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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Economy Grew Less Than Thought As 2013 Came To A Close

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 9:32 am

The U.S. economy grew at a 2.4 percent annual rate in fourth-quarter 2013, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said Friday, as it significantly cut its estimate of how much gross domestic product grew during the last three months of the year.

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Monkey See
7:25 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: The Oscars Omnibus Of 2014

NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 10:41 am

  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

Sunday night, the Oscars will come around once again, and we'll be watching. But before we do, we got together with All Things Considered film critic, silly video partner, emoticon learner and all-around great pal Bob Mondello to talk about all nine of the Best Picture nominees: American Hustle, Dallas Buyers Club, Nebraska, Philomena, Her, Wolf Of Wall Street, 12 Years A Slave, Gravity, and Captain Phillips.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Book News: Author Criticizes S.C. School Funding Cuts Over Gay-Themed Books

Alison Bechdel is the author of the graphic memoir Fun Home and the comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For.
Elena Seibert Courtesy Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Alt.Latino
7:03 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Saudade: An Untranslatable, Undeniably Potent Word

Gilberto Gil, pictured here on the cover of Luar (A Gente Precisa Ver o Luar), is one of the many artists we listen to this week to understand the concept of "saudade."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 1:27 pm

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Music Articles
7:03 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Music Takes Center Stage In Oscar-Nominated Documentaries

Egyptian singer-songwriter Ramy Essam, in the heady early days at Tahrir Square in 2011.
Mark LeVine Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 9:06 am

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The Two-Way
6:53 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Mt. Gox Files For Bankruptcy; Nearly $500M Of Bitcoins Lost

A bow and an apology: Mark Karpeles, CEO of Mt. Gox, was contrite at the start of a news conference in Tokyo on Friday in which it was announced that the firm has filed for bankruptcy.
Kyodo Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 3:07 pm

The scope of the collapse of what once was the world's largest bitcoin exchange took shape Friday when Mt. Gox filed for bankruptcy protection in Japan, saying it had lost track of nearly $480 million worth of the virtual currency.

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The Two-Way
6:04 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Crisis In Ukraine: Gunmen At Airport; Yanukovych Vows To Return

On Friday, armed men took control of the international airport in the city of Simferopol, on the Crimean peninsula. Gunmen took control of another airport in Crimea, as well.
David Mdzinarishvili Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:28 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Kiev
We'll be adding updates as the day continues.

The crisis in Ukraine took another ominous turn when gunmen in unmarked military uniforms on Friday took control of two airports on the Crimean peninsula — where the majority of people are ethnic Russians and many want to break away from the new government in Kiev.

Update at 5:15 p.m. ET: Obama Warns Russia On Ukraine

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Fri February 28, 2014

The Count Of Many Mistresses: Alexandre Dumas' Lively Life

For this second installment of the NPR Books/Code Switch Black History Month project, we asked the legendary Kyle Baker — his work includes Why I Hate Saturn, and stints on the X-Men, Deadpool and Plastic Man — to illustrate one of his literary inspirations. Baker chose Alexandre Dumas, creator of the Three Musketeers — whose life was almost as eventful as his fiction. We recommend you click on the enlargement to get the full effect of all the detail!

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Around the Nation
5:42 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Police Not Amused By Leashed Tiger Out For A Walk

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 6:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

OK, stop me if you've heard this one before. A man walks into a bar with a tiger. People swear that's what happened at Uncle Richie's in the Chicago suburb of Lockport this week. Sure, the tiger was little and on a leash but, according to, WBBN TV, police didn't think a tiger out for an evening walk was very funny at all. The owner is facing misdemeanor charges. He runs a place called the Big Run Wolf Ranch where he keeps mountain lions, tigers and wolves, oh my.

Movies
4:21 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Oscar Swag Bag Valued At $85,000

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 6:27 am

The Oscars are this Sunday, and Hollywood stars will flock to the red carpet with hopes of getting an Academy Award. But even those who don't get a trophy, still get a pretty nice consolation prize.

