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Illinois music and the great alternative, rock, folk, soul, blues, reggae artists you've come to love on 91.9-HD3.

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Dena DeRose On Piano Jazz

4 hours ago

Singer and pianist Dena DeRose has performed at some of the most renowned venues in the world, from The Blue Note in New York to Swing Hall in Japan. She has shared the stage with artists including Clark Terry, Ray Brown and Ingrid Jensen. She teaches at the Jazz Institute of the University for Music and Performing Arts in Austria, and continues to perform worldwide.

DeRose was Marian McPartland's guest in this 2001 session. She opens the show with "If I Should Lose You," and McPartland joins for "I'm Old Fashioned."

A Tribute To Artie Shaw On Piano Jazz

4 hours ago

Cornetist and jazz historian Richard "Dick" Sudhalter (1938 – 2008) joined Marian McPartland on several occasions to provide historical perspective on great performers and songs from the golden era of jazz. In 2002, Sudhalter sat down with McPartland to talk about clarinetist Artie Shaw (1910 – 2004). Shaw was known for his unparalleled virtuosity and as a successful bandleader with a limitless imagination.

Piano Jazz honors Shaw with selections including "Love of My Life" and "Any Old Time."

Originally broadcast Spring 2002.

Charles Bradley On World Cafe

5 hours ago

Charles Bradley isn't exactly reviving soul music — the rest of us are just catching up with how he has always sung. The soul singer, who's originally from Brooklyn, saw James Brown on stage at the Apollo in 1962 and was transfixed.

So, this is happening: Some white supremacists have anointed Taylor Swift an "Aryan goddess," claiming that she secretly espouses far-right beliefs and is waiting for Donald Trump's ascension to the presidency to make her true views known.

At some point in the 1960s, steel drum (a.k.a. pan) music became the Caribbean equivalent of cheesy Vegas lounge tunes: something only an ill-dressed tourist might fancy during a cruise ship port o' call. And true, there's probably a thousand bad pan covers of "Yellow Bird" out there, but the tradition is unfairly maligned.

Copyright 2016 WWNO-FM. To see more, visit WWNO-FM.

Join The Thistle & Shamrock host Fiona Ritchie at the Swannanoa Gathering in the North Carolina mountains for more highlights from her many musical encounters at Traditional Song Week.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Quilt On World Cafe

May 26, 2016

The Brooklyn-based band Quilt has really solidified its sound on its new album, Plaza. The band, which was often labeled "psychedelic" when it started in Boston, has written some more straightforward, hooky songs for Plaza.

Liverpool singer Lapsley is a rising star. The 19-year-old self-produced her debut album, and specializes in powerful, soulful vocals buoyed by minimalist electronica. KCRW's current favorite is the ballad "Love Is Blind."

SET LIST

  • "Love Is Blind"

Watch Lapsley's full Morning Becomes Eclectic set at KCRW.com.

When the New York City Opera (NYCO) announced its final performances and imminent bankruptcy in September 2013, opera lovers, not just in Manhattan, were shocked.

It seems like Claude VonStroke's "Who's Afraid Of Detroit?" was destined to be a community anthem from the get-go — even if the folks it ended up repping weren't the same ones it was written for. I first remember watching it make full impact at a long-defunct Brooklyn club called Studio B in January of 2007, where DFA's Tim Sweeney played it as the last record before handing over the decks to a triumphant DJ set by one of Detroit techno's pre-eminent ambassadors, Carl Craig.

Xenia Rubinos arrives without exaggerated hype, but with the kind of artistic vision that sneaks up on you. Her first release came to me from within a big stack of CDs I'd picked up at a Latin Alternative music gathering in New York, and it was clear to me from the first listen that Rubinos heard things differently. Her choice of instruments, sound structure and lyrics all pointed to an artist who, if not fully developed, stood out from the crowd.

The anti-heroic American landscape is cluttered with men moving around. John Updike's Rabbit Angstrom burns down the turnpikes in his shiny American car; John Cheever's Neddy Merrill "swims the county" in his Northeastern suburb, making his way from swimming pool to swimming pool. These embodiments of postwar anomie were soon joined by a cinematic horde: motorcycle hippies, hitchhikers, criminals and others who took the stories of lost boys nationwide.

"Blues with a punk attitude" is the tagline on Fantastic Negrito's website, and it's not an empty slogan. The Bay Area singer-songwriter, a.k.a. Xavier Dphrepaulezz, infuses Last Days Of Oakland with slide guitar drenched in overdrive, not to mention a hard-bitten perspective on life, love, art, commerce, class and society. It's an outlook he's earned.

When we first meet the Street Angel, three tracks into Paul Simon's new Stranger To Stranger, he uses a bebop riff to describe what he does. "I make my verse for the universe ... I write my rhymes for the universities, and I give it away for the hoot of it ... A tree is bare, but the root of it goes deeper than logical reasoning." No one talks to this person, so Simon, longtime champion of underdogs, lends a sympathetic ear.

Nashville instrumental guitarist William Tyler never has to nail down the meaning behind the songs on his new record, because a word never crosses them. But his freedom from explicit meaning is a gift for listeners, as well. These songs stretch out past the limits of most lyrics and approach a rare sense of mystery.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the late 1980s, Moby was drawn to what he calls "the dirty mecca" of New York City. As a DJ and electronic musician, he was a staple of the rave scene: massive crowds dancing until dawn, probably under the influence of a substance or two, all moving as one to his songs.

Songhoy Blues On World Cafe

May 25, 2016

Songhoy Blues started when, displaced from their homes in the north of Mali, members Garba Touré, Oumar Touré and Aliou Touré fled Timbuktu in 2012 and traveled to Bamako, where they decided to form a band to play for fellow refugees. Songhoy Blues' instrumentation — two guitars, bass and drums —represents a younger person's take on more traditional desert-blues bands.

We're guided, derailed and thrown out by passion, and we keep crawling back because it's what we know. Ever since Mike Kinsella started Cap'n Jazz with his brother Tim at age 12, he's lived the musician's life with scattered rewards. But over the last three decades, he's seen how his Chicago bands like Joan Of Arc, American Football and Owls have shaped a thriving and evolving rock scene.

The mountain hamlet of Woodstock in upstate New York was well known as an artists' colony even before the mid-'60s influx of musicians. In fact, it was known well enough among the musicians who lived there, particularly Bob Dylan, that it lent its name to the famous festival that actually took place many miles away.

On this week's episode we've got one of the sunniest bands of all time, mesmerizing music from the Sahara and an elegy to growing old.

Co-host Robin Hilton gets things started with a sweetly sad song from Matt The Electrician, a pop-folk singer based in Austin who no longer has anything to do with his own hands, while host Bob Boilen follows with Esmé Patterson, a singer with roots in folk music and a new album that stretches into the world of gritty rock.

Summer is almost here and you need summer jams. There are always competitors for the title "songs of summer," but when you're sitting on a porch or hanging by a pool, there's no room for competition; you just want a steady string of tunes.

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