Education Desk

Education
4:54 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Income Inequality Is A Major Barrier To Attending College

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 1:27 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

We're continuing our look at how Americans pay for college. Income inequality is a greater barrier to college than in years past.

Here's our colleague David Greene.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Education
4:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

In Tulsa, Combining Preschool With Help For Parents

Shartara Wallace picks up her son James, 4, from preschool in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 10:00 am

At preschools in Tulsa, Okla., teachers are well-educated and well-paid, and classrooms are focused on play, but are still challenging. One nonprofit in Tulsa, the Community Action Project, has flipped the script on preschool. The idea behind its Career Advance program is simple: To help kids, the group believes, you often have to help their parents.

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Education
4:03 am
Wed April 23, 2014

One Approach To Head Start: To Help Kids, Help Their Parents

Tiffany Contreras walks her daughter Kyndall, 4, to preschool at Disney Elementary in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 10:08 am

President Obama has called repeatedly on Congress to help states pay for "high-quality preschool" for all. In fact, those two words — "high quality" — appear time and again in the president's prepared remarks. They are also a refrain among early childhood education advocates and researchers. But what do they mean? And what separates the best of the nation's preschool programs from the rest?

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Education
3:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Who's Getting Preschool Right? Researchers Point To Tulsa

Preschool student Stormy Frazier watches a science experiment unfold in Nikki Jones' classroom in Tulsa, Okla. You can learn more about preschool in Tulsa here.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 5:38 pm

Many educators say quality early childhood education programs give young children a strong foundation for kindergarten and beyond.

But what does a high-quality preschool program look like? Early childhood education researchers point to Tulsa, Okla., as a school system that gets it right. NPR's education team went to Tulsa to find out what help sets the city's preschool program apart. You can read more about what they found — and visit a Tulsa preschool classroom, here.

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Education Desk
3:13 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Referendum Won't Be On Next Ballot Says School Board Pres.

Chuck Flamini
Credit sps186.org

The board president of the Springfield School District says there's no chance a tax referendum will get on the November ballot. 

A community group is pushing an idea to raise property taxes,  and the board's vice president is pushing for a county-wide sales tax hike. Both would benefit district 186, though the county sales-tax hike would help all schools in the county and most the money would have to go to facility costs.

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The Two-Way
10:01 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Study: 2 In 5 Americans Earning Degrees After High School

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 12:37 pm

America may have a shot at rejoining the world's most educated nations by 2025, according to a report released Monday by the Lumina Foundation.

The Indianapolis-based foundation's annual report finds some encouraging data to counter the familiar story of a nation that is famed for its colleges and universities but trails many other countries when it comes to the percentage of people with a degree beyond high school.

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Education Desk
9:27 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Springfield Schools Consider Weekly Late Start Or Early Dismissal

District 186 Headquarters
Credit Rachel Otwell/WUIS

Springfield public schools may start classes later once per week, beginning next school year. But the district is going to garner more public feedback before making a final decision. After district officials spoke with a group of parents, it was clear some are against the original plan of pushing back the start of the school day. Now another option is on the table: early dismissal. Either way - it'd be a redistribution of hours slated for professional development.

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Education
4:03 am
Tue April 22, 2014

For Early Childhood Education, Tulsa, Okla., Stands Out

Preschool students from Nikki Jones's class at Porter Early Childhood Development Center in Tulsa line up in the hallway on their way back from outside play.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 8:54 am

The federal government spends almost $8 billion on preschool programs across the country, mostly on low income 4-year-olds. States spend billions more. But with at least 30 states planning to expand access to pre-K and President Obama promoting "preschool for all," what constitutes a quality preschool program?

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Education
4:03 am
Tue April 22, 2014

What Exactly Is 'High-Quality' Preschool?

Nikki Jones' preschool class at Porter Early Childhood Development Center in Tulsa.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 10:04 am

For years, President Obama has been a vocal booster of early childhood education. In his past two State of the Union addresses, he has called on Congress to help fund preschool for every child in the country.

"Research shows that one of the best investments we can make in a child's life is high-quality early education," Obama told Congress in January.

