Harvest Desk

The Salt
4:23 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Eating Broccoli May Give Harmful Chemicals The Boot

Researchers say eating broccoli sprouts could help protect against the harmful effects of air pollution.
Julie Gibbons/Flickr

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 10:14 am

We get a little suspicious when we hear the claims that it's possible to get rid of the gunk that accumulates in our cells by doing a cleanse with "clean" foods.

But what if some foods actually do help detox the body?

Read more
The Salt
11:15 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Goats In The City? Making A Case For Detroit's Munching Mowers

Leonard Pollara, of Idyll Farms, with some of the goats housed in the Brightmoor neighborhood of Detroit.
Max Ortiz Courtesy of The Detroit News

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 4:14 pm

As more urban folk strive to produce their own food, gardens both large and small are popping up everywhere. And while it's not unheard of for city dwellers to keep bees and even chickens, only a brave few have been willing to try their hand at goats.

Like hedge fund manager Mark Spitznagel, who recently tried to revitalize Detroit's Brightmoor neighborhood with a herd of 18 baby goats.

Read more
All Tech Considered
8:54 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Turn Any Cup Into A Spillproof Sippy Cup For Your Kids

The stretchy silicone folds to be more compact.
Courtesy of Double Double

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 11:01 am

You're welcome, parents of young kids. The days of awkward-sized sippy cups taking up space in your cabinets, of cleaning up spills at restaurants and furiously matching lids to cups before rushing out the door may be over. SipSnap, this week's innovation pick, lets you turn any drinking vessel into a spillproof sippy cup for your little ones.

Read more
Food
4:08 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Uruguayan Soccer Team's Caramel Spread Denied Entry Into Brazil

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 6:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And let's stay with the World Cup in Brazil, where Uruguayan fans and media are crying foul - not on the soccer pitch, but involving Brazil's customs.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Customs officials confiscated more than 80 pounds of a favorite snack spread from Uruguay's soccer team, one of the World Cup favorites, when they entered the country last week. The spread, called dulce de leche, is like the Nutella of South America. You can spread it on bread; use it as ice cream topping.

Read more
The Salt
3:20 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

'Pink Slime' Is Making A Comeback. Do You Have A Beef With That?

South Dakota-based meat processor Beef Products Inc. shows a sample of its lean, finely textured beef in September 2012.
AP

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 3:36 pm

A much-maligned beef product that was once frequently added to hamburger is making a comeback. Two years ago, beef processors cut back sharply on producing what they call "lean, finely textured beef" after the nasty nickname for it, "pink slime," caught on in the media. Now, higher beef prices are leading to increased demand for the product.

To prepare, grocery stores and beef processors are getting ready for a new round of questions from consumers.

Read more
The Salt
2:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

In 'My Name Is Salt,' The Toil And Joy Of India's Salt Harvest

The work of harvesting salt, portrayed in the documentary My Name Is Salt, is difficult. But there's also a certain pride that comes with doing it well.
Leafbird Films

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 4:24 pm

The little white crystals are on every table at every meal, from fine dining restaurants to roadside diners to the family dinner table, ready to bring even the most hum-drum foods to life.

But you may never look at them the same way again after watching My Name Is Salt, a slow burn of a documentary that made its North American debut in mid June at the Los Angeles Film Festival.

Read more
The Salt
12:37 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Red Fish, Blue Fish: Where The Fish Flesh Rainbow Comes From

Yellowfin tuna; Chinook salmon; lingcod; Pacific halibut.
Chang/iStockphoto; Debbi Smirnoff/iStockphoto; via TeachAGirlToFish; Andrea Pokrzywinski/Flickr

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 3:36 pm

From red to white to orange to blue, fish flesh can land almost anywhere on the color spectrum.

What's behind this huge variation? A lot of things — from genetics to bile pigments. And parsing the rainbow can tell us something about where a fish came from, its swimming routine and what it ate.

Red yellowfin tuna: A classic of the sashimi counter, the yellowfin tuna is also the Michael Phelps of the fish world. And its athletic prowess has a lot to do with its ruby red flesh.

