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Television
11:49 am
Wed May 6, 2015

The Allure Of Gore: 'Walking Dead' Producer On Zombies And Mean Tweets

Andrew Lincoln plays Rick Grimes in The Walking Dead.
Frank Ockenfels 3 AMC

The AMC series The Walking Dead, about a band of survivors in a zombie apocalypse, is known for killing off characters without much warning. But while the show's sudden plot twists keep viewers engaged, they can also create explosions of fan grief and rage on social media. Much of the audience's ire has landed on Scott M. Gimple, the series' executive producer and this season's showrunner.

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Maryland Governor Lifts State Of Emergency In Baltimore

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has ended a state of emergency in Baltimore imposed after the riots and looting that followed the funeral of Freddie Gray, the black man who, after his arrest, suffered a spine injury and died a week later.

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All Songs Considered
11:41 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Songs We Love: Pale Honey, 'Over Your Head'

Pale Honey's self-titled debut album is out now.
Courtesy of the artist

Tuva Lodmark and Nella Daltrey, the pair of 22-year-old Swedes who together make up the minimalist-rock duo Pale Honey, have been making music together since elementary school. Their latest music is quite spare – they turn it up every now and then with some great distortion, but usually it's simple, propulsive synth lines paired with strummed guitar and an understated beat. They remind me of The xx with a slightly elevated pulse.

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It's All Politics
11:34 am
Wed May 6, 2015

The Race Where Race Didn't Matter

The Staten Island prosecutor who was at the heart of the investigation into the death of Eric Garner at police hands last year was overwhelmingly elected to Congress Tuesday night.

In the special election in New York's 11th District to replace disgraced former Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., Republican District Attorney Daniel Donovan cruised to a nearly 20-point win over the Democratic nominee, New York City Councilman Vincent Gentile.

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All Songs Considered
11:33 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Songs We Love: Jeen, 'Everywhere I Go'

Jeen O'Brien's debut solo album, Tourist, is out June 30th.
Courtesy of the artist

Singer Jeen O'Brien has been around for a while, making music with a number of artists. She and Brendan Canning of Broken Social Scene are in a band together called Cookie Duster. Don't ask me what a cookie duster is — I have no idea.

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The Two-Way
11:26 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Vatican Affirms Plan To Make Missionary Junipero Serra A Saint

Pope Francis will canonize Junipero Serra this fall. This weekend, the pope met with rector of the Pontifical North American College James F. Checchio (left), Cardinal Marc Ouellet (right) and Joseph Edward Kurtz, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.
Andrew Medichini AP

Pope Francis will canonize Spanish missionary Junipero Serra during his visit to the U.S. later this year, the Vatican says, affirming a plan that has drawn criticism over Serra's role in the California mission system of the 18th century.

After announcing his decision in January, Francis didn't wait for the traditional approval of a second miracle before moving ahead with canonizing Serra, whom the pope has praised for his zeal.

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NPR History Dept.
10:31 am
Wed May 6, 2015

4 Hot-Button Kids' Books From The '50s That Sparked Controversy

NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 11:33 am

The 1950s was a hinge decade for noteworthy and nation-changing civil rights events across the United States, including Brown v. Board of Education in Kansas, the bus boycott in Alabama and the National Guard-protected integration of Central High School in Arkansas.

Meanwhile, there was also a revolution brewing in bookstores and public libraries.

By design or by happenstance, a handful of children's picture books were focal points of the American movement toward integration in the '50s.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:31 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Flower Songs: A Springtime Opera Puzzler

Mezzo-soprano Anita Rachvelishvili sings amid a massive field of poppies in a Metropolitan Opera production of Borodin's Prince Igor.
Cory Weaver Metropolitan Opera

Spring finally seems to have arrived with an abundance of flowers. In the old poem, it's April showers that bring May flowers. But in opera, flowers pop up for a variety of reasons, and not all of them are pretty. While operatic flowers can be enjoyed for their beauty, their allure can also spell trouble. This springtime fleurs de l'opéra puzzler includes some lovely blossoms you might not want to sniff. Score high and come out smelling like a rose. Score low and feel yourself wilt with inadequacy.

