Harvest Desk

The Salt
11:23 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Mojito Diplomacy: Chefs Plan Culinary Tours To Cuba

A vendor reaches out to catch a pineapple at a food market in the outskirts of Havana.
Ramon Espinosa AP

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 2:11 pm

Miami Chef Douglas Rodriguez is known as the "Godfather of Nuevo Latino Cuisine" for the pan-Latin American style of cooking he helped pioneer. But, as the son of Cuban immigrants, his early cooking education was firmly rooted in the traditions of his parents' homeland.

Read more
Fitness & Nutrition
6:51 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Trying To Lose Weight? Your Environment, Mindset May Need Work First

Sure, these Buffalo-chicken-and-kale-stuffed mushrooms look tasty, but they aren't the giant bowl of salt and corn syrup your brain really, really wants.
Matthew Mead AP

This January, either you or someone you know is probably trying to lose some weight. Either you or that person probably will fail. In fact, only 77 percent of people maintain their resolutions for a single week, and only 19 percent last two years (some claim the success rate might be as low as 8 percent).

Read more
The Salt
2:22 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Tweaks To Cadbury Creme Eggs Not Going Over Easy In The U.K.

A box of five Cadbury Creme Eggs in London. The confectioner's decision to change the chocolate used to make the outer shell has left many in the U.K. in "shellshock."
Anthony Devlin PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 12:03 am

Easter is still far away, but in the United Kingdom, the weeks after Christmas are when stores begin stocking Cadbury's iconic Creme Eggs — those foil-wrapped chocolates filled with gooey "whites" and "yolks" made of candy.

For many people there, the eggs aren't just sweets — they're "edible time capsules that take consumers back to their childhood with every mouthful," as the U.K.'s Telegraph put it.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:34 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

After Foie Gras Ban Lifted In California, Some Chefs Face Threats

Karlene Bley of Los Angeles spreads her torchon of foie gras onto bread during lunch at the Presidio Social Club restaurant in San Francisco. Last week, a federal judge overturned California's ban on the dish.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 11:59 am

Last Wednesday, a federal judge overturned California's ban on the sale of foie gras, the delicacy made from the livers of fatty ducks and geese that have often been force-fed. The ban was approved by California voters in 2004, and went into effect in 2012.

Since the ban was overturned, some chefs using foie gras in their menus have been receiving threats.

Read more
The Salt
5:34 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

We Lie About What We Eat, And It's Messing Up Science

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 12:18 pm

How many peanuts did you snack on last week? If you don't remember, you're not alone. We humans are notoriously bad at remembering exactly what and how much we ate. And if there's one pattern to our errors, it's that we underestimate — unintentionally and otherwise.

And yet, for decades, researchers who want to amass large quantities of data about how much Americans eat and exercise have had to rely on individuals to self-report this information.

Read more
The Salt
2:58 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

Philadelphia Pizza Lovers Pay It Forward One Slice At A Time

Slices of pizza on the counter of Rosa's Fresh Pizza, where customers are encouraged to pay it forward.
Elizabeth Fiedler/WHYY

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 2:11 pm

Some pizza restaurants decorate the walls with signed photos of minor local celebrities who once stopped by for a slice.

At Rosa's Fresh Pizza in Philadelphia, the shop is adorned with Post-it notes and letters. The messages are from customers who gave $1 so homeless members in the community could get a slice, which costs $1.

"The homeless, they come in and say, 'I hear you give out free pizza to homeless people,' " owner Mason Wartman tells The Salt.

Read more
The Salt
8:24 am
Wed January 14, 2015

Gluten-Free Craze Is Boon And Bane For Those With Celiac Disease

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 11:28 am

Gluten is the dietary boogeyman du jour.

And for people with celiac disease, a serious autoimmune disorder, gluten — a protein found in wheat, rye and barley — really is the boogeyman, triggering painful gastrointestinal inflammation and other symptoms. For these people, the phenomenal popularity of gluten-free diets has been both a blessing and a curse.

