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Bourang Ba was a young farmer in Sitacourou — a sleepy village of scattered thatched roof dwellings where cattle chomp on hay in courtyards. Last year, the father of two set out for Europe, leaving behind his son, daughter and young wife, Nialina. Like his two half-brothers who had already migrated to Spain, he hoped to send money home for the family.

Bourang Ba never made it to Europe. He drowned in the Mediterranean en route.

"He wanted to do his bit and provide for his relatives, so he left without telling me," sobs Wassa Ba, Bourang Ba's father.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A day after the Justice Department said a North Carolina law violates the Civil Rights Act, the state House speaker says lawmakers will not meet the DOJ's deadline to respond.

Don't add House Speaker Paul Ryan to the list of Republicans who are, even reluctantly, backing de facto GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

"I'm just not ready to do that at this point. I'm not there right now," the party's 2012 vice presidential nominee said in an interview on CNN's The Lead with Jake Tapper.

The Wisconsin Republican signaled he would eventually like to support Trump, who became the GOP's likely White House nominee this week after both Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich withdrew from the race.

Facing a cash shortage, Zimbabwe’s central bank governor John Mangudya announced Thursday that the bank will begin printing its own version of the U.S. dollar. Zimbabwe has already been using the U.S. dollar after abandoning its own currency in 2009 because of hyperinflation.

Now the bank will print bond notes that will have the same value as their U.S. dollar equivalents. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with economics journalist Ali Velshi about what’s behind the change.

Fundraising walks, like the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure and the AVON Walk to End Breast Cancer, attract millions of participants and raise tens of millions of dollars.

The species known as Brood V cicadas will soon come out in parts of Ohio, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia, after being underground for 17 years. These periodical cicadas have an inborn molecular clock. They will emerge when the temperature is 65 degrees Fahrenheit at eight inches beneath the ground.

Chris Simon, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Connecticut – Storrs, talks to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the fascinating history and behavior of cicadas.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Inspiration in Hollywood movies is often a matter of one plucky individual taking on a "system" and winning. For the Brits, such triumphs come deeply embedded in class, region, and national pride, and winning is neither guaranteed nor especially prized. The wonderful 2014 drama Pride re-enacted a gratifyingly improbable, real-life alliance between gay Londoners and displaced Welsh miners during the bruising national strike of 1984.

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