Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

A new analysis of data from Fukushima suggests children exposed to the March 2011 nuclear accident may be developing thyroid cancer at an elevated rate.

But independent experts say that the study, published in the journal Epidemiology, has numerous shortcomings and does not prove a link between the accident and cancer.

This is a landmark week in West Africa. For the first time since the Ebola outbreak, there were no new cases reported in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

There are many unsung heroes who deserve credit for this milestone. One of them is Dr. Boie Jalloh, age 30. Ten days after he showed up for his medical residency at 34th Military Hospital in Freetown, Sierra Leone, he received a letter requesting his presence at the hospital's newly constructed Ebola unit.

Parents who are uneasy about their own math skills often worry about how best to teach the subject to their kids.

Well ... there's an app for that. Tons of them, in fact. And a study published today in the journal Science suggests that at least one of them works pretty well for elementary school children and math-anxious parents.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., is suing the manufacturers of an exercise band that he says failed and caused him to lose vision in his right eye in January.

If you asked me the scariest place I've ever been, I would instantly say the Democratic Republic of Congo, formerly Zaire, whose cruel past has led to a disastrous present. I'll never forget lying in my hotel bed and hearing the nightly machine gun fire on the nearby streets. And this was during peacetime, not during Congo's two largely ignored wars of the 1990s and early 2000s that killed three times as many people as the current wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria combined.

There's a lot of worry about nearsightedness in children, with rates soaring in Southeast Asia as populations become more urban and educated. But maybe it also has something to do with how much Mom and Dad make you hit the books.

Firstborn children are 10 percent more likely to be nearsighted than latter-borns, according to a study published Thursday in JAMA Ophthalmology. And they're 20 percent more likely to be severely myopic.

Spencer Stone, one of three Americans who thwarted a terror attack on a Paris-bound train this summer, was stabbed early Thursday morning in Sacramento, Calif., according to an Air Force spokesman.

On the release date for his new album, B'lieve I'm Goin Down, Philly rocker Kurt Vile brought together a group of musicians he called the "best of the East Coast and West Coast combined," including drummer Stella Mozgawa from Warpaint, to play a live session for KCRW. It marked the live debut of "Life Like This," a highlight from Vile's most introspective and confident album yet.


  • "Life Like This"

British artist Andy Goldsworthy works in the fields and forests near his home in Scotland using natural elements as his media. His pieces have a tendency to collapse, decay and melt, but, as he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "It's not about art. It's just about life and the need to understand that a lot of things in life do not last."

This post was updated at 4:25 p.m.

In a shocking move Thursday afternoon, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., pulled out of the race for speaker of the House, throwing the GOP leadership race into chaos and confusion.

According to Republican congressmen coming out of the caucus meeting — where lawmakers were expected to pick a successor to retiring House Speaker John Boehner — McCarthy told Republicans he didn't have a path to victory.

In a stunning turn of events, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., has withdrawn from the race to become the next speaker of the House.

McCarthy was the favorite ahead of Thursday's closed-door vote by House Republicans. He was in a three-way race for the top spot in the House with Reps. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Daniel Webster, R-Fla.

Tomorrow, Oct. 9, would have been John Lennon's 75th birthday. So for this week's Throwback Thursday we're sharing a live webcast we did about The Beatles back in February of 2003. At the time, police in Amsterdam had just discovered a bunch of incredibly rare tapes that were stolen from The Beatles and had been missing for 30 years. So we had author Bruce Spizer in to talk about the newly recovered recordings. Bruce wrote The Beatles On Apple Records, and his conversation with host Bob Boilen dug deep into the Beatles' legacy and explained the history of the lost tapes.

The Thistle & Shamrock: Harlaw

Oct 8, 2015

Music has carried the story of the Battle of Harlaw through six centuries. Fiddler Bonnie Rideout led a gathering of musicians to record ancient music of the Scottish battle. Travel back in time with them and music historian John Purser, who tells listeners about this legendary conflict.

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Chris Stapleton On Mountain Stage

Oct 8, 2015

Chris Stapleton appears on Mountain Stage, recorded live in Charleston, W.Va. Originally from Kentucky, Stapleton has spent the past 15 years working his way through Nashville's ranks to become one of the scene's most respected and in-demand songwriters. He's written No.

"Thelonious Monk is the most important musician, period," Jason Moran says. He laughs out loud. "In all the world. Period!"

