Harvest Desk

The Salt
12:04 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

I'm Not Just Gaming, Ma! I'm Helping The World's Farmers

Cropland Capture's developers hope players will find where crops are grown amid Earth's natural vegetation in satellite images to shine a light on where humanity grows its food.
Courtesy of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 2:05 pm

There's no easy way to track all of the world's crops. What's missing, among other things, is an accurate map showing where they are.

But the people behind Geo-Wiki are hoping to fix that, with a game called Cropland Capture. They're turning people like you and me into data gatherers, or citizen scientists, to help identify cropland.

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The Salt
4:40 am
Sat November 30, 2013

These Cookbook Photos Redefine What Fresh Seafood Looks Like

How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line.
Photos by Shimon and Tammar, Courtesy of Shimon and Tammar

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 10:05 am

How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line.

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Food
1:55 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Prune Logs? Try Pastilla, One Family's Sweet Tradition

Pastilla is made with honey, walnuts and shredded coconut and is served up in bite-sized logs.
Courtesy of Monday Morning Cooking Club

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 10:03 am

Hear the phrase "prune log" and most likely your first thought isn't "WOW! That sounds YUMMIDELICIOUS!"

But bear with us here at Found Recipes. We wouldn't even suggest you try pastilla if it wasn't good.

"It tastes like a not-too-sweet jam," says Merelyn Chalmers, one of the women behind the Monday Morning Cooking Club. They're a group of home cooks from Sydney, Australia, who collect and preserve recipes from the Jewish community there.

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The Salt
1:55 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Party Like It's 1799: Traditional Cider Makes A Comeback

Chuck Shelton in the cold room at Albemarle CiderWorks in Virginia, which makes sparkling alcoholic cider with some of the same apple varieties used by Thomas Jefferson.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 11:51 am

Feeling extra American this week? Wanna keep that post-turkey glow going? Well, how about a very American beverage: cider?

We're not talking about the hot mulled stuff that steams up your kitchen, or the sweet pub draft in a pint glass. This cider is more like sparkling wine.

"This is a phenomenally funky, sour, even mildly smoky cider that has to be tasted to be believed," says Greg Engert, one of the owners of a bar in Washington called ChurchKey. He's pouring cider from a tall champagne-style bottle that retails for around $15.

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The Protojournalist
5:29 pm
Thu November 28, 2013

Project Xpat: Thank You For Posting

Turkey of Thanksgiving in Kazakhstan.
Patricia Cullinane

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 10:36 am

Thanksgiving — like the universe — is expanding.

Traditionally a time for Americans to pause and give thanks to a Supreme Being — for health or harvest or happenstance, Thanksgiving is evolving before our very eyes into a holiday where we give thanks to each other as well.

Just this week we received Thanksgiving-themed thank-you notes from a doctor's office, a lawyers' association, a New Jersey congressman and others. Can Thanksgiving-themed gift cards be far behind?

It's not a bad idea. Saying thank you to more people.

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The Salt
10:31 am
Thu November 28, 2013

Why We Give Thanks For The Health Benefits Of Cranberries

Zac Visco for NPR

Originally published on Thu November 28, 2013 8:08 pm

Many of us sitting down for Thanksgiving feasts today have made cranberries a part of our holiday table. And from a health perspective, those bitter, bright red berries should be on your list of things to be thankful for.

As my colleague Allison Aubrey has previously reported, the Pilgrims believed that cranberries could cure scurvy. They were wrong on their reasoning but right on the cure: The berries are packed with vitamin C.

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The Salt
2:57 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Did Your Thanksgiving Turkey Take Any Antibiotics?

Turkeys sit in a barn in Sonoma, Calif. An estimated 46 million turkeys are cooked and eaten during Thanksgiving meals in the U.S.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 6:02 pm

In our series Pharmed Food, we've been looking closely at how the livestock industry in the U.S. uses antibiotics, and what that might mean for human health.

And so as Americans prepare to roast and baste plump, juicy holiday birds, we couldn't help but wonder what antibiotics the average turkey might have been given.

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The Salt
1:05 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Easy As Pie: Master The Art Of The Perfect Crust

To make a flaky pie crust, start by measuring out 12 ounces (by weight) flour, 8 ounces firm butter and 4 ounces ice water. Keeping it cool is key.
Phil Mansfield CIA

Originally published on Thu November 28, 2013 3:45 am

Those of us slaving over pecan and pumpkin pies ahead of Thanksgiving already know that pie-making season is decidedly in full swing. And on a segment for Morning Edition airing Thursday, host David Greene and I discuss the best advice for pie-making newbies. Really, it comes down to this:

Baking is not like cooking a stew or soup. Bakers can't take as many liberties — adding a pinch of this or that.

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The Salt
10:55 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Tell Us About Your Family's Endangered Dishes

iStock

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 6:13 pm

If you tuned in to Wednesday's Morning Edition, you may have heard NPR host/special correspondent Michele Norris' conversation with Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil of Sacramento, Calif., in the latest story from The Race Card Project.

