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Author Interviews
4:24 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

In 'Fatherland,' A Daughter Outlines Her Dad's Radicalization

Courtesy of Liveright Publishing

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 11:12 am

How's this for a sweet post-World War II love story?

A man, far from his home country, places a personal ad in a newspaper back home for a pen pal. A pretty girl starts writing back. They fall in love. She moves overseas to be with him. They have three beautiful children and a charming house in Canada.

Then she finds out he's part of a Serbian nationalist terrorist organization preparing to bomb targets around North America.

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My Big Break
4:24 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

How'd A Cartoonist Sell His First Drawing? It Only Took 610 Tries

After moving back home, Tom Toro didn't know what to do with his life. But a stack of magazines at a used book sale gave him an idea. "There they were," Toro says. "Cartoons in among the articles."
Courtesy of Tom Toro

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 8:43 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Tom Toro didn't always dream of becoming a cartoonist at The New Yorker. Sure, he drew cartoons in college, but he didn't see that as a career path. Instead, he went to film school at NYU.

Then he came to the sudden realization that he was in the wrong field — and he had no idea what he was going to do.

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The Two-Way
3:58 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

Got $15 Million? Actor Rowan Atkinson Has A Car For Sale

Rowan Atkinson gestures during an interview in 2007. The famous British comedian who plays Mr. Bean is selling his McLaren F1 race car.
Alex Grimm AP

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 5:31 pm

Mr. Bean is selling his car.

No, not the lime green British Leyland Mini that was the prop for so many of the character's antics. We're talking about the purple McLaren F1 "supercar" owned by the actor who plays Mr. Bean, Rowan Atkinson. It's the same car that Atkinson famously wrapped around a tree in 2011.

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The Two-Way
2:07 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

Ukraine's President Hopes To Revive Shattered Peace Process

Ukraine's president Petro Poroshenko speaks at a meeting of the National Security and Defense Council (NSDC) of Ukraine on Sunday.
Mykola Lazarenko ITAR-TASS/Landov

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 5:37 pm

Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko says he will "calm" fighting between his forces and Russian-backed separatists in the country's east a day after rocket fire killed 30 people in and around the port city of Mariupol.

Poroshenko, speaking after an emergency meeting of Ukraine's security council, said reviving a shattered peace deal agreed in September was the only way out of the conflict.

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The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Sun January 25, 2015

Obama Proposes New Protections For Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

A polar bear walks in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.The Obama administration is proposing new protections in the region that would ban mining and drilling.
Subhankar Banerjee AP

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:03 am

The Obama administration is proposing new protections for large portions of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The U.S. Department of Interior says it's the first time it's recommended additional protections and that their new recommendations have the potential to be one of the largest conservation measures "since Congress passed the visionary Wilderness Act over 50 years ago."

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The Two-Way
10:17 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Several Killed In Egypt Amid Clashes Marking Anniversary Of Uprising

Protester chant slogans in downtown Cairo, Egypt, on Sunday to mark the fourth anniversary of of the 2011 uprising that toppled President Hosni Mubarak. Several people have been killed in clashes with security forces.
Hassan Mohamed AP

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 5:33 pm

At least nine people are dead in the Egyptian capital following clashes between police and Islamist protesters marking the fourth anniversary of 2011 uprising that ousted then-President Hosni Mubarak.

The Associated Press said nine people had been killed, but Reuters and ITV News put the figure at 11. Both agencies cited unnamed security officials.

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Sun January 25, 2015

'Blizzard-Like' Conditions Set To Hit Northeast

A forecast map issued by NOAA's Weather Prediction Center shows the possibility of heavy snow for parts of the northeast beginning Sunday.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 5:36 pm

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

Parts of the U.S. northeast are bracing for as much as 2 feet of snow as a blizzard-like system bears down on the region.

The strong system could leave significant snowfall on the ground from Philadelphia to Maine beginning late tonight and continuing through Tuesday.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio urged residents of the city to expect unusually icy conditions and to "look out for your fellow New Yorkers ... check on them." Long Island could get 24 inches of snow, forecasters said.

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StoryCorps
8:59 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Losing A Soul Mate And A Pillar Of St. Louis' Trans Community

Shane Fairchild (left) tells his friend Sayer Johnson that his late wife, Blue Bauer, was "the only person I ever met that ever treated me like I was me."
StoryCorps

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 8:19 am

StoryCorps' OutLoud initiative records stories from the LGBTQ community.