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The Thistle & Shamrock
10:23 am
Wed May 6, 2015

The Thistle & Shamrock: Westward

This week's show includes music from Capercaillie, a traditional folk band from western Scotland.
Courtesy of the artist

On this week's episode of The Thistle & Shamrock, hear wild fiddle music and singing in the language of the Gael. Music from western places in Ireland and Scotland is the music of lonely, rugged mountainsides and sea-swept coastlines.

Click the audio link to hear music from Capercaillie, Flook, Niamh Parsons, Peatbog Faeries and more.

World Cafe
10:13 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Lady Lamb On World Cafe

Lady Lamb.
Rich McKie WXPN

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It's All Politics
10:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Clinton Charms DREAMers On Immigration

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton spoke Tuesday with DREAMers including Juan Salazar (second from right) and Astrid Silva (left). "I will fight to stop partisan attacks on the executive actions that would put DREAMers — including many with us today — at risk of deportation," Clinton said.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 11:47 am

When it comes to energizing Latino voters, a group of young people who can't even vote plays an outsized role.

They are known as DREAMers — undocumented immigrants, brought to the country by their parents when they were kids.They were so named for meeting the requirements under the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act proposal that would have created a pathway to citizenship for them. Now they're a political force.

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Monkey See
10:01 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Amy Schumer Puts Her Own Looks On Trial

Front: Chris Gethard, Nick Di Paolo, Vincent Kartheiser. Back: Henry Zebrowski, Paul Giamatti.
Comedy Central

On the fantastic advice podcast Judge John Hodgman, one of the things Hodgman always says in getting litigants to relay their stories is that "specificity is the soul of narrative." Specificity is also the soul of parody, as we saw Tuesday night on Inside Amy Schumer, when Schumer and her crew devoted the entire episode to a detailed parody of the film 12 Angry Men

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The Two-Way
9:59 am
Wed May 6, 2015

U.S. Approves Ferry Service From Florida To Cuba

A taxi driver steers his classic American car along the Malecon at sunrise in Havana, Cuba.
Desmond Boylan AP

The United States issued licenses for ferry service between the United States and Cuba for the first time in five decades.

The South Florida Sun-Sentinel reports the Treasury Department issued at least four licenses to companies that want to establish ferry service to Cuba from Key West, Miami, Fort Lauderdale and perhaps even Tampa.

The paper reports:

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Mountain Stage
9:57 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Todd Burge On Mountain Stage

Todd Burge.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Todd Burge appears on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the West Virginia Culture Center Theater. Host Larry Groce has introduced Burge many times as "West Virginia's premier singer-songwriter" — praise Burge does not take lightly. Drawing on his peculiar wit, nimble guitar playing and the occasional inclusion of ukulele, whistling and falsetto vocals, Burge's music conjures everyone from Tiny Tim to Richard Thompson, often in the same verse of a single song.

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All Songs TV
9:55 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Bandit, 'The Drive Home'

A still from Bandit's "The Drive Home."
Derek Scearce Courtesy of the artist

Bring a nice camera if you're going to Iceland. That's the setting of the gorgeously shot video for "The Drive Home," the opening track to Bandit's debut album, Of Life.

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The Two-Way
9:46 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Baltimore Mayor Asks Feds To Investigate Police Department

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has asked the Justice Department to open up a civil rights investigation into the city's police department.

"Such an investigation is essential if we are to build on the foundation of reform," she said during a news conference.

Over the past couple of weeks, Baltimore has seen near-daily protests over the death of Freddie Gray, who suffered a fatal spine injury in police custody. Those protests boiled over into a night of riots.

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Favorite Sessions
9:46 am
Wed May 6, 2015

World Cafe Presents: Lady Lamb

Lady Lamb performs live on World Cafe.
Rich McKie WXPN

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Book Reviews
9:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

In 'Subprimes,' Swiftian Satire Hits Close To Home

Courtesy of Harper

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 10:56 am

In his new novel, The Subprimes, Karl Taro Greenfeld charges in where most of us would fear to tread. Carol Burnett could have warned him. "It's almost impossible to be funnier than the people in Washington," she once said, but Greenfeld tries his darnedest. He wants to skewer a certain political mindset, and he goes at it with anger, wicked humor and verve.

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The Two-Way
8:05 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Afghan Judge Sentences 4 Men To Death Over Mob Killing Of Woman

An Afghan judge sentenced four men to death over the mob killing of a woman who was falsely accused of burning a Koran.

As NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Kabul, the brutal death of Farkhunda was captured on video and prompted outcry over violence against women in the country.

Soraya says that eight other men were given lengthy prison sentences, but 18 others were found innocent and released.

Soraya spoke to a university student who carried Farkhunda's coffin. She said that the sentences make her believe that Afghanistan is making some progress.

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All Songs TV
7:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Christopher Paul Stelling, 'Hard Work'

Courtesy of the Artist

Christopher Paul Stelling is a brilliant fingerpicker with a message: "I know my work is never done, 'til I can see the good in everyone." That's the heart of his new song, "Hard Work," and the setting for this live, one-take performance couldn't be simpler: his tiny NYC kitchen. The song comes from his stirring album, Labor Against Waste, which is out on June 16.

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Around the Nation
7:02 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Despite Being Stabbed, Pizza Deliverer Follows Through On Order

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 7:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
6:45 am
Wed May 6, 2015

World War II Vet Fights Robber Off With His Cane

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 7:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book Reviews
6:09 am
Wed May 6, 2015

After 'Life,' 'A God In Ruins' Picks Up The Epic Tale Of The Todds

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 9:38 am

The moment in Kate Atkinson's A God In Ruins when protagonist Teddy Todd lies to his granddaughter about an old photograph isn't a grand climax. It happens in passing, in half a sentence: She asks about the stain on an image of Teddy and his long-dead wife Nancy. It's actually the blood of one of his World War II air crew, who died in his arms after their plane was shot down. But Teddy claims it's tea, "not because she wouldn't have been interested but because it was a private thing."

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The Two-Way
6:07 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Germanwings Co-Pilot May Have Rehearsed Crash On Earlier Flight, Report Finds

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 10:07 am

The Germanwings co-pilot who crashed a passenger jet into the French Alps may have practiced the crash during an earlier flight.

According to a preliminary report issued by French investigators, Andreas Lubitz set the altitude dial to 100 feet several times during an outbound flight from Duesseldorf, Germany, to Barcelona on March 24.

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Space
5:50 am
Wed May 6, 2015

How NASA's Space Race Helped To Integrate The South

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 7:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:40 am
Wed May 6, 2015

California Regulators Adopt Unprecedented Water Restrictions

Mountain tops in Sierra Nevada, normally covered in snow this time of year, are seen nearly barren, near the Sequoia National Park during an aerial survey of the snowpack done by the California Department of Water Resources.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Saying state officials and residents simply haven't done enough to curb water use, California regulators unanimously approved unprecedented water restrictions on Tuesday.

The AP reports:

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Food
5:35 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Panera Is The Latest To Drop Artificial Ingredients From Its Food

A pedestrian walks by a Panera Bread restaurant on June 3 in San Francisco, Calif. Panera Bread is set to remove all artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners and preservatives from its from items on its menu by the end of 2016.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 11:16 am

This news may feel like day-old bread, but here goes: Panera Bread is shaking up the fast-casual eatery world with its announcement to ditch more than 150 food additives by the end of 2016.

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The Two-Way
5:04 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Chicago Set To Create Reparations Fund For Victims Of Police Torture

Stanley Wrice pauses in December 2013 as he speaks to the media with his lawyer, Heidi Linn Lambros (left), and his daughter, Gail Lewis, while leaving Pontiac Correctional Center in Pontiac, Ill. Wrice was released after serving more than 30 years. He claimed for decades that Chicago police detectives under the command of then-Lt. Jon Burge beat and coerced him into confessing to rape.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 11:13 am

The city of Chicago will take a big step today toward closing what Mayor Rahm Emanuel has called one of the darkest chapters in city history, as the city council is expected to approve a $5.5 million reparations fund for victims of police torture.

The fund will compensate victims tortured by notorious former Chicago Police Lt. Jon Burge, and the detectives under his command, between the early 1970s and the early 1990s.

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NPR Story
4:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Baseball's Royals Keep Running Afoul Of Unwritten Rules

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 7:09 am

Copyright 2015 KCUR-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kcur.org/.

NPR Story
4:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

In Kabul, Judge Sentences 4 To Death In Mob Killing Of Woman

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 5:37 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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