leaders of the anti-government opposition reached an agreement on a deal to hold new elections, form a unity government and restore a constitution drafted in 2004. The deal could lead to an end to the violence that has killed more than 70 people since it erupted earlier this week.

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The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Jailed Protest Leader Urges Venezuelans To Keep Demonstrating

Venezuelan opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez (in white shirt) as he turned himself over to police on Tuesday in Caracas.
Cristian Hernandez Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 1:10 pm

In a video released Wednesday, imprisoned protest leader Leopoldo Lopez urges his supporters in Venezuela to continue pressing for the resignation of President Nicolas Maduro, Reuters reports from Caracas.

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Parallels
12:06 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Why Can't The Former Soviet Republics Figure Out Democracy?

Anti-government protesters clash with police on Independence Square in Ukraine's capital Kiev early Wednesday. The protests have been going on for three months, and Tuesday was the deadliest day yet, with at least 25 reported killed.
Sergei Supinsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 2:09 pm

The Soviet Union collapsed more than 20 years ago, yet genuine democracy is still a stranger in most of the 15 former republics. Ukraine, where at least 25 people were killed on Tuesday, is just the latest bloody example.

From President Vladimir Putin's hard-line rule in Russia to the 20-year reign of Alexander Lukashenko in Belarus to the assorted strongmen of Central Asia, many post-Soviet rulers consistently display a fondness for the old days, when opposition was something to be squashed, not tolerated.

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Code Switch
11:55 am
Wed February 19, 2014

After Tour, Medal For WWII Japanese-American Soldiers Returns Home

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team, shown here in a 1944 photo taken in France, returned home from World War II as one of the most decorated U.S. military units.
Courtesy of National Archives

More than 70 years ago Wednesday, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order that led to the internment of more than 110,000 Japanese-Americans during World War II.

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Shots - Health News
11:48 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Sit More, And You're More Likely To Be Disabled After Age 60

Sure, it's relaxing. But all those hours on the sofa may make it hard to actually stand up on your own.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 1:26 pm

The more you sit, the less physically active you are, which can lead to all sorts of health problems, including an early death.

But too much sitting increasingly looks like a health risk all its own. Researchers at Northwestern University say that for people 60 and older, each additional hour a day spent sitting increases the risk of becoming physically disabled by about 50 percent — no matter how much exercise they get.

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Black History Month: #AfroGlobal
11:47 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Stromae's Lyrics 'Show A Different Vision Of The World'

Belgian music sensation Stromae acts as a mannequin in the music video for "Papaoutai."
Benjamin Brolet Universal Music France

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 1:42 pm

Paul Van Haver — the son of a Belgian mother and a Rwandan father — was raised by his mother in a French-speaking suburb of Brussels. He rarely saw his father, and he struggled academically. When his mother insisted he take up an instrument, he chose the drums.

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Can I Just Tell You?
11:47 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Michael Dunn And Miami Dolphins Show It's Time To Step Up

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 1:09 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
11:47 am
Wed February 19, 2014

'Loud Music' A Case Of 'Testosterone, Guns, And Florida'

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 1:09 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Record
11:31 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Computer Love: Beats Music Wants To Be Your Everything

Beats Music

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 3:21 pm

I have a new streaming music service in my life. Let's call him Beatsy. It's an open relationship — I'm still accessing other music streams, and Beatsy's positively promiscuous, winning the hearts of the music press and thousands of trial subscribers. But I don't mind. When I'm with Beatsy I feel special. Yes, he is a computer program — the world knows him as Beats Music, just one of many services that make it possible for me to listen to music stored in its cloud library via my phone or computer.

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Health Care
10:47 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Red State Hospitals Pressured To Care For The Poor Without More Medicaid

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 1:09 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to start the program today talking about health care. When the Affordable Care Act was created, it required every state to expand its government-funded Medicaid programs - that's the program that provides health insurance to low-income people - but a 2012 Supreme Court ruling declared that the federal government cannot require states to expand their Medicaid programs.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:42 am
Wed February 19, 2014

We Love Him For More Than Twizzles: Charlie White Plays Violin, Too

Ice dancing champions Meryl Davis and Charlie White visit the set of the NBC TODAY Show in Sochi on February 18, 2014.
Scott Halleran Getty Images

It's no secret that gold-winning American ice dancers Meryl Davis and Charlie White have become favorite faces in Sochi. But it turns out that the charming White has done his share of woodshedding along with his hard work on the ice.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Dr. Seuss's Private Hat Collection Is Quite A Sight

Dr. Seuss collected hats like this plastic toy Viking helmet for over 60 years.
The Art of Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss's personal hat collection is on tour for the first time in history. An exhibit called Hats Off to Dr. Seuss!, which debuted at the New York Public Library in January last year, will stop in six states over the next seven months.

The exhibit features 26 unique and historic hats from Dr. Seuss's collection, along with his original artwork inspired by the collection.