Economy
4:21 am
Fri February 28, 2014

CBO Assesses Affordable Care Act's Economic Effects

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 6:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Friday, this is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

The Affordable Care Act will change the way millions of Americans think about their jobs. That's essentially what the Congressional Budget Office has said in its assessment of the law's effect on the economy. They think the law will give some people the option to retire early and others the flexibility to work less.

As NPR's John Ydstie reports, this is already happening.

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NPR Story
4:21 am
Fri February 28, 2014

13 Workers Exposed To Radiation At N.M. Nuclear Waste Dump

A hunk of salt from the underground nuclear waste dump in Carlsbad, New Mexico. A piece of salt is believed to have fallen from a cavern ceiling and crushed drums of waste.
Meg Vogel/NPR

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 12:21 pm

There's never a good week for nuclear waste, but this week has been a particularly bad one. Officials at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico have disclosed that 13 employees inhaled radioactive material after a major accident earlier this month.

While there's no risk to the public and the exposed workers did not need immediate medical treatment, the incident is shaping up to be a major setback for the nation's only dedicated nuclear waste dump.

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NPR Story
4:21 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Action Hero Liam Neeson Stars In 'Non-Stop'

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 6:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now any day of the week is a good time to watch Liam Neeson play an action hero. He famously chased down bad guys and blew things up in the movie "Taken" and its sequel a few years back. Los Angeles Times and MORNING EDITION film critic Kenneth Turan has this review of "Non-Stop," Neeson's latest action flick.

KENNETH TURAN: "Non-Stop" is a crisp, efficient thriller that benefits from the intangibles Liam Neeson brings to a role.

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NPR Story
4:21 am
Fri February 28, 2014

On Broadway, Thursday Is The New Wednesday.

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 6:27 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On Broadway, Thursday is about to become the new Wednesday.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG FROM THE MOVIE, "PHANTOM OF THE OPERA")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing in a foreign language)

GREENE: Several shows, including the "Phantom of the Opera," plan to move their traditional Wednesday matinee to Thursday. Wednesday afternoon performances have never been huge money makers, and some Broadway executives think Thursday matinees will draw in tourists coming for a good long weekend in New York.

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Shots - Health News
2:31 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Connecticut Looks To Sell Its Obamacare Exchange To Other States

Kevin Counihan, CEO of Connecticut's health insurance exchange, hopes to be able to market their expertise.
Jeff Cohen/NPR

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:14 am

Kevin Counihan, the CEO of Access Health CT, is walking through the 15th floor of a downtown Hartford office building that houses Connecticut's health insurance marketplace. He passes the legal department, the IT folks and the consultants, then stops in front of three large, wall-mounted computer screens.

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All Tech Considered
2:30 am
Fri February 28, 2014

A Smartphone That Tries To Slip You Off The Grid

The Blackphone, an Android software-based mobile, encrypts texts, voice calls and video chats.
Albert Gea Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 9:24 am

Mike Janke used to be a Navy SEAL sniper. These days he's taking on the government and corporate America. He's the founder of Blackphone, an Android-based smartphone with privacy as its main selling point.

It's not NSA-proof — in that everything is hackable if you try hard enough. But Janke says it's taking on the entire mobile economy that lets law enforcement and companies in way too easily.

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Planet Money
2:28 am
Fri February 28, 2014

An Old Law, A Snowy Winter, And A Modern-Day Salt Shortage

Jay Field MPBN Radio

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:38 am

There were so many winter storms in New Jersey this year that the state nearly ran out of the salt used to melt snow and ice on the roads.

State officials thought they had found a solution when they discovered an extra 40,000 tons of rock salt for sale up in Searsport, Maine.

The state bought the salt but ran into problems getting it to New Jersey — despite the fact that there was an enormous, empty cargo ship, sitting at the Searsport port, headed down to Newark.

