WUIS Xponential

WUIS Xponential

The members of Minnesota's Hippo Campus may be young, but these art-school graduates take music seriously, and their star has been rising since a well-regarded appearance at SXSW earlier this year. Hippo Campus performed new songs from its forthcoming EP, South, during a recent KCRW appearance — including this song, "Dollar Bill."

SET LIST

  • "Dollar Bill"

Review: Royal Headache, 'High'

Aug 5, 2015

Soul and punk are rarely cozy with each other, but at their best, both deal in raw emotion that shoots straight for the gut. That similarity isn't always obvious when comparing the two genres, but when one band combines them, the connection can be bracingly clear. Australia's Royal Headache is that kind of band. The music is pure garage-punk, but the singer — known simply as Shogun — bleeds heart-on-sleeve soul. More crooner than screamer, albeit sometimes both at once, he transforms his bandmates' rushing energy into emotive, Motown-worthy poetry.

First Listen: CFCF, 'The Colours Of Life'

Aug 5, 2015

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Review: Teen Daze, 'Morning World'

Aug 5, 2015

When British Columbia musician Teen Daze appeared with his bedroom-recorded 2010 debut, Four More Years, the title of that eight-song cassette might have seemed presumptuous. Five years later, Teen Daze has matured musically and covered new ground. Credited to a twentysomething named Jamison (no surname given), Teen Daze began to post more and more music online, with efforts like My Bedroom Floor and Beach Dreams suggesting comfortable intimacy in his sound.

This story has been set to unpublished due to the NPR API updating this story earlier and now the NPR API is unavailable. If the NPR API has deleted or changed the access level of this story it will be deleted when the API becomes available. If the API has updated this story, the updated version will be made available when the NRP API becomes reachable again. There is no action required on your part. For more information contact Digital Services Client Support

This story has been set to unpublished due to the NPR API updating this story earlier and now the NPR API is unavailable. If the NPR API has deleted or changed the access level of this story it will be deleted when the API becomes available. If the API has updated this story, the updated version will be made available when the NRP API becomes reachable again. There is no action required on your part. For more information contact Digital Services Client Support

The first weekend of August saw the coronation of a new King of Hip-Hop. Like all transitions of power, it had been years in the making and orchestrated by powers both seen and unseen.

Seattle hip-hop duo Macklemore & Ryan Lewis released a new song today, their first since 2012 blockbuster The Heist. "Growing Up" is not being marketed as a lead single for any upcoming project; according to the pair's publicist, it's "a personal moment of expression" from rapper Ben Haggerty and producer Lewis. (The chorus is sung by Ed Sheeran.)

Anderson East On World Cafe

Aug 5, 2015

The Thistle & Shamrock: Dear Jean

Aug 5, 2015

Hear from a broad assortment of folk musicians as they celebrate Jean Ritchie (1922-2015) by singing the songs she taught them and passing along their wisdom. Much of this week's music comes from the commemorative compilation record Dear Jean, which includes tributes from Robin and Linda Williams, Peggy Seeger, Kathy Mattea, John McCutcheon and many of the late singer's friends.

Gloom can be thrilling. No, really. Rev up a morose guitar riff swirled in reverb with a mean rhythm section, and suddenly a dank basement show throbs. That's where Cleveland's Pleasure Leftists thrive, with former members of the hardcore bands 9 Shocks Terror and Homostupids joined by vocalist Haley Morris.

After a series of singles and EPs, "Protection" comes from the post-punk band's debut album, The Woods Of Heaven. It's a moody, relentlessly driving track with some glammy, palm-muted flair, spun out of orbit by a warbly bass line and vocals that wail sky-high.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Luluc, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2015

Aug 5, 2015

Though they hail from Melbourne, Australia, these days Zoë Randell and Steve Hassett of Luluc live part-time in Brooklyn. And perhaps it's splitting time between their two homes that gives the duo's music a wandering, wistful quality. New York seeps into Luluc's songs in other ways, too. "Tangled Heart," from their breakthrough album, Passerby, is an intimate snapshot of life as an artist in the city.