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The Two-Way
10:10 am
Wed February 19, 2014

U.K. Court OKs Detention Of Reporter Glenn Greenwald's Partner

Glenn Greenwald, left, and David Miranda after Miranda's arrival at Rio de Janeiro's International Airport on Aug. 19, 2013. Miranda had been detained for nine hours at London's Heathrow Airport. Authorities questioned him about Greenwald's reporting of the "NSA leaks."
Ricardo Moraes Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 10:26 am

British authorities were within their rights to detain journalist Glenn Greenwald's partner for nine hours last August and to seize an external hard drive containing classified documents leaked by Edward Snowden, three high court judges in the U.K. have ruled.

David Miranda, who lives with Greenwald in Brazil, was stopped at London's Heathrow Airport last August as he was making his way home from Europe.

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World Cafe
9:22 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Ha Ha Tonka On World Cafe

Ha Ha Tonka.
Frank Hill Courtesy of the artist

The Missouri-based band Ha Ha Tonka's unusual name pays tribute to the Ozark region — it's the name of a state park. The four-piece visited our World Cafe studios to play music from its latest album, Lessons. During our chat, singer and songwriter Brian Roberts explained some of the many things that trigger his creativity, including this Fresh Air interview with Maurice Sendak.

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Favorite Sessions
9:01 am
Wed February 19, 2014

KEXP Presents: Minor Alps

Juliana Hatfield and Matthew Caws perform live on KEXP.
Charina Pitzel KEXP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:55 pm

Hearing their performance on KEXP, you'd think that super-duo Minor Alps had played for audiences together many times, but this effortless, stripped-down set of lyrically poignant songs was their first live performance — ever.

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The Edge
8:45 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Finnished! Russian Hockey Team Bounced Out Of Olympics

Russian fans who gathered in Sochi's Olympic Park react with dismay as they watch a broadcast of the ice hockey match between Russia and Finland.
Shamil Zhumatov Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 6:33 pm

"Uskotko ihmeisiin?"

No, this isn't exactly a "do you believe in miracles?" bit of history for Finland, but its men's hockey team just produced a moment-to-remember at the Sochi Games.

Finland beat Russia 3-1, bouncing the home team out of the tournament.

As NPR's Robert Smith has reported, there was tremendous pressure on Alex Ovechkin and his Russian teammates to win gold in Sochi.

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Kitchen Window
8:38 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Once Exotic, Now Ubiquitous, Bananas Deserve A Bunch More Respect

Laura B. Weiss for NPR

What's more American than apple pie? It's that familiar yellow-skinned fruit that, well, we all go bananas over.

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The Two-Way
7:56 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Nun Who Broke Into Nuclear Complex Gets 35-Month Jail Term

Anti-nuclear activists (from left) Gregory Boertje-Obed, Sister Megan Rice and Michael Walli, pictured Feb. 6 in Knoxville, Tenn., were sentenced to prison terms on Tuesday for the 2012 break-in at Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge.
Linda Davidson The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 10:15 am

"An 84-year-old Catholic nun was sentenced Tuesday to nearly three years in prison for breaking into a nuclear weapons complex and defacing a bunker holding bomb-grade uranium, a demonstration that exposed serious security flaws at the Tennessee plant," The Associated Press writes from Knoxville, Tenn.

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Field Recordings
7:28 am
Wed February 19, 2014

On A Chilly Factory Floor, Yuja Wang's Piano Sizzles

Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 9:16 am

Chinese-born pianist Yuja Wang isn't one to do anything in half measures. So when we invited her to record a performance in a room at the Steinway & Sons piano factory, she showed up in Queens that frigid morning with her A game.

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Code Switch
6:45 am
Wed February 19, 2014

'Crypto-Jews' In The Southwest Find Faith In A Shrouded Legacy

Rabbi Stephen Leon leads a Friday night service at B'nai Zion synagogue in El Paso, Texas. Leon has converted crypto-Jews in the region.
Courtesy of Peter Svarzbein/ mongovision.com

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 11:32 am

Code Switch has been writing about some overlooked cultural interactions that have helped shape what Jewish identity is today, and we continue the series with this post about the murky and fascinating history of crypto-Jews in the Southwest.

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The Edge
6:31 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Team USA's Ted Ligety Wins Gold In Giant Slalom

Ted Ligety of Team USA celebrates Wednesday after winning the men's giant slalom event at the Sochi Winter Games.
Hans Klaus Techt EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 7:10 am

Ted Ligety is now only the second American to ever earn two Olympic gold medals in Alpine skiing after finishing first Wednesday in the giant slalom at the Sochi Winter Games.

As USA Today writes:

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Around the Nation
6:20 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Wisconsin Rubber Duck Bill Waits For Governor's Signature

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 6:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Duck Derbies are very popular in Wisconsin. And because they involve placing bets on rubber duckies dropped into a fast-moving river, they are technically illegal, though not for long. Wisconsin lawmakers passed a bill yesterday exempting rubber duck high-rollers from a ban on gambling. Participants in the Ducktona 500 in Cheboygan Falls can now breathe easy as they put a few dollars on Lucky Duck number seven. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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