Harvest Desk

The Salt
2:38 am
Tue September 30, 2014

European Activists Say They Don't Want Any U.S. 'Chlorine Chicken'

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 12:46 pm

Mute Schimpf doesn't want to eat American chicken. That's because most U.S. poultry is chilled in antimicrobial baths that can include chlorine to keep salmonella and other bacteria in check. In Europe, chlorine treatment was banned in the 1990s out of fear that it could cause cancer.

"In Europe there is definitely a disgust about chlorinated chicken," says Schimpf, a food activist with Friends of the Earth Europe, an environmental group.

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Food
3:14 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

The End Of Summer Means The End Of 'Snowballs' In New Orleans

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 5:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Salt
2:05 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Pizza Cake

And this is what we got.
NPR

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 10:10 am

I generally don't like cake, because it is too sweet, too bland in texture, and doesn't have enough pork products. So I was excited to see this recipe pop up on Buzzfeed. (UPDATE 10/21/2014: For those keeping score, it looks like So Good Blog rolled out this pizza cake recipe months earlier than Buzzfeed.)

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Shots - Health News
1:12 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

More Active Play Equals Better Thinking Skills For Kids

Good for bodies and good for brains, the scientists say.
iStockphoto

As schools cut down on physical education and recess, kids are spending more time than ever in a desk. And while nerdy second-graders like me didn't ever consider arguing for more gym, there's increasing evidence that being active helps not just children's waistlines but their brains.

"If you consider the anthropology of humankind, we were designed to move," Charles Hillman, a professor of kinesiology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign tells Shots.

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The Salt
11:27 am
Mon September 29, 2014

Everything But The Squeal: How The Hog Industry Cuts Food Waste

The rendering industry likes to call itself the world's oldest recycling system. Nearly 100 percent of processed pigs will eventually get used — as meat and in uses as varied as medicine and pet food.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 9:34 am

A tour of a pork processing plant takes a hard hat, waterproof boots and a strong stomach.

Oh, and hairnets.

Americans eat just half of the meat produced by farm animals. So what happens to the rest of the animal? I arrive at the Farmland Food plant in Milan, a factory in northeast Missouri, for a tour.

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Harvest Desk
6:03 am
Mon September 29, 2014

Waste Weighing Down U.S. Food System

About 35 million tons of food was dumped in landfills across the U.S. in 2012, compared to 29 million tons of plastic and 24 million tons of paper. (Pat Aylward/NET News)

It’s a hot summer day outside of Lincoln, Neb., and Jack Chappelle is knee-deep in trash. He’s wading in to rotting vegetables, half-eaten burgers and tater tots. Lots of tater tots.

“You can get a lot of tater tots out of schools,” Chappelle says. “It doesn’t matter if it’s elementary, middle school or high school. Tater tots. Bar none.”

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The Salt
6:03 am
Sat September 27, 2014

Culinary Diplomacy Takes Texan Chef To The Land Of Grilled Yak

As you may have heard, America's diplomats are struggling these days with a few distracting and unpleasant events in far-off parts of the world. But they're rising to the challenge: They're sending in the chefs.

The U.S. State Department launched a Diplomatic Culinary Partnership two years ago in order to "elevate the role of culinary engagement in America's formal and public diplomacy efforts." Some of the country's most renowned chefs have volunteered to help out, joining the department's "Chef Corps."

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The Salt
5:15 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

GMO Wheat Investigation Closed, But Another One Opens

How did that genetically modified wheat end up in a field in Oregon? Investigators still don't know, but now they've found GMO wheat in Montana, too.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 6:38 pm

Investigators from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) say that they cannot figure out how genetically engineered wheat appeared, as if by magic, in a farmer's field in eastern Oregon in the spring of 2013.

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The Salt
9:32 am
Fri September 26, 2014

Belgium Likes Underground Beer. No, Literally

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 2:52 pm

The De Halve Maan Brewery prides itself on its family origins, its classic recipe, and the history of its beer, crafted carefully since 1856. But there's change brewing (pun intended) on the horizon: In 2015, its owners hope to open a pipeline of beer beneath the city streets of Bruges.

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The Salt
10:32 am
Thu September 25, 2014

A Bumpy Ride: Airplane Food Through The Decades

The good old days: A flight attendant serves coffee and sandwiches to a passenger on board an American Airlines flight, circa 1935.
Frederic Lewis Archive Photos/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 2:12 pm

People who fly coach on domestic carriers these days don't expect much from the in-flight service beyond watery soda and maybe a salty snack. Or if they're in the air for a few hours, they might get the option to buy a "meal" that looks like a cross between hospital food and school lunch. But that's not how it used to be.