It's a story that could have been taken from a breaking news report: A soldier, gravely wounded in a brutal battle, flees the fighting to try and make his way home. Only this story is set during the Civil War.

The Metropolitan Opera is poised to make a big change.

When the fall production of Verdi's Otello opens next month, its lead character will not be wearing the traditional blackface-style makeup.

The Met tells NPR by email that its upcoming production of Otello will be the first without dark makeup since the company first produced the opera in 1891.

"They want to know if he's still got it..."

Crooks On World Cafe

Aug 4, 2015

World Cafe's guest today is a Texas-style, hard-rocking country band. Based in Austin, Crooks formed in 2007 as a duo that played folk and country; in the years that followed, it developed a bolder and louder honky-tonk sound. You can hear that sound on Wildfire, just out, and in this studio session recorded for World Cafe.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Partnerships between well-known musicians often result in unequal collaborations: One voice, usually the singer's, winds up dominating. So it's refreshing to hear "Return To The Moon," the first released song by a project called EL VY.

Look at the liner notes to any record by The Go-Betweens, and every song is co-credited "R. Forster/G. McLennan." Perhaps it was out of mutual respect, perhaps it was out of creative solidarity, but as with "Lennon/McCartney," fans of the Australian rock band could always tell who wrote what song; Grant McLennan and Robert Forster's distinct songwriting, vocal and guitar personalities were always on full display.

It's a fool's errand to shorthand the diverse well of techno and house energy at the heart of Tom Demac's "The Shuttle Awaits," the latest in a flurry of singles the North Wales-reared, Manchester-hardened Londoner's been dropping for Aus and Hypercolour the past few years. His music clicks multiple genre boxes without pandering to any of them: hard, and as potentially minimal, as a brick; funky in that druggy, delinquent, energizing way U.K.

Lou Barlow has always been a restless - often anxious - old soul. In three decades of making music, first with Dinosaur Jr., later with Sebadoh and Folk Implosion, the guitarist and songwriter has tried to make sense of his place in the world with a prolific run of spare, emotionally raw, and plain-spoken songs.

When Gustav Mahler said a symphony "must be like the world. It must embrace everything," I suppose he meant embracing accordions, too.

Gustav Mahler's sprawling Ninth Symphony is a 90-minute journey brimming with the joys of life, haunted by death and with a lot happening along the way. Accordionist William Schimmel has squeezed this immense musical canvas down to just 6 1/2 minutes. That takes some guts.

World Cafe Next: The Wooden Sky

Aug 3, 2015

Six albums in, World Cafe catches up with the Toronto band The Wooden Sky for this segment. The group, led by singer-songwriter Gavin Gardiner, has a new album called Let's Be Ready. The Wooden Sky describes its own music as "fuzz folk," which you can hear for yourself in the World Cafe: Next podcast, available on the show's Tumblr.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Jonathan Edwards On World Cafe

Aug 3, 2015

Jonathan Edwards has been standing on stages with his guitar, harmonica and clear voice for 50 years. In this session for World Cafe, he does it again. Edwards' new album, Tomorrow's Child, was recorded in Nashville with help from the likes of Alison Krauss and Vince Gill, but his early work — dating back to 1971 — still rings.

Songs We Love: Tom Demac, 'The Shuttle Awaits'

Aug 3, 2015

It's a fool's errand to shorthand the diverse well of techno and house energy at the heart of Tom Demac's "The Shuttle Awaits," the latest in a flurry of singles the North Wales-reared, Manchester-hardened Londoner's been dropping for Aus and Hypercolour the past few years. His music clicks multiple genre boxes without pandering to any of them: hard, and as potentially minimal, as a brick; funky in that druggy, delinquent, energizing way U.K.

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