Shane Fairchild's wife, Blue Bauer, was "very rough around the edges," he says: "Blue was 6-foot tall, weighed about 230 pounds, had red hair and brown eyes, had been a trucker all of her life," Fairchild tells their friend Sayer Johnson during a StoryCorps interview in St. Louis, Mo.

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The Two-Way
8:39 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Anti-Austerity Leftists Win Greek Election

Alexis Tsipras, center, leader of Greece's Syriza left-wing main opposition waves to his supporters after voting at a polling station in Athens on Sunday.
Petros Giannakouris AP

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:12 am

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

Greece's radical left Syriza party has become the first anti-austerity party to win elections in Europe, throwing into doubt whether the troubled country stays the course on an international austerity plan.

The party fell just short of an absolute majority, NPR's Joanna Kakissis reports for our newscast unit, and will have to work with another party to govern.

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It's All Politics
8:33 am
Sun January 25, 2015

A GOP Weekend, Courtesy Of The Koch Network And Citizens United

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, leaves the stage after speaking at the Iowa Freedom Summit on Saturday in Des Moines, Iowa.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 1:59 pm

Republican presidential hopefuls are turning out this weekend for two big events, but just one of them, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, plans to be at both.

Cruz is among seven possible contenders who spoke Saturday at the Iowa Freedom Summit, co-sponsored by Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, and the group Citizens United. Sunday night, Cruz is scheduled to join two possible primary rivals, Sens. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Rand Paul, R-Ky., at a semi-annual conference of the Freedom Partners Chamber of Commerce.

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The Two-Way
7:18 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Suspected Boko Haram Militants Attack Another Nigerian Town

An official stands in front of relief materials at a camp for displaced people in Maiduguri in Borno State last week. The town, where many have gathered after fleeing Boko Haram attacks, is now said to be under assault from the Islamist extremist group.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 9:58 am

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

In the latest attack by the suspected Boko Haram extremists in Nigeria, militants shelled the northeastern city of Maiduguri, Reuters reports, quoting witnesses.

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Secret Lives Of Teachers
7:13 am
Sun January 25, 2015

'Walking The Walk' With Students ... And Screaming Fans

Elementary teachers Nicola Berlinsky, Joanie Pimentel and Lisa Pimentel perform as the punk band No Small Children.
Michael Dann

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 9:52 am

The NPR Ed team is discovering what teachers do when they're not teaching. Artist? Carpenter? Quidditch player? Explore our Secret Lives of Teachers series.

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Health
7:04 am
Sun January 25, 2015

The Potential Impact Of Big Data On Medicine

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:22 am

Some researchers say big data could change the way medical research is done and the way individual doctors make medical decisions. Others say it raises too many questions when it comes to medicine. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on Jan. 5.)

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sunday Puzzle
7:03 am
Sun January 25, 2015

A Puzzle Full Of Air

Sunday Puzzle
NPR

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 8:59 am

On-air challenge: Every answer today is a word starting with the letters A-R, which you will identify from its anagram. For example, given AR plus ROB, the answer would be "arbor."

Last week's challenge: Name two animals, both mammals, one of them domestic, the other wild. Put their letters together, and rearrange the result to name another mammal, this one wild, and not seen naturally around North America. What mammal is it?

Answer: dog + gnu = dugong

Winner: Michael Kurh, Geneva, Ill.

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World
7:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

To Save Birds, Send A Ship Full Of Rat Poison

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 8:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
7:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Super Bowl Talk (Other Than Ball Deflation)

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 8:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
7:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Virtual Games Try To Generate Real Empathy For Faraway Conflict

Allison Begalman, a student at the University of Southern California, wears goggles and headphones to experience a virtual mortar strike on civilians in Aleppo, Syria.
James Delahoussaye NPR

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 6:47 am

Video games are great for passing time or battling monsters with friends online. But the medium is also being used to explore complex stories and themes. It's even being used as form of journalistic storytelling, immersing people in places and events that can be hard to imagine.

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Parallels
7:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Piece By Piece, Monks Scramble To Preserve Iraq's Christian History

Father Najeeb Michaeel shows off one of the many Christian manuscripts he saved from Iraq's Christian libraries.
Alice Fordham NPR

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 1:40 pm

In an unfinished building in the northern Iraqi city of Erbil, displaced Christian children sing a little song about returning to their village. "We're going back," they sing, "to our houses, our land, our church."

Right now, they're living in an open concrete structure. The self-styled Islamic State, or ISIS, took over their home village of Qaraqosh, and the Christians fled in fear, on foot.