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Oscars 2014: The 86th Annual Academy Awards
2:27 am
Fri February 28, 2014

A Cowboy Stunt Double Who Made The Stars Look Good

Dean Smith, doubling as Maureen O'Hara, with stuntman Lee McLaughlin on the set of McClintock!
Courtesy of the Smith Family

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 2:25 pm

For 40 years, Dean Smith made his living as a stunt double in Hollywood Westerns — including eight Oscar winners and nominees — like True Grit, The Alamo and How The West Was Won.

"I was able to make all the leading men look good," Dean tells his wife Debby in an interview with StoryCorps. And not just men, he adds.

"One time, I doubled [as] Maureen O'Hara. I got the clothes and I got this big red wig. When I got back on the set, they laughed at me and they said my legs didn't look too much like Maureen's," he laughs.

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Parallels
2:25 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Secretary Of State Kerry Says Ukraine Is Not A 'Cold War Story'

An anti-Yanukovych protester walks past a barricade in Independence Square, the epicenter of the country's current unrest, in Kiev, Ukraine, on Wednesday.
Emilio Morenatti AP

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 9:49 am

Ukraine's ousted president, Viktor Yanukovych, emerged Friday to give a news conference on Russian soil, not far from the Ukraine border. Russia is not only giving Yanukovych shelter — it's also carrying out military exercises that have raised alarms in Washington.

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The Salt
2:21 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Drought Could Dry Up Nevada Dairy Farmers' Expansion Plans

There are about 2,000 dairy cows on Pete Olsen's fifth-generation farm in northern Nevada. A new milk processing plant is now putting pressure on Olsen and other dairy farmers to expand the size of their herds. But with the ongoing drought, farmers are struggling to get enough feed for the cows they already have.
Kirk Siegler/NPR

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 2:13 pm

When Pete Olsen talks about drought on his fifth-generation dairy farm in Fallon, Nev., he's really talking about the snowpack 60 miles to the west in the Sierra Nevada.

The Sierras, Olsen says, are their lifeblood.

That is, the snowmelt from them feeds the Truckee and Carson rivers and a tangle of reservoirs and canals that make this desert bloom. Some of the highest-grade alfalfa in the world is grown here. And it makes perfect feed for dairy cows, because it's rich in nutrients.

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Oscars 2014: The 86th Annual Academy Awards
2:20 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Keen Eyes, Uncanny Instincts Keep Films In Sharp Focus

On location for Walk of Shame, camera crew members Larry Nielsen (center) and Milan "Miki" Janicin (right) help set up a crane shot. The wireless focus remote Nielsen will use is hanging from that purple carabiner on his jacket.
Cindy Carpien NPR

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 1:41 pm

You won't believe it — I didn't — but the person responsible for keeping each and every shot of a movie in focus never looks through a camera lens.

"No," says focus puller Baird Steptoe. "We do not look through the camera at all."

Steptoe has worked as a first assistant cameraman on films from The Sixth Sense to Thor to last year's Grownups Two. He says he's learned to judge distances — precise distances — with his naked eye alone.

"I mean, I can tell you roughly from you to me right now," he says. "I would say about 2-11."

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Oscars 2014: The 86th Annual Academy Awards
2:19 am
Fri February 28, 2014

Oscar Glow, Today's Tech Help Short Films Find Their Fandom

One of this season's Oscar-nominated shorts is Mr. Hublot, a French-language animated film about a reclusive man who must learn to adapt to a new housemate — a robot dog.
Zeilt Productions

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:53 am

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Movie Reviews
6:39 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Mouse, Meet Bear, And Let's All Make Friends

A bear named Ernest, voiced by Forest Whitaker, befriends the young mouse Celestine, voiced by Mackenzie Foy, even though their societies forbid it.
Gkids

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 12:26 pm

Animated movies excel in bringing to life the impossible stories, the ones drawn from fairy tales and mythology and the ones exploring the imaginary lives of creatures and things. It's an incredibly attractive notion, isn't it, to imagine there's a whole world going about its business, just out of sight?

