WUIS Xponential

WUIS Xponential

Daniel Bachman calls Durham, N.C., home now, but he grew up around the Rappahannock River in Fredericksburg. It's a quiet town in Northern Virginia that still has a pharmacy with cheap sandwiches and milkshakes; but, as Bachman pointed out to us, it has more tattoo parlors than music stores these days. That's not a judgment, just the way things are.

Bruce Lundvall, the longtime President of Blue Note Records who supported many top jazz artists over the last four decades, died yesterday, May 19. The cause was complications of Parkinson's Disease, according to a Blue Note statement. He was 79.

Girlpool, 'Before The World Was Big'

May 20, 2015

Girlpool have fun, but they don't mess around. The lo-fi punk duo spend the duration of their new video, for the title track from their debut LP, Before The World Was Big, cartwheeling and frolicking on a sun-drenched beach. Cares are few, trust falls are many, and a boardwalk Ferris wheel spins majestically over all.

Dr. Dog On World Cafe

May 20, 2015

World Cafe's Sense Of Place: Philadelphia series had to include Dr. Dog. The band formed in 2001 in West Philadelphia, built around the writing skills of Toby Leaman and Scott McMicken.

The Barr Brothers On Mountain Stage

May 20, 2015

Indie-folk band The Barr Brothers appears on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of West Virginia University. After cutting their teeth touring the U.S. as members of The Slip, brothers Andrew and Brad Barr relocated to Montreal and joined forces with classically trained experimental harpist Sarah Page.

This special webcast has ended, but the music continues on I'll Take You There, R&B From NPR Music.

Review: 'Platform,' Holly Herndon

May 19, 2015
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Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF HOLLY HERNDON SONG, "NEW WAYS TO LOVE")

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Hop Along On World Cafe

May 19, 2015

The Philadelphia band Hop Along started out with a folk sound back in 2004, when singer-songwriter Frances Quinlan began recording during her senior year of high school. Hop Along took on more of a rock edge in 2008 with the addition of her brother on drums; the group later added bassist Tyler Long and guitarist Joe Reinhardt.

The Districts On World Cafe

May 19, 2015

Rob Grote, Mark Larson, Connor Jacobus and Braden Lawrence formed The Districts in 2009, while they were still in high school; they released their debut album in 2012 and moved from Lititz, Penn., to Philly shortly thereafter.

Is Amy Helm's new song, "Rescue Me," about what it means to be in love? Maybe. Is it a song that acknowledges that we need to hang on to the people who are most important to us? Most assuredly. It's also a song that lets Helm's glorious, soulful voice soar over a gentle piano and thrumming electric bass.

They've made music together since they were young teens, coming together in Edinburgh from places as far apart as Ghana and Maryland. Young Fathers' hip-hop-infused poetry is intense; you can hear that on the group's new album, White Men Are Black Men Too.

Mary Gauthier On Mountain Stage

May 19, 2015

When Mary Gauthier first began to make a name for herself as a musician in the late '90s, she was heralded as one of the most poignant and powerful songwriters of her generation — an amazing accomplishment for someone who wrote her first song at 35. Originally from New Orleans and currently based in Nashville, Gauthier has battled back from hard knocks and bad habits, bouncing between rehab centers and homeless shelters throughout her teens.

Rone, 'Acid Reflux'

May 19, 2015

If there's one takeaway from this video for Rone's "Acid Reflux," it's this: Don't eat the psychedelic sushi. (Or eat it, if that's your thing.)

Lucifer, 'Izrael'

May 19, 2015

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In his new memoir, Words Without Music, Philip Glass tells the story of how he slugged a man in the jaw in Amsterdam. At a concert, a quarrelsome audience member climbed onto the stage and began banging on the composer's keyboard. That was in 1969, when Glass' repetitious, slowly evolving music fell on many ears like a needle stuck in the groove of a record.

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Review: 'I Can't Imagine,' Shelby Lynne

May 18, 2015
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World Cafe Next: Cayetana

May 18, 2015

The three women who form Cayetana — Kelly Olsen, Allegra Anka and Augusta Koch — made a thrilling debut last year with Nervous Like Me. They're a big part of why Philly's homegrown rock scene has gotten so much attention lately.

Drive-By Truckers On Mountain Stage

May 18, 2015

Drive-By Truckers' members return to Mountain Stage, recorded live in Charleston, W.Va. Mixing alt-country, Southern rock and even punk, the band's enduring sound has long been built around the smart, thoughtful songwriting of founding members Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley. The band is based out of Athens, Ga., though it's worth noting that Hood (son of famed Muscle Shoals bassist David Hood) spent a lot of time in southern West Virginia as a child visiting his grandparents.

Cate Le Bon wrote some of my favorite words of 2013 on her album Mug Museum. White Fence is the swirly psych-like music of Tim Presley. Cate and Tim are friends — Cate played guitar on a tour with White Fence — and so now there's this: DRINKS.

Waxahatchee On World Cafe

May 18, 2015

The Juilliard String Quartet was established in 1946 as an all-purpose quartet that would embrace music from every era. Its founders' intent was to "play new works as if they were established masterpieces and established masterpieces as if they were new."

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"Let's get heavy," Other Lives frontman Jesse Tabish jokes before launching into an explanation of the dichotomies behind the band's new album, Rituals. Conflating old and new styles, while also exploring the balance between humanity's primal nature and an isolating modern world, the Portland-via-Stillwater, Okla., band's densely layered songs still somehow seem light and airy.

For the last two years, pianist Ethan Iverson has been at the center of what looks, in hindsight, like a serious creative whirlwind. He re-conceptualized Stravinsky's ballet The Rite Of Spring in its entirety (!) for his trio The Bad Plus, and then, for good measure, recorded an album of all-original Bad Plus music (Inevitable Western).

Although they share the same last name, it's hard to imagine a less likely pairing than Luz Elena Mendoza and Sergio Mendoza.

While both have roots in Mexico, Luz Elena makes her home in the Pacific Northwest and has fronted a band called Y La Bamba. That group sets Luz Elena's deep, evocative voice against backing vocals so rich, I once described Y La Bamba's other singing members as bearded choirboys. There were direct Mexican influences in the music, but not many.

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In 1967, while still in The Byrds, David Crosby wrote "Triad" about a ménage a trois, inspired by the counterculture notion of "free love." It was left off the band's next album, The Notorious Byrd Brothers, and became a point of contention when Crosby left the band.

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