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Shots - Health News
9:46 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Estrogen May Not Help Prevent Fuzzy Thinking After Menopause

Hormones clearly influence a women's health, but figuring out how is a tricky business.
Andrew Ostrovsky iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 10:16 am

There's a widely held belief that women experience moodiness and fuzzy thinking because of the drop in estrogen during menopause. And women have looked to hormone replacement therapy for relief.

But researchers increasingly think there's not much of a link between declining levels of estrogen during menopause and cognition.

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NPR Story
9:12 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Mashing Up Holiday Favorites For The 'Thanksgivukkah' Table

Sweet potato latkes
Courtesy Joan Nathan

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 6:21 pm

The second night of Hanukkah is converging with Turkey Day this year, forming a rare and delicious holiday that's being called "Thanksgivukkah."

As if cooking a 15- or 20-pound turkey isn't enough, many families will be trying to add traditional Hanukkah foods to the table. Joan Nathan, one of the country's foremost authorities on Jewish cooking, has some ideas on how to elegantly combine the two holidays: sweet potato latkes with celeriac root and apple (recipe below), ginger cookies decorated with menorahs and turkeys, and even kale salad with olive oil.

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Kitchen Window
7:26 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Even In Winter, Let Salads Reflect The Season

Laura B. Weiss for NPR

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 6:24 pm

When the days would grow shorter and the weather would turn wintry, I used to find myself despairing over the quality of salad fixings at my local market. Limp, tired lettuce. Pale tomatoes as hard as potatoes. Cucumbers with skins like buffalo hides. So I'd stop making salads altogether, until springtime rolled around and the first crop of tender young greens would show up at my local farmers market.

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Food
2:26 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Squash Your Thanksgiving With Tips From The Test Kitchen

Joe Keller Courtesy America's Test Kitchen

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 12:23 pm

Squash is the ultimate Thanksgiving food, not turkey. So says Chris Kimball, host of the PBS show America's Test Kitchen.

"Of all the things they served in that first Thanksgiving, there might not have been turkey," Kimball says. Early revelers may have dined on small birds or venison. "The one thing we know they did have was squash. So, if you want to go back to the first Thanksgiving, this is the item to start with."

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The Salt
2:23 am
Wed November 27, 2013

After Years Of Pasta, Rice Returns To A Filipino Family Kitchen

Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil with her grandmother, who taught her to make the Filipino dish lumpia, in 2009.
Courtesy of Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 10:40 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Harvest Desk
9:09 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Buffett: "Everybody Can Do Something" To Fight Hunger

Howard G. Buffett
Credit Peter Gray/WUIS

Farmer and philanthropist Howard G. Buffett had several messages for his hometown crowd this week. Among them?  "Everybody who is physically able" can do something to fight hunger.

Buffett spoke Tuesday before signing copies of his latest book, 40 Chances, at a fundraising event for Decatur area charities.  

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Recipes
3:51 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Susan Stamberg's Other Favorite Holiday Cranberry Dish

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 4:56 pm

NPR's Susan Stamberg has a booming laugh, a probing mind, and, of course, a cranberry relish recipe that's infamous in public radio land. But there's another dish that has graced her holiday table through the years — a dish that's been overshadowed by her mother-in-law's cranberry relish. It's Madhur Jaffrey's cranberry chutney.

Jaffrey is an actress who has become perhaps the world's best-known authority on Indian cooking, authoring more than 15 cookbooks.

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The Salt
3:09 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

In Vermont, A Wild-Game Church Supper Feeds The Multitudes

Adventurous carnivores from all over New England have been flocking to the Wild Game Supper in Bradford, Vt., for almost 60 years. The fare at this year's event included beaver, boar, moose and buffalo.
Herb Swanson for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 7:32 pm

The wild-game supper has traditionally been a way for rural America to share the harvest before winter sets in. Food historians trace the ritual back to Colonial times, when families had to hunt in order to eat well, and some providers were better shots than others.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Eating 'Wilder' Foods for a Healthier Diet

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Hope you had a good Thanksgiving, this being the day after. One of the best parts of Thanksgiving is, I think, the leftovers. Don't they always taste better? Well, my next guest is here to tell us how we can get the most flavor and nutrition out of those leftovers and our food all year round.

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The Salt
12:34 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Beer-Tapping Physics: Why A Hit To A Bottle Makes A Foam Volcano

Morgan Walker NPR

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 11:37 am

Ah, the old beer-tapping prank: One strong hit on the top of an open beer bottle, and poof! Your IPA explodes into a brewski volcano.

"In one second, most of your beer has really turned into foam," says physicist Javier Rodriguez Rodriguez of Carlos III University in Madrid. "You better have put the bottle into your mouth, because you need to drink whatever is coming out."