Read more
Shots - Health News
7:48 am
Tue June 17, 2014

Montana Mom's Ab Challenge Becomes A Phenomenon

Juan Darien iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 3:49 pm

Robyn Mendenhall Gardner was amazed when what started off as a monthlong ab workout challenge between friends and family caught fire on the Web.

The Montana mother of eight told Shots she came across a 30-day ab fitness plan online and, after having a tough time finishing it, turned it into a Facebook event to motivate herself.

Read more
The Salt
3:41 am
Tue June 17, 2014

In Yabbies And Cappuccino, A Culinary Lifeline For Aboriginal Youth

Australian celebrity chef and author Kylie Kwong (left) teaches a cooking workshop at Yaama Dhiyaan, a cooking and hospitality school for at-risk aborginal youth.
The Kitchen Sisters

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 4:48 pm

If you teach an aboriginal man (or woman) to make a cappuccino, can you feed his career for a lifetime?

That's the hope at Yaama Dhiyaan, a cooking and hospitality school for at-risk indigenous young people in Australia.

Students there are learning the skills to be cooks, restaurant and hotel workers, and caterers. The school is also helping to reconnect them to their culture, disrupted when many of their grandparents were kidnapped off the land, forced into missionary schools and denied the right to vote until the 1960s.

Read more
The Salt
4:29 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

In The Making Of Megafarms, A Mixture Of Pride And Pain

When families give up farming and move away, it drains life out of small communities.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 10:37 am

It seems that everybody, going back at least to Thomas Jefferson, loves small family farms.

Yet those beloved small farms are becoming increasingly irrelevant. Big farms are taking over.

According to the latest census of American agriculture, released this year, there are two million farms in America. But just four percent of those farms account for two-thirds of all agricultural production.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Finally! A Decent Espresso On The International Space Station

The new ISSpresso orbital espresso machine.
Argotec

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 10:31 am

Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano, during his stay on the International Space Station last year, said the one thing he missed was a real cup of espresso.

Engineers on the ground in Italy were way ahead of him.

They had already been hard at work solving the problems of zero-gravity espresso, and now they're ready to launch ISSpresso, "the first capsule-based espresso system able to work in the extreme conditions of space."

Read more
The Salt
2:37 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The B50 Burger

The B50 Burger — as in, you won't live to be 50.
NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 3:04 pm

Ever since Eli Whitney invented the Beef Gin in 1793, hamburgers have basically been the same: an all-beef patty, eaten as quickly as possible. But now, new technologies are allowing burgerologists to expand the medium. Chef's Burger Bistro in Chicago has created the B50 Burger, with a patty that's 50 percent ground beef, 50 percent ground bacon. And then there's a fried egg thrown on top, just for fun.

Read more
The Salt
2:51 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Hunting For Alien Bug And Seed Invaders At Baltimore's Port

David Ng (right) and Amanda Furrow, Customs and Border Protection agricultural specialists, inspect wheat for insects and alien seeds at a port in Baltimore, Md.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:33 am

Baltimore's seaport is a world of big, noisy steel machines: giant cargo ships, cranes and roaring trucks.

In the middle of this hubbub, David Ng, an agricultural specialist with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, tries to find things that are small and alive: snails, moths and weed seeds of all sorts.

Read more
Code Switch
2:43 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

A Mother's Beloved Cooking, A Daughter's Bittersweet Inheritance

Beenish Ahmed writes that her mother's roti is at the core of most of the family's meals.
Beenish Ahmed Beenish Ahmed For NPR

My mom cooks in a makeshift kitchen in the garage because she doesn't want the smell of simmering onions — the start of most of her dishes — to settle into the walls of our house. Even when there's a foot of snow on the ground, I find her there pulling jars of spices out of mismatched cabinets and stirring stews in a pan she brought from Pakistan when she couldn't find anything big enough to entertain with in the States.

Read more
Food
9:15 am
Sun June 15, 2014

The Milkman's Comeback Means Dairy At The Door And More

Driver Rick Galloway of South Mountain Creamery delivers milk in Liberty Town, Md., in 2004. Today the company has 8,500 home delivery accounts in five states.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 9:50 am

You don't even have to get out of your PJs to go to the farmers market now.