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Research News
3:56 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Evidence Of Racial, Gender Biases Found In Faculty Mentoring

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 11:34 am

Research found faculty in academic departments linked to more lucrative professions are more likely to discriminate against women and minorities than faculty in fields linked to less lucrative jobs.

Education
11:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

A 'Tennessee Promise' To Educate The State's College Students

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. This spring, along with NPR's Morning Edition, we're helping you navigate the higher education money maze with our "Paying for College" series.

We've heard about how college got so expensive and how families and students are taking on massive loans to pay for it. But today, we want to talk more about an effort to make college not just affordable, but free.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS)

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Education
7:09 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Wait Continues For Schools' Fate Under Proposed New Formula

Sen. Andy Manar, D-Bunker Hill, introduces his Senate Bill 16, which would overhaul how Illinois determines state funding of schools.
Credit Amanda Vinicky

Illinois lawmakers are considering a major change to the way local schools get money from the state. But information about how individual school districts would fare in the new system won't be ready until just before the end of the spring legislative session.

Illinois' schools are primarily funded by local property taxes, which means that there's a big disparity in how much money is spent on a student depending on her zip code.

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Around the Nation
4:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

A Scientific Experiment: Field Trips Just For Teachers

Science teachers huddle over bacteria colonies at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry. The museum plans to train 1,000 area educators to be better science teachers in the next five years.
Linda Lutton WBEZ

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 5:43 pm

In a classroom across from the coal mine exhibit at the Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, students are huddled around tables, studying petri dishes of bacteria.

But these aren't school-age kids — these students are all teachers, responsible for imparting science to upper-elementary or middle-school students.

That's a job that many here — and many teachers in grammar schools around the country — feel unprepared for.

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Education
4:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

'Like Little Language Vacuum Cleaners,' Kids Suck Up Swear Words

Dr. Timothy Jay says children are like "little language vacuum cleaners" that pick up whatever they hear.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 9:49 am

Most parents are pretty concerned about their kids using foul language.

Dr. Timothy Jay, a psychologist and expert in swearing, says parents worried about bad words might be fighting a losing battle.

"As soon as kids start talking, they pick up this kind of language," Jay says. "They're like little language vacuum cleaners, so they repeat what they hear."

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Faith Matters
10:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we turn to a campaign to recognize Muslim religious holidays in the New York public school system. Roughly 10 percent of New York City's public school children are Muslims. And their parents are asking that schools close for the most sacred Muslim holidays. They argue that Christian and Jewish students get their most important holidays off already. Current New York Mayor Bill de Blasio endorsed the idea during his campaign. Take a listen.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAMPAIGN)

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Education
10:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer?

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. This Sunday marks the 15th anniversary of the shootings at Columbine High School. That day, two students opened fire and killed 13 people.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:31 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

The student population at D'Leisha Dent's high school, Central High in Tuscaloosa, Ala., is almost entirely African-American. Dent says she and her peers wish they had more opportunities to interact with white students.
Maisie Crow

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:10 am

The investigative journalism group ProPublica, with reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones, has just completed a yearlong project, Segregation Now, exploring the re-segregation of schools in the U.S., with a particular look at Tuscaloosa, Ala.

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Education
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

You've Served Your Country, Now Get To Class

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This spring, we're joining our colleagues at NPR's Morning Edition to bring you stories that might help you navigate the higher education money maze. And today we want to talk about veterans.

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Education Desk
10:46 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Interview: John Tinker & The Landmark Case On Students' Right To Free Speech

John Tinker
Credit Rachel Otwell/WUIS

Public schools are not allowed to forbid students' right to freedom of speech, unless it disrupts education. But that wasn't necessarily true until a court case from Iowa made its way to the Supreme Court back in the 60s. John Tinker was behind the case, known as Tinker v. Des Moines. He and other students went to school wearing black arm bands to protest the Vietnam War. They were kicked out and told not to come back to class unless they removed the bands and the rest as they say, is history.

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Statehouse Bureau
4:44 am
Thu April 17, 2014

How Much Would Your School District Lose?

Credit flickr/LizMarie_AK

  New data suggests just how big a hit most school districts would take if Illinois' income tax rate rolls back as scheduled at the end of the year.

