Let's Talk Kids

Shots - Health News
2:43 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

When Mothers Get Moving, Children Are More Active, Too

Moms of young children don't have much time to go to the gym. But getting active with the kids is a win all around.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 3:41 pm

Mothers of young children may feel like they don't have much time to exercise, but the more active the moms are, the more active the children.

The activity level of young children is directly linked to that of their mothers, researchers in the United Kingdom say.

But the problem is that mothers with young children aren't very active, says Esther van Sluijs, a behavioral epidemiologist at the University of Cambridge and the study's lead author.

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Shots - Health News
12:28 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Kids Benefit From Counseling At The Pediatrician's Office

Behavior issues like defiance and aggression are common, and short-term counseling can help parents and kids do better.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 1:49 pm

Pediatricians often recommend some mental health counseling for children who have behavior problems like defiance and tantrums. But counseling can be hard to find. Children are much more likely to get help if the counselor is right there in the doctor's office, a study finds.

The children in the study had behavior problems, and many also had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or anxiety. They were 8 years old, on average, and two-thirds were boys.

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Children's Health
10:55 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Florida Responds To Reports Of Child Abuse And Neglect

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 2:20 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to update you on a story that aired on this program last Friday. We heard from the Miami Herald about its investigative series called "Innocence Lost." Reporters there documented nearly 500 children who had some contact with Florida's Department of Children and Families and later died of abuse or neglect. My colleague Jennifer Ludden spoke with writer Audra Burch about how so many children fell through the cracks at the agency.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVAL RECORDING)

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Shots - Health News
4:28 am
Sun March 23, 2014

Doctors Say Don't Give Birth To Baby In A Tub, But Midwives Disagree

Proponents of water birth say it's easier on the mother and more peaceful for the baby.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 1:49 pm

Hospitals are increasingly giving women the option of going through labor or giving birth in a pool of warm water. Laboring in the tub is fine, the nation's obstetricians and pediatricians say, but there's not enough proof that it's safe to actually give birth in one.

The doctors' statement has raised eyebrows among nurse-midwives, who have been helping women deliver in water for decades in order to ease pain and speed delivery.

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Author Interviews
4:23 am
Sun March 23, 2014

'Parentology': Bribes, Behavior And The Science Of Raising Kids

Dalton Conley lives in New York City with his wife and two children.
Stephen P. Hudner Courtesy of Simon and Schuster

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 10:36 am

Raising kids is hard. It just is. And there's a whole industry out there trying to help parents figure out how to do it. There are all kinds of books on the very basics — sleeping, eating and talking — to those that deal with more complicated stuff, like how to teach self esteem and resiliency.

Adding to that aspirational reading list is Parentology: Everything You Wanted to Know about the Science of Raising Children but Were Too Exhausted to Ask, a new book by sociologist Dalton Conley.

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Children's Health
10:14 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Were Hundreds Of Innocent Children Lost?

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 11:34 am

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
9:25 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Teenage Drinkers Go For High-End Liquor And Cheap Beer, Too

A college student reaches for a beer during spring break in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 11:40 am

For underage drinkers, it's not always about the cheapest alcohol they can get their hands on. Many of them are brand conscious, researchers say, and they're not drinking the same stuff as their parents.

Young drinkers do go for sweet malt beverages that mask the taste of alcohol with fruit flavors; 17 percent said they'd had a Smirnoff malt beverage, which comes in flavors like grape and frozen strawberry lemonade.

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Let's Talk Kids
10:59 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Don’t Make Assumptions

The third of don Miguel Ruiz’ “Four Agreements” sounds simple enough:  Don't Make Assumptions.  But the application of this to living with children is not so easy.

When we make assumptions it’s because we believe we know what others are thinking and feeling. When it comes to our children, we blindly assume their lives will mirror our own.   “Of course you love Brussel sprouts!  Everyone in our family loves Brussel sprouts!”

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The Salt
11:31 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Why A Sweet Tooth May Have Been An Evolutionary Advantage For Kids

A new study suggests that a sweet tooth could have evolved as a way to help kids survive by leading them to more calories during key growth spurts.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 1:16 pm

It's no surprise researchers have shown again and again that kids are more likely than adults to spring for something like a bowl of Fruit Loops.

But young kids' preference for extremely sugary foods might be even more biologically ingrained than we thought. Scientists now think that kids' growing bodies may prompt them to crave more sugar — and a child's sweet tooth might be heightened during growth spurts.

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Shots - Health News
3:33 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Teens Say They Don't Text Or Drink While Driving

I'm not really texting. I'm checking my homework assignments.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 10:03 am

Many teen drivers are earnest when they say they know the risks of drinking and driving or texting behind the wheel. But it seems many either ignore those dangers or don't fully understand what it means to drive safely.