All over the country, trucks are now delivering fresh milk, organic vegetables and humanely raised chickens to your door — though in New York, the deliveries come by bike.

Fifty years ago, about 30 percent of milk still came from the milkman. By 2005, the last year for which USDA has numbers, only 0.4 percent was home delivered.

Read more
Food
6:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Ballpark Food: As American As Hotdogs With Bacon And Pesto

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 10:51 am

It's not just peanuts and Cracker Jacks anymore. As we head into summer, Dan Pashman of the Sporkful podcast tells NPR's Rachel Martin how to size up ballpark dining options from sushi to gelato.

The Salt
5:35 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

It's Pink, It's Fresh, It's Everywhere: Rosé Is Rising!

The intensity of the pink color of a rosé wine is determined by the length of time the grape juice has contact with the grape skin during the winemaking process. The wine on the left had the longest skin contact.
Sindhu Hirani Blume NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 8:05 am

The pink wine that got a bad rap for years has become synonymous with summer. Rosé is fashionable, complex and fresh. Even Brad and Angelina are in the rosé business. But why now?

Read more
The Salt
1:17 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

Holographic Chocolates Look As Beautiful As They Taste

A company called Morphotonix has given traditional Swiss chocolate-making a colorful twist: It's devised a method to imprint shiny holograms onto the sweet surfaces.
Courtesy of Morphotonix

For most of us, even one bite of chocolate is enough to send our taste buds into ecstasy. Now, scientists have concocted a process to make these dark, dulcet morsels look as decadent as they taste.

Switzerland-based company Morphotonix has given traditional Swiss chocolate-making a colorful twist: It's devised a method to imprint shiny holograms onto the sweet surfaces — sans harmful additives. Which means when you tilt the goodies from side to side, rainbow stars and swirly patterns on the chocolate's surface dance and shimmer in the light.

Read more
The Salt
2:13 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Salmonella Outbreak Linked To Chia Seed Powders, CDC Says

Salmonella has recently been found in ground chia seed powder, a superfood being put in everything from smoothies to cereal.
Marek Uliasz iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 3:25 pm

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating an ongoing salmonella outbreak linked to ...chicken? Nope, this time it's chia seed powder — which is made from tiny black and white chia seeds that are sprouted and ground.

Read more
The Salt
10:58 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Pakistani Juice Drink Packs A Sweet And Spicy Punch

A man drinks aloo pokhara, a heart-comforting prune juice in Islamabad.
Abdul Sattar NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 5:54 pm

You don't often see a man cheerily quaffing from a half-pint mug on a street corner in Pakistan's capital, Islamabad.

But the drink in this gentleman's hand is as innocent as a newborn kitten.

It's called aloo bukhara juice, and contains tamarind and dried plums, or prunes, if you prefer.

Summer's reaching a punishing peak here - it's 104 degrees Fahrenheit - so I assumed he was just drinking to keep cool.

Read more
The Salt
7:41 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Exercise And Protein May Help Good Gut Bacteria Get Their Groove On

Rugby and meat: a treat for the gut? A study suggests yes. Here Tony Woodcock (left) and Owen Franks of the All Blacks rugby team turn sausages on the barbecue in 2011 in Christchurch, New Zealand.
Phil Walter Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 9:46 am

Each month, it seems, we discover a new reason to appreciate the billions of bugs hanging out in our bellies. Why? They are far more influential than we ever thought.

As our colleague Rob Stein reported in his Guts and Glory series, the bacteria in our gastrointestinal tracts and on our skin may be doing everything from guiding the workings of our minds to helping us either fend off or become more predisposed to certain diseases.

Read more
The Salt
5:50 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

POM Wonderful Wins A Round In Food Fight With Coca-Cola

POM sued Coca-Cola, claiming that it was losing sales because the label and advertising for its Minute Maid pomegranate-blueberry drink were misleading consumers into believing they were getting a juice combination consisting mainly of pomegranate and blueberry juices when, in fact, the juice was more than 99 percent apple and grape juices, which are far cheaper.
Courtesy of the Coca-Cola Co.