Illinois' budget could play out a lot of different ways. But under one scenario -- the one Gov. Pat Quinn says will be the case if tax rates aren't kept at five percent -- kindergarten through high school classrooms across Illinois will get $450 million dollars less from the state.

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NPR Story
4:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Pay It Forward Proposal Could Help Students Afford College

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 4:09 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

NPR's been looking at how American families are paying for college and the huge debt some students are racking up. Some states are experimenting with a new idea. It's called Pay It Forward and here's how it works. The state pays for students' tuition. After they graduate and get jobs, the students are expected to repay it.

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WUIS Engage Breakfast
12:48 pm
Sun April 13, 2014

The Impact of Education on the Local Economy

Chris Farrell, Marketplace
Credit APM

Join WUIS in an important community conversation at the first 

A WUIS ENGAGE BREAKFAST
May 2, 2014, 8-9:30 a.m.
Hoogland Center for the Arts - Theatre III
AUDIO SPECIAL COMING SOON!

Special guest, Chris Farrell, is coming to Springfield to share his thoughts and take your questions about education and our local economy.   

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Education Desk
6:57 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Charter Schools: What Does The Future Hold?

Teacher Mr. Gilbert at Roberston Charter School in Decatur
Rachel Otwell/WUIS

Charter schools have long been a divisive issue. Supporters say they allow schools to teach kids free of burdensome regulations.  Opponents say they take money away from traditional schools.  In Illinois this year, those views are colliding.  In the final installment of our series, we find out about the fight at the statehouse and what it might mean for charters:

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Higher Education
3:34 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

UIC Faculty Authorizes Second Strike

Main administration building at UIC
Credit flickr/DanielXONeil

The faculty union at the University of Illinois-Chicago says its members have voted to go ahead with a second strike if negotiations with the university fail to yield an agreement.

The University of Illinois at Chicago United Faculty said in a news release that its members voted Wednesday night to authorize a strike on April 23. The union staged a two-day strike in February.  

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Charter Schools
8:55 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Charter Schools: The Fix Ailing Districts Need?

Students at Ball Charter
Rachel Otwell/WUIS

Nearly two decades ago when the state legislature paved the way for charter schools, Republicans were in control and touted them as an innovative way to improve education by removing many rules and regulations. Now there are about 145 charter school campuses across the state, the vast majority in Chicago. Supporters say they are the change an ailing education system needs, but it's a contentious topic. In this report, the first of a two-part series, we visit a charter school and explore the differing opinions about them:

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

In Turnaround, More Moms Are Staying Home, Study Says

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 2:10 pm

After decades on the decline, the number of "stay at home" moms in the U.S. has risen, with 29 percent of women with children under 18 saying they don't work outside the home, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center.

The figure from 2012 is up from 23 percent in 1999.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
12:00 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Debate: In An Online World, Are Brick And Mortar Colleges Obsolete?

Two teams debated the value of online education in an Intelligence Squared U.S. event at Columbia University.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:18 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

Online degree programs are proliferating – and many cost a fraction of the price of a traditional, on-campus degree. Massive Open Online Courses, known as MOOCS, are also catching on in the U.S. and around the world.

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Education
11:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

With Free Tuition, Mich. Students Hear 'You Are Going To College'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. This spring, we're joining our colleagues at Morning Edition to take a closer look at paying for college. So far in this series, we've talked about navigating the mountains of paperwork, whether working during school is a good idea, and if so, how much is too much. And we've also talked about the huge debt that many students face after graduation. But imagine if all those worries went away.

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StARS Event
11:06 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Students Showcase Their Work At UIS Symposium

Credit UIS

The University of Illinois Springfield campus will give examples of what students have been up to at the upcoming  Student Arts and Research Symposium (StARS).  

From research to art projects, it's all on display. 

"It's an extremely supportive environment," said senior Brianna Werner.  "Both from faculty and other students.  Students come and do class projects at the (symposium). They'll take pictures with you. Take pictures of your posters."

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Education
4:10 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Common Core Literary Standards Require Close Reading

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 7:02 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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