About half of teens who say they never text while driving admitted to texting at red lights or stop signs, according to a survey released Tuesday. And while 86 percent of teens consider driving under the influence to be dangerous, one in 10 who say they never drive under the influence actually do drive after drinking.

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#NPRWIT: Women In Tech
10:58 am
Tue March 18, 2014

How Parents Are Leading The Revolution For Girls In Tech

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 12:51 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. This March for Women's History Month, we've been talking with women innovators, entrepreneurs and educators in the STEM fields. Once again, that's science, technology, engineering and math.

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Shots - Health News
3:18 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Doctors Use 3-D Printing To Help A Baby Breathe

Garrett shares a moment with his mother, Natalie Peterson. "He has been doing so good," she says. "He's been smiling."
Nicole Haley/University of Michigan Health System

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 10:59 am

Ever since the day Garrett Peterson was born, his parents have had to watch him suddenly just stop breathing.

"He could go from being totally fine to turning blue sometimes — not even kidding — in 30 seconds," says Garrett's mother, Natalie Peterson, 25, of Layton, Utah. "It was so fast. It was really scary."

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Shots - Health News
4:04 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Parenting In The Age Of Apps: Is That iPad Help Or Harm?

With tablet technology still relatively new, pediatricians are trying to understand how interactive media affects children.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 10:32 am

When it comes to media, parents all want to know: How much is too much for my child?

Dr. Dimitri Christakis, a pediatrician, professor and father of two, has spent a lot of time thinking about the effects of media on young children. Christakis tells NPR's Arun Rath that not all TV is bad.

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The Salt
3:31 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Companies Tap Celebrity Power For Extreme Vegetable Makeover

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 10:31 pm

Marketing to kids may have gotten a bad rap in the past. Especially since children have been the target of so much junk food advertising.

But it's a new day.

Increasingly, companies are seeing profits pushing ultra-healthy stuff. And they're not using a finger-wagging, guilt-ridden, eat-your-veggies-because-they're-good-for-you messaging.

Birds Eye is taking a page from the playbook of other companies that have had success leveraging the power of teen pop stars: The frozen food giant is turning to Disney.

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Shots - Health News
9:11 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Young Women Increasingly Turn To ADHD Drugs

Have daunting to-do lists contributed to the rise in ADHD drug prescriptions?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 6:16 am

Use of ADHD drugs continues to rise in the United States, but the group whose use is increasing the most may come as a surprise: young women.

An analysis of prescriptions filled from 2008 to 2012 through Express Scripts, a pharmacy benefit management company, found that use of ADHD medications rose 35.5 percent overall. The company's database includes 15 million people with private insurance.

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Let's Talk Kids
10:57 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Don’t Take Anything Personally

Last week, I introduced the application of don Miguel Ruiz’ book The Four Agreements to our work of raising children.  Today, I would like to think about the Second Agreement, “Don’t take anything personally,” as it applies to the lives of parents.

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The Salt
9:47 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Advice For Eating Well On A Tight Budget, From A Mom Who's Been There

JuJu Harris is the author of The Arcadia Mobile Market Seasonal Cookbook. A former recipient of government food assistance, she now teaches healthy eating skills to low-income families in Washington, D.C.
Courtesy of Molly M. Peterson

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:47 pm

JuJu Harris didn't set out to write a cookbook, but then again, she didn't set out to accept public assistance to feed her son, either. Harris always wanted to work with nature.

"My dream job was, I was going to grow up and be a national park ranger," she says. It didn't quite work out that way. She drifted from job to job in Oakland, Calif., where she was born. At 32, she joined the Peace Corps, traveling to Paraguay to help local farmers improve their crops.

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Children's Health
12:51 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

In Syria, Not Just Bullets And Bombs Harming Children

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 2:19 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. The standoff in Ukraine may be a central concern of world leaders right now, but it is not the only one. This weekend will mark three years since the protests against the Syrian regime began. That conflict has now ballooned into a full-blown civil war and a devastating humanitarian crisis along with it. And as the fourth year of the crisis begins, the global nonprofit group Save the Children is trying to call attention to the plight of Syria's children.

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Shots - Health News
4:53 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Obesity Linked To Lower Grades Among Teen Girls

In a British study of nearly 6,000 students, obesity — or perhaps dealing with the stigma associated with obesity — seemed to reduce academic performance.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 7:23 am

Childhood obesity has made it to the forefront of public health issues, both in the United Kingdom and in the United States.

