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On this week's All Songs Considered, we've got several new favorites including Bob Boilen's No. 1 discovery of 2016 so far, Lucy Dacus. Robin Hilton shares songs by several artists he thinks are about to release their best albums yet, including Santigold and Ane Brun.

Once upon a time, an artist actually had to sell albums to earn gold or platinum awards from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). But today, the RIAA announced that they're catching up with how fans actually listen to music: On-demand streaming, either on video or audio platforms, counts toward that status.

New Video For PJ Harvey's 'The Wheel'

Feb 1, 2016

When some Western musicians picture life in India, they seem to think you can't turn a corner without someone blasting you in the face with brightly colored powder.

World Cafe Next: Brooke Waggoner

Feb 1, 2016

Brooke Waggoner is like anyone with a day job and a rich other life doing what she really loves: making music. Except Waggoner's day job is in music, too — maybe backing fellow Nashville resident Jack White on keyboards, or fashioning string arrangements for the TV show Nashville.

Metropolis: 1/30/16

Feb 1, 2016

This Week's Playlist

  • Ace Cosgrove, "Making Moves [E24 Edit]" (I.V.)
  • Katy B, Four Tet & Floating Points, "Calm Down" (Rinse)
  • Waterson, "Tell Me [Kda Club Edit]" (Back To The World)
  • Yogs, "Bad Trip"
  • Silversun Pickups, "Circadian Rhythm (Last Dance) [Jason Bentley Remix Dub]" (New Machine)
  • Jamie xx, "Seesaw (feat. Romy) [Four Tet Remix]" (Young Turks)
  • The Chemical Brothers, "Wide Open [feat. Beck]" (Astralwerks)
Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Finding a songwriting voice takes time — and then there's the process of pinpointing the best way to send that voice hurtling through speakers. Palehound's Ellen Kempner has long had the words: scathing and evocative, certain even when swimming in an ocean of doubt. And with every live show, she's finding surer and surer footing as the central force in a band that marries rock muscle to bedroom folk's wiry vulnerability.

Over the past 25 years, there's been no more prominent name in gospel music than Kirk Franklin. In that time, the singer has been no stranger to controversy. By merging hip-hop with gospel, he brought the stars and sound of the club scene into the church — and not everyone in the church has been comfortable with that.

Hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing their country by boat. That's Syria today. It's also Vietnam in 1979.

Saul Williams is a man with a message — and he'll will use any medium available to share that message. As a writer and poet he's published five books, including The Dead Emcee Scrolls: The Lost Teachings of Hip-Hop. As an actor he's appeared in film and television, and recently starred in Holler If Ya Hear Me, a broadway musical featuring the music of Tupac Shakur.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In the winter of 1987, music producer Todd Lockwood was on the lookout for a hot new project to grow his label. Lockwood owned the White Crow recording studio in Burlington, Vt. — and he didn't have to look far to find his bold idea.

That idea? Get Bernie Sanders — then the longtime mayor of Burlington — into the studio to record a few of his favorite songs.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This story has been set to unpublished due to the NPR API updating this story earlier and now the NPR API is unavailable. If the NPR API has deleted or changed the access level of this story it will be deleted when the API becomes available. If the API has updated this story, the updated version will be made available when the NRP API becomes reachable again. There is no action required on your part. For more information contact Digital Services Client Support

Lettuce On World Cafe

Jan 29, 2016

The Brooklyn band Lettuce has been at it for two decades now, mixing funk with hip-hop beats and contributions from guest rappers. Its new album Crush was recorded while the group was on tour, most importantly in New Orleans.

Paul Kantner, who co-founded the psychedelic-rock group Jefferson Airplane and helped define the San Francisco sound in the 1960s with songs such as "Somebody to Love," has died. He was 74.

The guitarist and singer died Thursday following a heart attack earlier in the week, NPR's Tom Cole reports.

Sergio Salvatore On Piano Jazz

Jan 29, 2016

Sergio Salvatore was only 14 when he appeared as Marian McPartland's guest on Piano Jazz 20 years ago, but he was already making the jazz world sit up and take notice. The young composer and pianist is a natural. He's since gone on to partner with virtuoso vibraphonist Christos Rafalides, with whom he released the album Dark Sand.

In this 1996 edition of Piano Jazz, Salvatore solos in his own tune "Revolving Door" and teams with McPartland for "Autumn Leaves."

Originally broadcast in the spring of 1996.

Set List

Vandaveer, 'A Little Time Off Ahead'

Jan 29, 2016

So. Macklemore. I suppose we have to talk about Macklemore.

EL VY: Tiny Desk Concert

Jan 29, 2016

It's fun to see something truly new from someone whose work you love. Matt Berninger came to the Tiny Desk as lead singer of The National a few years ago, but this time he's collaborating with Brent Knopf from the bands Menomena and Ramona Falls. EL VY is their new project, and the two are perfect foils for each other — especially in this intimate setting, which highlights Knopf's playful piano and Berninger's resonant voice.

Jazz has its capital cities: major hubs like New York, Chicago and New Orleans. But the music manages plenty well in many other places, too. What goes into those smaller ecosystems to enable jazz to thrive? How do talented musicians make it happen? In search of some answers, we sought out the DIY concert producers of CapitalBop in Washington, D.C., as they presented artists from the Baltimore-Washington area. And we met with the musicians themselves — in one case, touring the place he calls home.

Shemekia Copeland On World Cafe

Jan 28, 2016

Shemekia Copeland, daughter of the late bluesman Johnny Clyde Copeland, got her start when she first took the stage with him at age 8; she released her first album 10 years later. In this session, she explains that she's always had a powerful voice, but had to learn the subtleties of singing.

In this episode, Copeland performs at WXPN's Free At Noon concert, where she sings songs from her latest album, Outskirts Of Love.

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