Let's Talk Kids

Goats and Soda
5:03 pm
Mon November 10, 2014

A Smartphone Gadget Pumps Up Breast-Milk Banks

Newborn in an incubator at Greytown Hospital in South Africa in 2009.
Wendy Stone Courtesy of PATH

Originally published on Tue November 11, 2014 9:37 am

Breast-milk banks are a great way to help babies whose mothers aren't able to breast-feed. Breast milk, in case you didn't know, does a better job than formula at bolstering a baby's immune system, especially if the tot is premature or underweight.

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Children's Health
4:09 pm
Mon November 10, 2014

Thousands Of Kids Sickened By Laundry Pods That Are Hard To Resist

Originally published on Tue November 11, 2014 11:37 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Detergent pods are dangerous for young children. That's the message out today from a group of poison experts. For the first time, the researchers documented the hazards posed by these increasingly popular products.

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The Two-Way
4:43 am
Mon November 10, 2014

Study: Detergent Pods Can Harm Children Who Play With Them

Laundry detergent makers recently introduced miniature packets, but doctors across the country say children are confusing the tiny, brightly colored packets with candy and swallowing them.
Pat Sullivan Associated Press

Originally published on Mon November 10, 2014 6:58 am

It's generally a good idea to have the number of the poison control center handy. That's an even better plan if you have laundry detergent and small children at home.

For decades, poison centers received many calls each year about children swallowing laundry detergent or getting it in their eyes. That problem has gotten worse due to new highly concentrated single-load liquid laundry detergent packets.

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Shots - Health News
2:03 am
Mon November 10, 2014

Combining The DNA Of Three People Raises Ethical Questions

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Mon November 10, 2014 4:03 pm

In a darkened lab in the north of England, a research associate is intensely focused on the microscope in front of her. She carefully maneuvers a long glass tube that she uses to manipulate early human embryos.

"It's like microsurgery," says Laura Irving of Newcastle University.

Irving is part of a team of scientists trying to replace defective DNA with healthy DNA. They hope this procedure could one day help women who are carrying genetic disorders have healthy children.

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Let's Talk Kids
1:26 pm
Thu November 6, 2014

Let's Talk Kids - "More Love Is a Good Thing"

Credit mattpenning.com 2010 / WUIS/Illinois Issues

The young woman’s faced bloomed with pleasure as she shared, “I love my kids so much!”

Do you imagine she was referring to her own offspring?  No, the kids who inspired this enthusiastic exclamation were the eight children who make up her child care class.

She spends many hours each week with them.  She’s learned what makes each of them tick, and sees them each as individuals brimming with potential.  She knows what will tickle each child’s funny bone, and which small disasters are likely to set each into a crying jag. 

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Shots - Health News
11:31 am
Thu November 6, 2014

Fewer Babies Are Born Prematurely, But Many Still Suffer

The March of Dimes gives the United States an overall "C" grade in preventing preterm births.
Courtesy of The March of Dimes Foundation

The number of babies born too early dropped to 11.4 percent of all births in 2013, the best number in 17 years.

But that's still more than 450,000 children being born too early. Those babies face in increased risk of death, and those who survive are more likely to have problems including intellectual disability, vision or hearing loss, cerebral palsy and breathing trouble.

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The Salt
9:52 am
Tue November 4, 2014

How To Wean Your Kids Off Halloween Candy: Cold, Hard Cash

The scariest part of the holiday comes in the days that follow, as parents fight and negotiate to limit how much candy their kids eat. NPR's Gisele Grayson decided to pay her kids off to give up their loot.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue November 4, 2014 9:34 pm

Like many parents out there, I love Halloween as much as I dread it. The joy the kiddos get from the costumes and candy is balanced by what comes after: the fights and negotiations that go along with trying to limit their sugar intake.

Thus was born my candy buyback program.

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Code Switch
9:35 am
Tue November 4, 2014

'La Chancla': Flip Flops As A Tool of Discipline

NPR Story
3:58 am
Tue November 4, 2014

Apple's Siri Helps Autistic Teen With Communication Skills

Originally published on Tue November 4, 2014 11:35 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We are about to hear from an author who wrote a love letter to a machine. Judith Newman wrote in The New York Times that a talking phone made life easier for her 13-year-old son, Gus, who has autism. Now Judith Newman brings her story to us.