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The Salt
2:33 am
Thu September 25, 2014

Sayonara To 'Super-Size Me'? Food Companies Cut Calories, So Do We

Wouldn't this salad make a healthful addition to your pizza for dinner?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 7:48 am

It just might be the dawn of a new era in American eating. Two-thirds of us are now more likely to go for foods marketed as lower-calorie and "better for you," and that means we're finally eating fewer calories.

But all this calorie-cutting from our cookies and cupcakes isn't just benevolent behavior on the part of the big food and beverage companies. It's also good for their bottom line.

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The Salt
6:05 pm
Wed September 24, 2014

To Stop Picky Eaters From Tossing The Broccoli, Give Them Choices

Students are given healthy choices on a lunch line at Draper Middle School in Rotterdam, N.Y., in 2012. To keep students from tossing out the fruits and vegetables they're served, researchers say it helps to give them a choice in what they put on their trays.
Hans Pennink AP

Originally published on Thu September 25, 2014 4:11 pm

In many communities, the local school district is the largest food provider, filling thousands of hungry bellies every day. But trying to feed healthful food to some of the pickiest eaters can result in mountains of wasted food.

Now, many schools are finding that giving kids a say in what they eat can cut down on what ends up in the trash.

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The Salt
2:05 pm
Wed September 24, 2014

The Gefilte Fish Line: A Sweet And Salty History Of Jewish Identity

Sweet or salty? Historically among Eastern European Jews, how they liked their gefilte fish depended on where they lived. This divide created a strictly Jewish geography known as "the gefilte fish line."
Claire Eggers NPR

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 12:41 pm

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a day when everything tastes like dessert. In symbolic hope of a sweet year to come, the table is positively sticky — honey marinades, honey cakes, raisin-studded challah bread. And, depending on where your family is from, sweet gefilte fish.

Gefilte fish, those oft-reviled patties packed in jelled broth, can be a hard sell even in the standard savory form. And with a big dose of sugar stirred in? It can be hard to swallow. But for Jews with roots in Poland, gefilte fish was always sweet. Always.

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The Salt
8:30 am
Wed September 24, 2014

Scientists Step Up Food Fraud Efforts Following Horse Meat Scandal

The French enjoy horse meat — here's a horse meat butcher in Paris. But even the French were angry that they had been paying beef prices for it last year.
Thomas Coex AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 24, 2014 10:35 am

Last year, the great European horse meat scandal alerted consumers around the world to food fraud.

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The Salt
2:46 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

Before You Take A Bite Of That Mushroom, Consider This

This grocery store packet of porcini mushrooms contained a surprise: three species of fungi never before named or described.
Bryn Dentinger/Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 5:03 pm

If you haven't been DNA-sequencing your dinner lately, you've been missing out. In particular, we suggest examining those spongy, wild fungi before you lay them on your pizza.

Bryn Dentinger and Laura Suz, mycologists with the Royal Botanic Gardens in Surrey, England, were curious about what was in their marketplace 'shrooms. So they bought a packet of dried Chinese porcini and took it to the lab.

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The Salt
11:54 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Rosh Hashana's Sacred Bread Offers Meaning In Many Shapes And Sizes

The author's braided round challah.
Deena Prichep NPR

Originally published on Thu September 25, 2014 9:36 am

Editor's Note: This post was originally published on Sept. 15, 2012.

Challah is a rich, eggy bread baked every week for the Jewish sabbath, or shabbat. But for Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year that starts tomorrow at sundown, it gets a few tweaks. There's a little extra honey or sugar, for a sweet new year. And instead of the usual long braid, it's round.

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Shots - Health News
11:39 am
Tue September 23, 2014

To Make Interval Training Less Painful, Add Tunes

This may be the most efficient way to get in shape, but it may also be the least fun.
Li Zhongfei iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed September 24, 2014 2:41 pm

There's increasing evidence that interval training, which involves alternating short bursts of harder exercise with easier recovery periods, delivers more health benefits than exercising at a steady rate.

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The Two-Way
11:29 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Stoutaccino? Starbucks Tests Coffee With Beer Flavors

In some parts of the U.S., Starbucks is testing a latte flavored with roasted-stout notes along with its seasonal autumn drinks such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte, seen here at front.
Starbucks

Originally published on Tue September 23, 2014 12:26 pm

Reports that Starbucks is testing a new coffee drink for autumn that incorporates "toasty stout flavors" has set off a debate over how such a concoction might taste — and questions over where customers can find one. The Dark Barrel Latte was "inspired by the rise of craft beers," the company says.

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The Salt
9:49 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Your Guide To Dining From The Dump

Bounty from the bin: Thaler says you can find plenty of tasty, edible produce that's tossed out. Plastic-wrapped produce tends to be a safe bet, he says.
Courtesy of Maximus Thaler

Originally published on Thu September 25, 2014 9:35 am

When you think of a dumpster diver, you might think of someone like this:

And while you wouldn't be totally wrong, you also wouldn't exactly be describing Maximus Thaler.