Read more
The Salt
3:30 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

GMO Potatoes Have Arrived. But Will Anyone Buy Them?

After a turn in the tumbling machine, these conventional russet Burbank potatoes are starting to show signs of bruising. New GMO potatoes called Innate russet Burbanks have been bred not to bruise as easily as these.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 6:30 pm

On the face of it, the new potato varieties called "Innate" seem attractive. If you peel the brown skin off their white flesh, you won't find many unsightly black spots. And when you fry them, you'll probably get a much smaller dose of a potentially harmful chemical.

But here's the catch: Some of the biggest potato buyers in the country, such as Frito-Lay and McDonald's, seem afraid to touch these potatoes. Others don't even want to talk about them because they are genetically modified organisms, or GMOs.

Read more
The Salt
1:27 pm
Tue January 13, 2015

How Do We Grow To Like The Foods We Once Hated?

Jasjit Kaur Singh, an Indian chef, cooks kaala channa, a traditional spicy Sikh dish. A psychologist says that children who grow up in cultures with lots of spicy food are taught to like spice early on.
Richard Lautens Toronto Star via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 1:43 pm

Why do some of us like to slather hot sauce or sprinkle chili powder onto our food, while others can't stand burning sensations in our mouth?

It probably has to do with how much we've been socially pressured or taught to eat chili, according to Paul Rozin, a cultural psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania who has studied attitudes toward food for decades.

Read more
The Salt
4:54 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

Minifasting: How Occasionally Skipping Meals May Boost Health

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 4:20 pm

If you've ever gone to sleep hungry and then dreamed of chocolate croissants, the idea of fasting may seem completely unappealing.

But what if the payoff for a 16-hour fast — which might involve skipping dinner, save a bowl of broth — is a boost in energy and a decreased appetite?

Read more
The Salt
1:56 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

Sandwich Monday: The White Castle Veggie Slider

Let's talk about the creepy green stains on the slider sleeves.
NPR

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 9:13 am

White Castle is not a place you think of as a restaurant for vegetarians. In fact, early franchises built moats and had cauldrons of hot oil at the ready to keep vegetarians out. So, the new Veggie Slider comes as something of a surprise. It's a tiny veggie burger made with carrots, zucchini, peas, spinach and broccoli on a tiny bun, topped with honey mustard, ranch or Thai sauce.

Eva: Oh, did you get these from Beige With Weird Green Lumps Castle?

Miles: Harold and Kumar Go To White Castle, Are Confused.

Read more
The Salt
11:14 am
Mon January 12, 2015

What Might Be Missing From MyPlate? Water

The University of California's Nutrition Policy Institute has proposed that MyPlate include an icon for water.
UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Sometime in the next few weeks, we'll be hearing from the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. The panel of nutrition experts is tasked with reviewing the latest science on nutrition and medicine and making recommendations on how to update the next version of the federal government's guidance on eating.

Read more
The Salt
2:26 am
Mon January 12, 2015

Iowa's Largest City Sues Over Farm Fertilizer Runoff In Rivers

The city of Des Moines, Iowa, sits on the Raccoon and Des Moines rivers. The city's water works says it will sue three neighboring counties for high nitrate levels in these waterways.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 6:09 pm

Des Moines, Iowa, is confronting the farms that surround it over pollution in two rivers that supply the city with drinking water. Des Moines Water Works says it will sue three neighboring counties for high nitrate levels in the Raccoon and Des Moines rivers. It's a novel attempt to control fertilizer runoff from farms, which has been largely unregulated.

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:48 pm
Sun January 11, 2015

If A Smart Stove Could Suggest Recipes, Would You Buy It?

Whirlpool's Kitchen of the Future is on display at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The concept includes a cooktop and connected backsplash that offers recipes and other information.
Whirlpool

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 2:12 pm

Imagine this: You just got home from work and, instead of doing the usual kale salad and lean steak for dinner, you grab a bag of chips and lie down in bed.

The sensors — in your cabinets, in your room, on your wrist — can tell that you're not yourself. The data across devices can talk to each other and infer: You're sad. And so, out pops an alert to recommend a movie to lift your mood. Or a latte at just the right strength.