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The Salt
4:21 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Cash For Halloween Candy? Dentists' Buyback Program Is Booming

Dr. Curtis Chan, a dentist in Del Mar, Calif., loads up a truck with 5,456 pounds of candy to deliver to Operation Gratitude during the Halloween Candy Buyback on Nov. 8 last year. Chan personally collected 3,542 pounds of candy from patients.
Courtesy of Curtis Chan

Originally published on Tue November 4, 2014 10:04 am

If your little ghosts and goblins dump their candy on the living room floor tonight, go ahead: Let them at it. They can sort, then trade, and gorge on their favorites.

But if you're like many parents, by tomorrow morning you may want to get rid of some of this candy glut.

One possible solution? Check out the Halloween Candy Buyback program, which was founded by dentist Chris Kammer in Wisconsin. Kammer's office offers $1 a pound to buy back candy collected by the young trick-or-treaters in his practice.

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Shots - Health News
2:42 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Scientists Implicate More Than 100 Genes In Causing Autism

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 5:51 pm

The hunt to find genes that cause autism has been a long slog, one hampered by a lack of technology and families willing to be tested.

But the effort is starting to pay off. On Tuesday, researchers at more than 50 laboratories said they had identified more than 100 genes that are mutated in children with autism, dozens more than were known before.

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Goats and Soda
11:51 am
Tue October 28, 2014

Happy Birthday To Google Doodle Honoree Dr. Jonas Salk!

Jonas Salk was born on October 28, 1914 in New York City. Google is celebrating the birth of the man who developed a polio vaccine with a special Google doodle.

During the fervor of the current Ebola outbreak, it seems like a good moment to tip our hats to one of the heroes of an earlier epidemic. Salk developed a vaccine for polio in 1953. At a time polio was sweeping across the United States crippling children and terrifying parents.

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Shots - Health News
3:27 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

Ancient Viruses Lurk In Frozen Caribou Poo

Caribous doing their business in mountain ice have left a viral record hundreds of years old.
Courtesy of Brian Moorman

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 7:58 am

A careful examination of frozen caribou poop has turned up two never-before-seen viruses.

The viruses are hundreds of years old: One of them probably infected plants the caribous ate. The other may have infected insects that buzzed around the animals.

The findings prove viruses can survive for surprisingly long periods of time in a cold environment, according to Eric Delwart, a researcher at Blood Systems Research Institute in San Francisco.

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Goats and Soda
3:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Surrogacy Storm In Thailand: A Rejected Baby, A Busy Babymaker

Thai surrogate mother Pattaramon Chanbua with her baby Gammy, who was born with Down Syndrome. An Australian couple who'd arranged for Pattaramon to serve as their surrogate rejected the child.
Nicolas Asfouri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 5:28 pm

Baby Gammy might mean the end of Thailand's lucrative surrogacy business.

He's the child who was carried by a surrogate mom in Thailand-- and rejected by the Australian couple who had agreed to pay the mother $12,000. The reason: Prenatal testing showed that the baby, a twin, had Down syndrome.

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Goats and Soda
11:08 am
Fri October 17, 2014

3-Year-Old Ebola Survivor Proposes To Nurse

After beating Ebola, young Ibrahim celebrated by proposing to his nurse.
Anders Kelto NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 5:28 pm

Isata Kallon, a nurse at Kenema Hospital in eastern Sierra Leone, remembers the day 3-year-old Ibrahim showed up at the Ebola treatment center. He was with his mother and two older brothers, ages 5 and 8. They all had Ebola. Ibrahim was especially sick, vomiting constantly.

"The chance of survival was very low for him," says Kallon, who's in her 30s. She sits at a picnic table outside the Ebola ward, her hair pulled back with a hairband and her blue nursing scrubs tinged with sweat around the neck.

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Let's Talk Kids
12:48 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Let's Talk Kids - "The Cost of Worry"

Credit mattpenning.com 2010 / WUIS/Illinois Issues

Worry represents our deep investment in our offspring whose health and happiness mean the world to us.  But there’s a steep cost to worry if it robs us of our enjoyment of our children.  A worried parent may be so consumed with fear that she’s unavailable to be present with her kids. 