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Music Interviews
7:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

The Lone Bellow, A Trio Built On Harmony And Trust

The Lone Bellow's latest album is Then Came The Morning.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 8:59 am

Singing in harmony is an intimate exercise, not least because it often requires singers to change their voices in order to better blend with their counterparts. Kanene Pipkin grew up harmony singing, but says the first time she sang with her bandmates in The Lone Bellow, she noticed something unusual: She didn't need to alter her voice at all.

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Music Interviews
7:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Dengue Fever: Retro Pop, Cambodian Style

Dengue Fever's latest album is The Deepest Lake.
Marc Walker/Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 9:47 am

The late 1960s and early '70s defined a vibrant, electrifying and psychedelic era for rock music everywhere — including Cambodia. The Khmer Rouge communist movement put an end to that when it took power in 1975, but the music from that era has been discovered and rediscovered over the years.

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Global Health
7:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Mistrust, Anger Holds Guinea Back From Fighting Ebola

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 8:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movie Interviews
7:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

At Its Core, Warped Family Drama 'Mommy' Is 'A Story Of Love'

Antoine-Olivier Pilon plays 15-year-old Steve in Xavier Dolan's Mommy.
Shayne Laverdière Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 8:59 am

French-Canadian filmmaker Xavier Dolan's new film, Mommy, won the Jury Prize at last year's Cannes Film Festival — an achievement for any director, let alone one who's just 25 years old.

The "mommy" in the movie is the fast-talking, hard-drinking widow Diane, or "Die" for short. She's trying to get back on her feet when her teenage son, Steve, is kicked out of yet another psychiatric institution. He moves back home, leaving both Die and the audience on edge, waiting for his next uncontrollable — and usually violent — emotional eruption.

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Time Machine
6:03 am
Sun January 25, 2015

For A Taste Of Grimdark, Visit The 'Land Fit For Heroes'

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 2:01 pm

"Well, irony really does better unelaborated, but if you insist."

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Book News & Features
6:03 am
Sun January 25, 2015

In Winter, Keeping Warm With Beloved Books

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 8:36 am

For many of us, winter is a time for turning inward, for quelling fears, for resolving to stay warm and alive, or just for remembering that there is so much ahead to wonder over. And though at times it can just feel bleak and bloody awful, the season can be an invitation of sorts, a call to take heart.

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Poetry
5:29 am
Sun January 25, 2015

In 'Dear Father,' A Poet Disrupts The 'Cycle Of Pain'

Atria Books

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 8:56 am

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The Two-Way
2:18 am
Sun January 25, 2015

U.S. And India Announce New Ties On First Day Of Obama's Trip

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Obama meet at Hyderabad House in New Delhi on Sunday, the first day of Obama's three-day trip to India.
UPI Landov

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 11:03 am

Updated at 8:25 a.m. ET

President Obama announced Sunday that the U.S. and India have made progress on civilian nuclear trade. In a joint news conference with Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi, Obama said the countries had agreed to more cooperation in other areas as well, including defense and climate change.

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Research News
5:14 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

Study Says Creativity Can Flow From Political Correctness

As the U.S. workforce continues to become more diverse, researchers are now more than ever examining diversity and bias in the work place.
iStockphoto

There is a common belief that requiring the use of "politically correct" language in the workplace stifles creativity.

Michelle Duguid, a professor at Washington University in St. Louis, tells NPR's Arun Rath that, intuitively, that assumption makes sense.

"People should be able to freely think, throw any crazy ideas, and any constraint would actually dampen creativity," Duguid says.

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Shots - Health News
4:39 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

'How Do You Tell Your Kids That You've Got Alzheimer's?'

When he was 59 years old, Greg O'Brien was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Five years later, he is speaking publicly about his experience, even as his symptoms worsen.
Courtesy of Greg O'Brien

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 4:16 pm

This is the first in a series, "Inside Alzheimer's," about the experience of being diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

In 2009, 59-year-old Greg O'Brien was a successful journalist and writer living in Cape Cod. He was healthy and happy — he exercised every day, made a good living, spent time with his three children and wife.

But he had also started to notice changes in himself. He was forgetting things, and his judgment sometimes seemed to fail him. Meanwhile, his own mother was dying of Alzheimer's disease.

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Sports
4:02 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

Former Wrestlers Sue, Say WWE Ignored Injuries

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 6:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Two fighters who used to perform for World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE, are suing the company, alleging that it ignored signs of brain damage. NPR's Jasmine Garsd has more.

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Latin America
4:02 pm
Sat January 24, 2015

For U.S. And Cuba, A Slow Walk To Re-Establishing Ties

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 12:08 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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