Moran is in a dressing room deep within the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., where he's the artistic director for jazz. He's not really wearing that hat at the moment, though. He's talking as a musician himself — and very personally, at that.

Michael Horn, the CEO of Volkswagen's U.S. business, appeared before members of Congress on Thursday to answer questions about the German automaker's use of software in its diesel vehicles to fool emissions tests. VW has said some 11 million vehicles worldwide have the software.

Horn testified on the same day German prosecutors raided offices at Volkswagen's headquarters in Wolfsburg and elsewhere, seizing documents and records as they investigate the emissions scandal.

Updated at 1:57 p.m. ET.

Corrections officials in Oklahoma used the wrong drug to execute Charles Warner back in January.

A bill proposed Wednesday by two U.S. senators would require drugmakers and medical device manufacturers to publicly disclose their payments to nurse practitioners and physician assistants for promotional talks, consulting, meals and other interactions.

These are critical days for the presidential campaign of Jeb Bush.

The former Florida governor has been traversing Iowa this week, in effect reintroducing himself to voters, with the first-in-the-nation caucuses in that state now less than four months away.

This is not where Bush and his advisers expected to be when he got into the race early this year. Back then he was quickly labeled the front-runner — the man to beat.

No one calls Bush that anymore, with the topsy-turvy, crowded GOP field and its outsiders named Trump, Carson and Fiorina sitting atop the polls.

The Sorrow And The Pity

Oct 8, 2015

In the critically acclaimed Rocky III, Mr. T uttered the immortal line, "I pity the fool," and a catchphrase was born. In this game we ask our contestants to channel their best Mr. T impersonation and answer questions about things that rhyme with "fool." I pity the spool!

Heard in The Milk Carton Kids: No Expiration Date

No Expiration Date

Oct 8, 2015

Like Simon & Garfunkel, the legendary folk act they're often compared to, The Milk Carton Kids have a timeless quality to them. But the duo didn't start their careers working together.

Guitarist Joey Ryan first met Kenneth Pattengale at the latter's solo show in Los Angeles.

Elementary My Dear Emma Watson

Oct 8, 2015

Ever notice how Hollywood is always trying to spruce up old films? They colorize black and white movies, reboot franchises, and now it turns out they're inserting celebrities into famous lines! We give clues from a film plus celebrity names for our contestants to combine.

Heard in The Milk Carton Kids: No Expiration Date

Alone, Together

Oct 8, 2015

Dave Chappelle walks down the "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" and Bobby Fischer meets Eleanor Rigby in this musical game about well-known recluses. Jonathan Coulton sings clues about famously solitary people set to songs about being alone.

Heard in The Milk Carton Kids: No Expiration Date

Disney Uncensored

Oct 8, 2015

It turns out that fairytales aren't all glass slippers and singing woodland creatures. In this game we uncover the dark secrets behind Disney's beloved animated films. We give a summary of the original story — guess the title of the watered-down Disney version.

Heard in The Milk Carton Kids: No Expiration Date

Opposites Attract

Oct 8, 2015

The word "sanction" can mean both "to approve or permit" and "to punish." Weird, huh? It's an example of a contronym: a word that can be its own opposite, or have two contradictory meanings.

Heard in The Milk Carton Kids: No Expiration Date

I Saw The Seinfeld

Oct 8, 2015

In this game we put our VIPs, The Milk Carton Kids, on the same team. Kenneth describes famous Seinfeld catchphrases to Joey, who must guess the line. But there's a catch: Kenneth has never really seen Seinfeld.

Heard in The Milk Carton Kids: No Expiration Date

The Most Important Quiz Of The Day

Oct 8, 2015

West Egg on a Seabiscuit with Lady Marmalade―yum! For our final round, every correct answer is a word, phrase, or proper noun that contains the name of a breakfast food or beverage.

Heard in The Milk Carton Kids: No Expiration Date

The past several years have seen something of a resurgence of European crime fiction in the United States. It's no secret that the genre is massive overseas, in Scandinavia and especially France, where roughly one in five books sold is a crime novel. The success of books like Alex, the first thriller by popular French author Pierre Lemaitre to be translated into English, further demonstrates that Americans are catching the bug.

A day after the Russian navy fired cruise missiles at targets in Syria — and two days after Russia's warplanes veered into Turkey's airspace — NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg says the alliance "is able and ready to defend all allies, including Turkey, against any threat."