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 11:47 am

A food fight at the U.S. Supreme Court ended in a unanimous decision on Thursday.

The justices ruled that POM Wonderful can go forward with a lawsuit alleging Coca-Cola Co. tricked consumers and stole business from POM with false and misleading juice labels.

The case centers on a product aimed at health-conscious consumers: pomegranate-blueberry juice.

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Head Injury Risk Rose In Cities After Bike-Sharing Rolled Out

John Rose NPR

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 11:20 am

Editors' Note: This post has been revised to clarify and correct reporting on the findings of the bike helmet study. The researchers looked at head injuries, not just brain injuries, so the descriptions have been changed to head injuries throughout. The lead researcher said in response to follow-up questions that the study was designed to look at the risk of head injuries as a proportion of all injuries related to bicycling, so the headline and descriptions of the work have been changed to reflect that distinction.

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:29 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Starbucks Makes Itself More Addictive With Wireless Phone Charging

Soon, you'll be able to recharge at Starbucks, and charge your device.
Courtesy of Duracell Powermat

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 10:11 am

Starbucks' latest innovation has nothing to do with coffee beans or breakfast, but it may lure the technologically dependent among us into its stores.

Read more
The Salt
2:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

A Sweet Solution For Dandelions: Eat 'Em To Beat 'Em

Freshly picked weeds, hot from the fryer.
Sarah Miles Flickr

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:42 am

When searching for ingredients to cook with, Irish chef Darina Allen sometimes has only to make a short trip — to her yard. There, she's sure to find a constellation of bright yellow dandelion flowers.

"Where other people see weeds, I see dinner!" she says.

Allen's the founder of the Ballymaloe Cookery School and an advocate of organic farming. She says that with a quick transplant from the yard to the kitchen, the humble dandelion might shed its bad rap.

Read more
The Salt
11:39 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Has The FDA Brought On A Cheese Apocalypse? Probably Not

The Food and Drug Administration official who recently suggested that the wooden boards used to age cheese for centuries may be unsafe probably did not expect to start a cheese storm. But she did.

In a letter to the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, FDA dairy safety chief Monica Metz wrote:

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:28 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Forget 10,000 Steps. For Happy Knees, 6,000 Will Do It

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:07 am

Exercise is the easiest way to avoid or reduce the pain of knee arthritis, but most adults aren't getting enough. Six thousand steps a day will do it, researchers say, which is considerably less than the 10,000 steps a day often touted by wellness programs.

Read more
The Salt
2:09 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Fight Over Calif. Oyster Company Splits Chefs And Land Defenders

The Drakes Bay Oyster Farm caters to local residents and restaurants. But unless its lease is renewed, its days are numbered.
Richard Gonzales NPR

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 3:38 pm

Drive just an hour and a half north of San Francisco, and you're in Drakes Estero, named for the first English explorer to lay claim to California.

This near-pristine, wind-whipped marine wilderness is a federally protected home for large beds of eelgrass, the base of the marine food chain. The estuary hosts the largest colony of harbor seals on the West Coast, and tens of thousands of resident and migratory birds.

It's also home to the Drakes Bay Oyster Co.

Read more
The Salt
3:42 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Can You Call Yourself An Environmentalist And Still Eat Meat?

There's little consensus in the debate on how meat consumption fits into environmentalism.
Jit Lim iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 3:28 pm

Earlier this week, we told you about a school backed by director James Cameron and his wife, Suzy Amis Cameron, that may become the first vegan school in the U.S.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:09 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy Gains Fans, But Remains Unproven

Maria Sharapova returns the ball during the semifinals of the French Open on June 5. She used platelet-rich plasma to treat a shoulder injury.
Miguel Medina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:12 pm

If you've Googled tennis elbow or plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendon pain you've almost certainly come across platelet-rich plasma, a treatment that uses a person's own blood to create an injection intended to speed healing.

You've also probably come across names like Kobe Bryant, Maria Sharapova, Rafael Nadal and Alex Rodriguez, pro athletes who supposedly have availed themselves of the treatment.

Read more

Pages