Read more
The Salt
5:02 am
Sun January 11, 2015

'Tasty': How Flavor Helped Make Us Human

"Flavor is the most important ingredient at the core of what we are. It created us," John McQuaid writes in his book Tasty: The Art and Science of What We Eat.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 11, 2015 1:57 pm

Our current cultural obsession with food is undeniable. But, while the advent of the foodie may be a 21st century phenomenon, from an evolutionary standpoint, flavor has long helped define who we are as a species, a new book argues.

In Tasty: the Art and Science of What We Eat, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist John McQuaid offers a broad and deep exploration of the human relationship to flavor.

"Flavor is the most important ingredient at the core of what we are. It created us," McQuaid writes.

Read more
Food
4:19 pm
Sat January 10, 2015

In California, Foie Gras Is Back On The Menu

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 1:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
The Salt
3:35 pm
Sat January 10, 2015

Sugar, Salt And Subtle Tannins: Pairing Wine And Junk Food

"Lovely bouquet ... it will go perfectly with my Tootsie Rolls."
Getty Images/Flickr RM/Ozy.com

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 12:30 pm

The classic rules for wine pairing work well for a nice night out: white wine with fish; red wine with steak. But what about nights you stay in — with a bag of candy, or chips, or takeout?

Read more
The Salt
2:09 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Is 'Cook At Home' Always Good Health Advice?

One reason cooking at home might be linked to poor health? Researchers say it could be because there are too many unhealthful baked goods coming out of the oven.
Amriphoto iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri January 9, 2015 3:48 pm

Author Michael Pollan called home cooking the "single most important thing we could do as a family to improve our health and general well-being" in his 2013 book Cooked.

Read more
The Salt
12:31 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Vintage Beer? Aficionados Say Some Brews Taste Better With Age

A stash of vintage beers at Dogfish Head Brewery in Delaware.
Courtesy of Dogfish Head Craft Brewery

Originally published on Fri January 9, 2015 1:39 pm

In the late 1970s, a young Southern California beer enthusiast named Bill Sysak began doing something quite novel at the time. He bought cases of beer and stashed the bottles in his basement to age like wine. Over several years, Sysak discovered that some beers could develop rich flavors — like toffee and caramel — not present in their youth. Excited by what he found, Sysak ramped up his cellaring program and made it a full-time hobby.

Read more
TED Radio Hour
8:02 am
Fri January 9, 2015

Can Organic Farming Make Perfect Fish?

Chef Dan Barber explains how he went on a journey to find the perfect fish.
James Duncan Davidson Courtesy of TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode In Search Of

About Dan Barber's TED Talk

Chef Dan Barber tackles a dilemma facing many chefs today: how to keep fish on the menu. He chronicles his search for a fish that would please both diners and environmentalists.

About Dan Barber

Read more
The Salt
4:40 pm
Thu January 8, 2015

On His 80th Birthday, Shake It Like Elvis With A Milkshake

A still-trim Elvis Presley enjoys a sandwich in 1958. His love of fatty foods hadn't caught up to him yet.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 5:29 pm

Elvis Presley was better known for his music than his gourmet tastes. But he did have a famous affinity for the fried goodness of the American South — and he had the waistline to prove it.

In honor of what would have been the King of Rock 'n' Roll's 80th birthday, let's take a look at some of his legendary eating habits.

Read more
The Salt
3:56 pm
Thu January 8, 2015

Out Of the Shadows And Onto Menus: Foie Gras Is Back In California

A foie gras dish is prepared at Hot's Kitchen during a "Farewell Fois Gras" event in June 2012 in Hermosa Beach, Calif. The restaurant was one of three plaintiffs that filed suit after the ban went into effect, and it has been serving free foie gras to guests ever since.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 4:07 pm

Foie gras, the luxe delicacy made from fatty duck or goose livers, is no longer contraband on California menus.