A worried mom can’t celebrate her son’s learning to walk for fear that he’ll fall.  A worried dad feels sick at his daughter’s graduation, agonizing about her leaving for college.  Each development calls up a whole new set of troubles to anticipate.

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All Tech Considered
12:57 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

'Why Kids Sext' Describes Nude Photos As 'Social Currency' Among Teens

"The sexts are currency," explains Hanna Rosin. Teenage girls told Rosin boys collect the photos like "baseball cards or Pokemon cards."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 5:55 pm

In April, residents of Louisa County, Va., were shocked to learn of a sexting "ring" among the town's teenagers. When Hanna Rosin asked teens from Louisa County High School how many people they knew who had sexted, a lot of them replied: "Everyone." But what was originally characterized in the media as an organized criminal affair was soon revealed to be widespread teen behavior.

"I think we as a culture don't know whether to be utterly alarmed by sexting, or think of it as a normal part of teenage sexual experimentation," Rosin tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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U.S.
2:40 am
Wed October 15, 2014

'Culture Of Violence' Pervades Rikers' Juvenile Facilities

An inmate at Rikers Island juvenile detention facility carries a plastic fork behind his back as he walks with other inmates. A recent report found that juvenile detainees are subjected to routine violence, both by other inmates and by correction officers.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 3:19 pm

For most of New York, Rikers Island is out of sight and out of mind. It's in the middle of the East River between Queens and the Bronx. There's only one unmarked bridge that leads on and off. But a recent report on violence by correction officers, or COs, was no surprise to those who've spent time there.

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Shots - Health News
9:03 am
Mon October 13, 2014

A Polar Bear Might Keep The Measles Away, But Shots Work Better

A scene from the Ivy and Bean poster on vaccinating against measles.
Sophie Blackall

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 3:32 pm

In the bestselling Ivy and Bean books, 7-year-old Bean puts a lot of energy into avoiding chores and reading. So when her friend Ivy brings up measles shots, Bean is ready with alternatives:

  • Wear a hazmat suit for the rest of your life.
  • Make an anti-measles force field with 24 hula hoops.
  • Cover yourself in a 6-inch protective layer of lard.
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Goats and Soda
6:03 am
Sat October 11, 2014

Nobel Laureate Kailash Satyarthi Aims To Eliminate Child Labor

Nobel Laureate Kailash Satyarthi has fought to end child labor in India, where 11 percent of the country's children work. In 2010, these children toiled at a construction site in New Delhi.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 10:22 pm

There are 165 million children toiling as child laborers around the globe, a number that Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi has dedicated his life to reducing. His organization, Bachpan Bachao Andolan, or Save the Childhood, works to free children in India from forced servitude and enroll them in school. The 60-year-old father of two has spent decades campaigning to end child labor and human trafficking in India.

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Goats and Soda
5:15 am
Sat October 11, 2014

Photographers Capture The Sorrow And Pain Of Global Girls

This year, Lynsey Addario photographed 13-year-old Rahaf Yousef, a Syrian refugee, at her engagement party at a camp in Jordan. "Syrian refugees typically marry young," says Addario. "It's been exacerbated by the war. Families are scared something might happen to their daughter. They prefer to marry them earlier so they're under the protection of a husband."
Lynsey Addario/Reportage by Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 9:28 am

Today is the International Day of the Girl Child. It is a U.N. event with a grand name and a powerful mission. Girls around the world, especially in lower-income countries, often face terrible things, from genital mutilation to child marriage to kidnapping. We asked five photographers, who devote much or all of their time to documenting the lives of global girls, to share photos with special significance and talk about the images.

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Goats and Soda
3:59 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

A Day For Global Girls Gets People Talking, But Then What?

High School students participate in a rally for the International Day of the Girl Child in Ahmedabad, India.
Sam Panthaky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 4:14 pm

Tomorrow marks the third International Day of the Girl Child, designated by the U.N. to highlight the need to create a better world for adolescent girls.

It's a day when activists ramp up efforts to make the public aware of issues like child marriage, violence against girls and the lack of access to education. It's also a time for activists to push world leaders to make commitments — financial or policy-wise — to end those problems.

