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Updated at 6:02 p.m. ET with analysts' comments and additional details

The rumor that YouTube would once and for all put some of its endless content behind the paywall has perpetuated for quite a while, and finally the plan is the real deal.

Google, YouTube's parent, on Wednesday revealed the new subscription service, ambiguously called "Red," which will give people a way to watch videos without those buzzkill commercials — for $9.99 a month.

On our most recent episode of All Songs Considered I noted that Sharon Van Etten can be heard on a new ad for Corona beer, and that a number of my favorite musicians have sold their songs for commercials.

On this week's All Songs Considered, Robin starts the show with a question: What bands have you discovered and fallen in love with from commercials? His first pick, Chairlift, has come a long way since its 2008 ad for the Apple iPod Nano.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Son Little's music can be a little tricky to classify. One writer called him Sam Cook in outer space.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "YOUR LOVE WILL BLOW ME AWAY")

SON LITTLE: (Singing) Runaway, this afghan kush we're bubbling won't burn away.

These days, virtually every type of music imaginable is at our fingertips nearly anytime, anywhere. But for decades, getting that kind of access meant trekking to an actual store, where the store buyers were tastemaking kings. Throughout much of the 1980s, and especially during the CD boom of the '90s, Tower Records locations across the U.S. were meccas for music fans.

Actor Colin Hanks — Tom's son — loved Tower so much, he spent seven years making a documentary about the chain. It's a love letter to Tower Records called All Things Must Pass.

Kevin Gordon On World Cafe

Oct 20, 2015

Originally from Monroe, La., Kevin Gordon grew up loving poetry and punk rock. He pursued the former academically, earning a master's degree from the Iowa Writer's Workshop. Still, he kept playing music and eventually moved to Nashville, where he's written songs that have been recorded by Keith Richards and many others.

The Current Presents: Laura Marling

Oct 20, 2015

Laura Marling's latest album, this year's Short Movie, features a fuller, more plugged-in sound. But when she came to visit The Current's studio, Marling returned to her roots and performed an acoustic set. Inspired by the time the English singer spent in Los Angeles during a songwriting hiatus, Short Movie encourages listeners to embrace spontaneity, as you can hear in this performance of "How Can I."

SET LIST

  • "How Can I"

After releasing one of heavy metal's most polarizing and celebrated albums in years with 2013's Sunbather, Deafheaven faced a question familiar to those bands who've managed to capture that rarest kind of success: What happens now? Maintaining the creative trajectory that had won them adulation from critics and listeners presented enough of a challenge by itself.

So many road anthems pave the history of popular music. Some make poetry of the white lines on the freeway; others floridly celebrate rock and roll fugitives riding the arena circuit on their steel mounts.

Pop singer Garrett Borns, known more commonly by his stage name BORNS, became an instant sensation when his song "Electric Love" went viral earlier this year. The song, hailed as an "instant classic" by Taylor Swift, catapulted BORNS into the national spotlight before he'd even started to prep his debut album. Now, that album, Dopamine, is out. Much like his breakout hit, it looks to capture pleasure, longing and fantasy.

There's a lot of mediocrity to sort through when you hop from one club to another during a festival like the CMJ Music Marathon, five days during which bands flock to New York. So when I find stuff that stands out, that pushes the inevitable evolutionary boundaries of rock, I get really happy.

Metropolis: 10/17/15

Oct 19, 2015

This Week's Playlist

  • Voyeur, "Why" (Madhouse)
  • Ralf Gum, "With Her Hand [Moodymann Remix]" [Feat. Hugh Masekela] (Gogo)
  • Romanthony, "Testify [Wafes Strays Edit]" (Glasgow Underground)
  • Cajmere, "Satisfy [Tiger Stripes Remix]" [feat. Dajae] (Casual)
  • Jay-J & Ron Carroll, "Her Eyes [Jay-J's Shifted Up Remix]" (Shifted)
  • Genius Of Time, "Drifting Back" (Royal Oak)
  • St. Germain, "How Dare You" (Nonesuch)

World Cafe Next: Ben Caplan

Oct 19, 2015

Canadian singer and bandleader Ben Caplan released his first album in 2011 and has been on the road ever since. That might explain why his new record, Birds With Broken Wings, took so long to be recorded and released. Today's World Cafe: Next features two songs from that album, which is due out in November.

Jus Now is a production duo split between the UK and Trinidad & Tobago, 4500 miles apart but with a long legacy of musical exchange. The credit for modern dance music defined as "multicultural" often goes to the communicative power of digital media, but the Jus Now link-up speaks to an older tradition.

When it comes to Mike Krol, it's not three strikes and you're out. For the L.A.-based, Milwaukee-born songwriter, the third time's a charm — or, more to the point, a Turkey. Krol's third album, whose title references the term for bowling three strikes in a row, is a liberating blast of hook-filled garage-rock with smart, reflective lyrics and punkish brevity. (All nine songs span just 19 minutes.)

One For The Ages

Oct 19, 2015

Note: NPR's audio for First Listens comes down after the album is released.

"Some guys have sports cars — I have this."

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and alongside the checks for people who aren't us is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives. This time around: thoughts on music's odd and ever-changing relationship with Canada.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Tyler Childers On Mountain Stage

Oct 16, 2015

West Virginia singer Tyler Childers makes his first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at Charleston, W.Va.'s Culture Center Theater.

Josh Ritter On World Cafe

Oct 16, 2015

Singer-songwriter and author Josh Ritter's new album, Sermon On the Rocks, is out today. It's his eighth studio album since he began recording while at Oberlin College in 1999. Starting with the title, Sermon On The Rocks is filled with biblical references: Classic Bible stories were part of Ritter's upbringing in Moscow, Idaho, and he says those stories provide universal ways to get ideas across.

I've seen Oh Pep! four times in three cities in the past month, and needless to say, the Melbourne band's music is infectious. Oh Pep gets its Oh from Olivia Hally (vocals, guitar) and its Pep! from Pepita Emmerichs (violin, mandolin). These Australians fit well in Nashville during an Americana music festival, as they played fiddles and mandolins alongside guitars, bass and drums. Their harmonies are sweet, with lyrics that are thoughtful, deep, funny and poetic.

Twenty years ago, emo was smack-dab in the middle of its defining years. The Midwestern U.S., in particular, gave us Braid, The Promise Ring, Christie Front Drive, Mineral and Rainer Maria. One of the region's lesser-known, but no less beloved, bands was Kansas City's Boys Life, with its decidedly more abrasive and messy (but also cinematically windswept) sound.

The way we listen to music evolves constantly. From wax cylinder recordings all the way through to today's streaming services, formats have come a long way. What's next? What does this unending metamorphosis say about the music industry? And what does any of this have to do with Robert De Niro?

Mike Connelly has spent most of his musical life in the land of dissonant noise, primarily with his spectacularly cacophonous Kentucky-based trio Hair Police. But there's often been an undercurrent of drama beneath the din, especially during his seven-year stint in the pounding, industrial-tinged Michigan group Wolf Eyes.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is what made Ludovic Navarre famous 15 years ago.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROSE ROUGE")

MARLENA SHAW: (Singing) I want you to get together. I want you to get together.

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