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Food
6:17 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Starbucks Tests Drink That Tastes Like Stout Beer

Originally published on Tue September 23, 2014 12:20 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Food
6:17 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Rearchers Find New Species Of Mushrooms

Originally published on Tue September 23, 2014 12:20 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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The Salt
4:11 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

Giving Chickens Bacteria ... To Keep Them Antibiotic-Free

Within a day after chicks hatch, they are sorted by sex and shipped to farms. Some will be treated with antibiotics; others will not.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Mon September 22, 2014 4:56 pm

You know those foods and pills that promise to supply your body with "good bacteria?"

They may or may not make you healthier, but some of these "probiotics" do, in fact, appear to be effective in chickens. Poultry companies are turning to probiotics as an alternative to antibiotics, which have become increasingly controversial.

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The Salt
2:48 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Abe Lincoln

The Abe Lincoln
NPR

Originally published on Mon September 22, 2014 3:46 pm

Fourscore and 700 calories ago, I took my first few bites of the Abe Lincoln Sandwich from Skrine Chops in Chicago. In a tribute to our 16th president, they've stacked up sausages like Lincoln Logs, set them atop a bed of mashed potatoes and doused them in barbecue sauce, all on a hamburger bun.

Ian: How is this sandwich not the first thing on Lincoln's Wikipedia page?

Kelsie: The ONLY way to play Lincoln Logs is with sausages.

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The Salt
1:59 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

Got Dessert? Slather On The Salted Caramel, Or Just Nibble Some

Salted caramel has arrived. Here it is at TGI Friday's, on cake, topped with a Ghirardelli salted caramel sauce.
Courtesy of TGI Friday's

Originally published on Tue September 23, 2014 8:27 am

The legendary American sweet tooth may be growing up. It's classier now; more sophisticated. It lusts after salt with its sweets.

Driven by an increasingly adventurous population of palates, now even mainstream retailers and restaurants are expanding their salty-sweet repertoire. Just 0.4 percent of U.S. restaurants offered salted caramel desserts on menus in 2010, according to food and beverage consultancy CCD Innovation. This year, 3.1 percent of them do.

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Food
6:36 am
Sat September 20, 2014

Syrup Induces Pumpkin-Spiced Fever Dreams

Originally published on Sat September 20, 2014 10:16 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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The Salt
6:03 am
Sat September 20, 2014

Beyond Charity: Turning The Soup Kitchen Upside Down

A cooking class at DC Central Kitchen on Aug. 29, 2013.
Courtesy of DC Central Kitchen

If you've ever volunteered in a soup kitchen, you know the feeling of having served others.

But what about those on the other side of the food line? Are they getting what they need most?

Robert Egger, the founder of DC Central Kitchen, didn't think so.

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Food
3:16 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Keeping Heirloom Apples Alive Is 'Like A Chain Letter' Over Many Centuries

Goodband compares these Knobbed Russets to shrunken heads. Others say potatoes or toads. They're all gnarled and warty and brown, but don't be intimidated: They taste great when ripe. They originated in Sussex, England, in 1819.
Melissa Block NPR

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 5:08 pm

It's apple season, and if you go to the supermarket you'll find the usual suspects: Red and Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, MacIntosh. But these big, shiny, perfect apples often look better than they taste. Thankfully, there's a whole world of heirloom apples out there — fruit that may look funky, but tastes fantastic, with flavors unlike any you've tried before.

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The Salt
2:58 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

To Foil Russia's Food Ban, Imported Ingredients Go Incognito

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 3:13 pm

It's been six weeks since Moscow slapped a ban on foods imported from the United States, the European Union and other countries that sanctioned Russia for its involvement in Ukraine. The implications of that move are just beginning to be felt.

Many of the Russian capital's trendiest restaurants have been hit hard because they get most of their ingredients from Europe. So they've had to scramble to find replacements.

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The Salt
11:41 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Women Can't Make Sushi, And Other Fishy Myths, Busted

One of the delicious tricks we picked up at sushi school: how to make this spicy salmon cucumber and crunchy shrimp roll.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 2:45 pm

The once rarefied taste of raw fish has now become an American staple.

Sushi is found at the humblest of supermarkets and on conveyor belt restaurants at the mall.

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The Salt
9:40 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Around The World In 8 Hospital Meals

Wow! This meal even looks like it's served on real china. Flickr user hewyk posted this image of a lunch from a Malaysian hospital.
hewyk/Flickr

Originally published on Thu September 25, 2014 12:32 pm

A hospital is probably the last place a foodie traveling abroad wants to grab a bite.

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