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Shots - Health News
1:08 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Sloppy Splinting Can Make A Child's Broken Arm Much Worse

A helmet and pads won't prevent every fracture — but they help.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 5:17 pm

About half of all boys and a quarter of all girls will break an arm or leg before they turn 16, statistics suggest — in many skateboarding, ballplaying families, a fracture is almost expected as the price of a fun, adventurous life. And, assuming the bones are set the right way, most such breaks quickly heal without lasting damage.

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Let's Talk Kids
6:45 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Let's Talk Kids - "Design for Success"

Credit mattpenning.com 2010 / WUIS/Illinois Issues

I’ve noticed something about my alarm clock:  If I set it for 4 a.m., it goes off at 4 a.m. every time.  It doesn’t sometimes sound at 4 and other times at 9.  It always goes off at 4.

It was designed to respond the way I’ve instructed it to when I set it.  For me to expect it to function any other way would be silly.  And yet sometimes, we expect people to function differently than they were programmed to function.  Here’s an example.

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Shots - Health News
11:33 am
Thu October 9, 2014

4 Things We've Learned About Enterovirus D68, And 1 Mystery

Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., was the first to report a surge of children with serious respiratory illness in August.
Andy Pollard Children's Mercy Kansas City

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 7:15 am

On Aug. 15, doctors and nurses at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., realized they had a problem.

Children were coming into the emergency room with an illness that caused wheezing and breathing problems so severe that some children ended up in the ICU on ventilators. And it was spreading fast.

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Shots - Health News
4:59 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Detergent Pods Can Cause Eye Injuries In Children

If you think this looks like something fun to play with, you could get yourself into trouble.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 4:33 pm

Liquid detergent pods can cause eye injuries in children after they squeeze or bite the brightly colored pouches, a study finds.

Eye doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical treated 10 young children who had eye injuries in 2012 and 2013 as a result of encounters with a ruptured detergent pod. The injuries included conjunctivitis and corneal damage; fortunately they all recovered within a week, with no long-range problems.

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All Tech Considered
4:44 pm
Mon October 6, 2014

Even Techies Limit Their Children's Screen Time

A recent UCLA study found that screen time could negatively affect children's ability to read emotion. But scientists are still unsure how much screen time is too much for a child.
Anatoliy Babiy iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 6:54 pm

Sure, using tablets and computers can have upsides for children. They can provide, education for one, or just plain old entertainment value.

But we know there are downsides, too. NPR reported just last week on a study indicating screen time can negatively affect children's ability to read people's emotions.

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Goats and Soda
5:17 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

After Losing Parents To Ebola, Orphans Face Stigma

A girl cries outside an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia in late September. Both her parents died in the Ebola outbreak.
Zoom Dosso AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 5:41 pm

In the countries of West Africa where Ebola is taking its heaviest toll, one special concern is for the thousands of children whose parents have died from the illness.

According to UNICEF, at least 3,700 children in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone have lost one or both parents to Ebola since the outbreak's start.

The figures are climbing, says Andrew Brooks, UNICEF's head of child protection for West and Central Africa. In Liberia alone, where he's currently based, Ebola has robbed about 2,000 children of their parents.

One particular case struck him.

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Shots - Health News
1:31 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

Is Enterovirus D68 Behind The Mysterious Paralysis In Children?

Sofia Jarvis, seen here with her family at a press conference in February, is one of several dozen children in California who have been diagnosed with a rare paralytic syndrome. It has left her left arm paralyzed.
Martha Mendoza AP

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 3:28 pm

When nine children in one hospital in Colorado come down with a mysterious form of paralysis in less than two months, it's hard not to worry.

Colorado has been hit hard by enterovirus D68, a virus that has caused severe respiratory illnesses in children around the country over the past few months.

All of the children had had been ill within a few weeks of suffering weakness in their arms or legs, a drooping face or difficulty swallowing.

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Shots - Health News
4:08 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Long-Term Birth Control Works Best For Teens, Pediatricians Say

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 10:46 am

"Always remember to use protection" is a fairly straightforward message for sexually active teens. But young women have a lot of options when it comes to the types of protection they can choose to use.

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