A federal judge on Wednesday lifted a statewide ban on the sale of foie gras, which is made from the engorged liver of ducks or geese that have been force-fed to create the food's signature rich, creamy taste.

Read more
The Salt
9:49 am
Thu January 8, 2015

How Food Shopping Can Turn New Year's Resolutions Into 'Res-Illusions'

Researchers created the bag on the left as an example of groceries bought in December while those on the right show groceries bought in January. After the New Year, some shoppers add healthier items to their carts but end up taking home more calories than they do during the holidays, a study found.
Robyn Wishna Cornell University

It's the time of year when many of us have promised to drink less, eat less and eat better. But a new study shows that in the first few months of the New Year, families may be piling more food into the shopping cart than they do the rest of the year.

Read more
The Salt
5:27 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

Bite Back At Bad Cholesterol: Eat An Avocado A Day

Researchers say they think there's something in the avocado — other than just the healthy fat — that may lower bad cholesterol.
Tastyart Ltd Rob White Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 4:11 pm

New research finds that eating an avocado per day, as part of an overall diet rich in healthy fats, may help cut the bad kind cholesterol, known as LDL.

Researchers at Pennsylvania State University recruited 45 overweight participants who agreed to try three different types of cholesterol-lowering diets. Their study was published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Read more
The Salt
11:07 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Why Some Chefs Just Can't Quit Serving Bluefin Tuna

The IUCN says the Atlantic bluefin tuna is endangered. Its stocks have declined globally between 29 percent and 51 percent over the past 21 to 39 years, according to the conservation group.
Tono Balaguer iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 1:28 pm

On Monday, a single 380-pound bluefin tuna sold for about $37,500 in the first auction of the year at the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo. That's far below the peak price of $1.76 million that a bluefin went for at the same market in 2013, and this year's price isn't a good indicator of the supply, or population status.

Read more
The Salt
3:19 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

From Paleo To Plant-Based, New Report Ranks Top Diets Of 2015

The Mediterranean-like DASH and the plant-centric Ornish eating plan topped this year's rankings of diets by a panel assembled by U.S. News & World Report.
Gillian Blease Getty Images/Ikon Images

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 7:11 am

Despite the buzz about paleo and raw food diets, a new ranking of the 35 top diets puts these two near the bottom of the list.

Why?

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:02 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Many Insurers Don't Cover Drugs For Weight Loss

Belviq, a weight-loss drug from Arena Pharmaceuticals, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2012. With the agency's approval of Saxenda in December, there are four new weight-loss pills available.
Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc/Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 7:07 am

In December, the Food and Drug Administration approved a new obesity drug, Saxenda, the fourth prescription medicine the agency has given the green light to fight obesity since 2012. But even though two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese, there's a good chance their insurer won't cover Saxenda or other anti-obesity drugs.

Read more
The Salt
11:15 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Going Dry: The Benefits Of A Month Without Booze

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 1:11 pm

As New Year's resolutions go, cutting back on food and drink are right at the top of the list. And while those vowing to change their eating habits may cut the carbohydrates or say a sweet goodbye to sugar, for regular drinkers, the tradition may involve what's known as a "dry January": giving up booze for a month.

But could such a short-term breakup with alcohol really impart any measurable health benefits?

Read more
The Salt
2:52 am
Tue January 6, 2015

How Anglers Are Learning To Save Fish That Get 'The Bends'

Barotrauma can cause a fish's eyes to pop out of its head and its stomach to be pushed out of its mouth, according to Chris Lowe, a marine scientist at California State, Long Beach.
Jon Hamilton NPR

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 10:35 am

Read more
All Tech Considered
4:17 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Self-Tracking Gadgets That Play Doctor Abound At CES

The San Francisco-based startup CellScope has built a tool to do ear exams at home, instead of going to the doctor.
Cellscope

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 12:30 pm

When your kid's ear is throbbing at 2 a.m., you might want to grab the car keys and head to the emergency room. But now you can pick up your iPhone instead.

A startup called CellScope has built a little ear probe that you clip on top of your iPhone camera. The footage streams into an app where you can view the inside the ear.

Read more

Pages