Now researchers at the Universities of Dundee, Strathclyde, Georgia and Bristol say that not only does obesity affect a child's overall health, but it may also lead to poorer school performance among teenage girls. Among boys, the link is less apparent.

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Shots - Health News
1:17 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Questions Remain About Whether Doctors Can Curb Children's Drug Use

The exam might also include questions about alcohol and drugs.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 1:20 pm

What can doctors do to help kids stay away from drugs?

There's not much evidence to say one way or the other, it turns out.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which issues guidelines on what doctors should and shouldn't do, said there aren't enough reliable studies around to come up with any solid advice. So the task force gave the interventions an "I" for insufficient evidence. The kids might call it an incomplete.

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Parenting
10:39 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Former Supernanny Jo Frost Takes On Toddler Years

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 3:17 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. Today, we want to focus on the toddler years. They are so cute, and they can be so frustrating. They finally learn words, but that word is often no.

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Children's Health
3:02 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Casinos, Sites Of Excess, Might Actually Help Families Slim Down

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 6:59 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

When you think about casinos, you probably think about excess: smoke-filled rooms, too much alcohol, and endless buffets filled with piles of high-fat and high sugar foods.

But as NPR's Patti Neighmond reports, a new study suggests casinos may actually have a health benefit for children who live in nearby communities.

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Children's Health
11:15 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Why Kids Leave The E.R. With Concussions

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Brain injuries like concussions have got a lot of attention in professional sports lately. But there's also a new focus on concussion in children, especially those who play sports at a young age. A new study suggests that emergency rooms could be doing much more to find and treat concussions in children. It's published online in the journal Pediatrics Today.

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Shots - Health News
6:57 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Second Baby Cleared Of HIV. Rare Event, Or Hope For Others?

While not conclusive, the two cases are "quite promising," says Anthony Fauci, a longtime AIDS researcher who directs the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 7:01 am

In only the second documented case of its kind, an infant born with the AIDS virus may have been cured of the infection, thanks to an intensive drug treatment begun just hours after her birth. The baby girl — now 9 months old — from Long Beach, Calif., is still on that regimen of antiretroviral drugs. But researchers who described her case at an AIDS meeting in Boston this week say advanced testing suggests that she is HIV-negative.

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Let's Talk Kids
10:55 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Be Impeccable with Your Word

In his book, “The Four Agreements,” don Miguel Ruiz laid out four principles based on the great religions of the world and particularly his own Toltec roots in Southern Mexico.   These four agreements, he writes, provide a practical guide to personal freedom and happiness.

His simple ideas also provide a solid foundation for successfully raising our children.  Over the next four weeks, I’d like to explore these four ideas beginning today with the first agreement:  Be Impeccable with your Word.

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Shots - Health News
10:46 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Teens Who Try E-Cigarettes Are More Likely To Try Tobacco, Too

They're both legal. Either, both or none?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 1:01 pm

While electronic cigarettes may be marketed as alternatives that will keep teenagers away from tobacco, a study suggests that may not be the case.

Trying e-cigarettes increased the odds that a teenager would also try tobacco cigarettes and become regular smokers, the study found. Those who said they had ever used an e-cigarette were six times more likely to try tobacco than ones who had never tried the e-cig.

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Shots - Health News
11:34 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Cities Take The Lead In Regulating Electronic Cigarettes

Electronic cigarettes for sale in Vapeology LA, a store in Los Angeles, are tended by owner John Hartigan.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 11:59 am

Count Los Angeles as the latest big city to say no to electronic cigarettes.

The City Council there voted unanimously on Tuesday to ban use of the devices, which release vaporized nicotine, in almost all public places, including bars, workplaces and beaches.

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Parenting
11:02 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Should Kindergarteners Stop Finger Painting And Start Learning French?

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 1:16 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
1:49 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Dunk Now, Pay Later: Elite College Players May Suffer In Middle Age

Duke's Jabari Parker weaves his way through UCLA players during a December game in New York.
Jason DeCrow AP

College athletes astound us with their power and speed, but they can pay a price years later. Division I players are more likely to be disabled, depressed and in pain in middle age, a study finds. And they may end up worse off because they fail to make the switch from high-level competition to the low-level activity of the rest of us.

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Business
2:35 am
Mon March 3, 2014

E-Cigarette Critics Worry New Ads Will Make 'Vaping' Cool For Kids

E-cigarettes was a $2 billion industry last year and it's expected to hit $5 billion this year.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 4:30 pm

Electronic cigarette makers are getting bold with their advertising, using provocative new print ads and celebrity endorsements on TV. But public health advocates say these images are luring kids to hook them on nicotine.

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