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Food
12:05 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Don't Stuff The Turkey And Other Tips From 'America's Test Kitchen'

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 4:24 pm

If there's one Thanksgiving mistake Jack Bishop sees more than any other, it's people rushing to carve their birds. Bishop is editorial director of the public TV series America's Test Kitchen. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "Turkey needs to rest before you carve it ... and a lot fewer juices will end up on the carving board."

Bishop and Bridget Lancaster, also of America's Test Kitchen, share their tips for buying, seasoning and cooking a turkey, and describe some of their favorite side dishes.

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The Salt
11:31 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Al Gore Goes Vegan, Following In Footsteps Of Bill Clinton

Former Vice President Al Gore has reportedly gone vegan.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:13 pm

The decision to give up entire food groups can be a radical attempt to reform an unhealthy diet, as former President Bill Clinton demonstrated when he revealed in 2011 that he'd gone vegan, after heart bypass surgery.

But more often in this day and age, eschewing animal products is political.

And so that's why we were interested to read that former Vice President Al Gore, one of the world's most famous environmentalists, had — like his former boss — gone vegan, too.

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NPR Story
10:54 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Pie Pops: Bite-sized 'Pocket Pies' On A Stick

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
7:26 am
Tue November 26, 2013

If You Must Fry A Turkey, Listen To William Shatner First

Don't try this at home: Actor William Shatner in State Farm's Eat, Fry, Love: A Cautionary Remix video about how to safely fry a turkey.
State Farm

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 10:06 am

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The Salt
2:08 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Oprah's 'Love Sandwich'

Peter wonders if starting P Magazine was such a good idea.
NPR

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 3:41 pm

Subscribers to Oprah's O magazine wait all year for the "Oprah's Favorite Things" issue, in which Oprah lists a bunch of things you need to buy if you want any chance of becoming Oprah. It's just out, and in it Oprah mentions that she makes for Stedman something she calls a "Love Sandwich." If you don't know who Stedman is, I'm not even going to put a link here to help you, because really, you should already know.

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The Salt
12:10 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

An Omnivore's Dilemma: Would You Eat Michael Pollan Microbe Cheese?

Microbiologist Christina Agapakis (left) and artist Sissel Tolass show off the cheese they made with bacteria from human skin. The project was part of Agapakis' graduate thesis at Harvard Medical School.
Courtesy of Grow Your Own ... Life After Nature at Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 2:03 pm

Making your own cheese and yogurt is all the rage these days. (Our friends at Kitchen Window broke down the process in a recent post, if you're curious.)

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Harvest Desk
9:33 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Why The 'Turkey Shortage' Won't Affect Your Thanksgiving Meal

No need to panic, there's still plenty of turkey to be had. The "shortage" was only from one company, Butterball, and affected large fresh birds.
Credit tuchodi via Flickr/Creative Commons

Watched the news lately? Then you might’ve heard about impending doom for Thanksgiving dinners across the country.

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Harvest Desk
7:00 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Families In Rural America Brace For Food Stamps Cuts

The town of Sandoval was born along U.S. Route 51, which runs north-south from Kentucky to the state of Wisconsin. Once a booming corridor, this area in southern Illinois now sees extreme poverty.
Peter Gray/WUIS

As farm bill negotiations continue in Washington, D.C., it’s fairly certain that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, will be cut.  One proposal would trim the food stamp program by $4 billion over the next decade; the other would cut roughly ten times that much. 

That’s after the Obama Administration’s recession-era boost to SNAP expired November 1st, leaving the average family with about $30 less to spend each month.

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Food
4:01 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

How Johnnie Walker Is Chasing The World's Middle Class

Johnnie Walker's success has come in part from emerging markets, like Mexico, Brazil and China.
Charley Gallay Getty Images for Johnnie Walker

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 10:39 am

Johnnie Walker Scotch Whisky is just about everywhere. You can find the distinctive square bottle in bars, liquor stores and supermarkets from Milwaukee to Mumbai.

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The Salt
12:46 pm
Sat November 23, 2013

Pepsi Pressured To Fight Big Sugar's 'Land Grab'

Tractors sit on a sugarcane plantation on the land of a Guarani-kaiowá indigenous community in Brazil.
Tatiana Cardeal Courtesy Oxfam

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 11:15 am

The anti-poverty group Oxfam is asking Pepsi's shareholders to approve a resolution that, if passed, would force the company to disclose its sugar suppliers and investigate whether those suppliers are implicated in "land grabs" that unfairly take land from the poor.

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Food
6:35 am
Sat November 23, 2013

Why Turkey Prices Fall At Thanksgiving

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 10:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There are alternatives to turkey, from tofu to spaghetti carbonara, which is what Calvin Trillin says the Pilgrims would have chosen if they'd just known about it. But the center of most traditional Thanksgivings is that browned bird in the middle of the table. Now, it's just basic economics that when demand increases, so does price - except not for turkeys, during the Thanksgiving season.

CATHERINE RAMPELL: The prices will sort of be bumping along, doing their thing throughout the year, and then in November there's a huge drop.

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