The French-Belgian animated film Ernest & Celestine takes on that idea twice over, investigating the fictional lives of bears and mice, two societies living side by side, utterly intrigued by and terrified of each other.

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It's All Politics
5:54 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Clintons Provide Firepower Behind DNC 'Voter Expansion Project'

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and former President Clinton huddle under an umbrella during inaugural ceremonies for Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe in Richmond on Jan. 11.
Patrick Semansky AP

Democrats believe they've discovered a way to play more offense against Republican efforts that have had the effect of making it harder for many voters — especially young, senior and minority citizens — to cast their ballots.

Their answer: a new initiative, announced by the Democratic National Committee at its winter meeting in Washington, aimed at countering voter ID and other laws and practices that can dampen voting.

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The Two-Way
5:12 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Yellen Acknowledges Weaker Economic Data; Markets Rally

Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen gestures as she testifies during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing while delivering the Federal Reserves semiannual Monetary Policy Report on Capitol Hill Thursday.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Citing "softness" in the U.S. economy, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen told a Senate panel today that the Fed will try to determine if the results are a new trend or are related to this winter's intense cold and storms. Analysts are seeing her comments as signaling a potential shift in the "tapering" of the Fed's stimulus program.

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Code Switch
4:46 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

New Academy President Pushes For More Diverse Voting Members

Cheryl Boone Isaacs is the first black president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and only the third female president.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 6:57 pm

For the first time, this year's best director Oscar could go to a Mexican (Alfonso Cuaron, for Gravity) or a black Brit (Steve McQueen, for 12 Years a Slave). That film's lead actor, Chiwetel Ejiofor, is also in the running for an award; so is his Kenyan co-star Lupita Nyong'o, who was born in Mexico. This year's nominees are diverse, but the people who vote for the Oscars are not.

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Around the Nation
4:46 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Telework: Not Just For Moms And Millennials

New research finds that 3 out of 4 remote workers are men.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 11:37 am

Many people may think of a "remote worker" as a harried mom in her bathrobe or a 20-something at a coffee shop. But that image doesn't actually reflect who is working outside the office, according to a new study.

"A remote worker, someone who does most of their work outside of their employer's location, is not a woman, is not a parent and is not a Gen-Y millennial," says Cali Williams Yost, a workplace flexibility strategist and CEO of the Flex+Strategy Group.

A Remote-Working Gender Gap

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World Cafe
4:27 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Butch Walker on World Cafe

Butch Walker.
Taylor Boylston Courtesy of the artist

Our guest today is songwriter and producer Butch Walker. After successful releases with the band The Marvelous 3 in the '90s, the Georgia native started getting recognized for his production skills. Since 2000, he has balanced producing people like Pink and Katy Perry with his own work.

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Shots - Health News
4:26 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Young Doesn't Mean Invincible When It Comes To Strokes

A third of adults who have had a stroke before age 50 have a hard time caring for themselves or living independently.
iStockphoto

Strokes sounds like an old folks' problem, but they hit young people, too. And they don't all shake it off. One-third of people who had a stroke before age 50 are struggling with disability and loss of function nine years later.

Many of those people aren't able to live independently or need help with everyday tasks, such as managing their finances or personal care, a study of young stroke survivors finds. About 1 in 8 wasn't able to live independently.

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The Two-Way
4:25 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Boom: Amazing Soccer Goal Comes On Game's First Play

Harrison High School junior Andrew Deltac blasts a kick from 67 yards out to score in the opening seconds of a recent soccer game.
YouTube

If there's a quicker goal in the history of soccer, we don't know about it. On the opening kick, a Georgia high school player received the ball in his own end – and the ball didn't touch the ground again until it crashed into the back of the net, 67 yards away.

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