Education Desk

Education
3:38 pm
Thu January 1, 2015

Military's Preschool Program Considered A National Model

Originally published on Thu January 1, 2015 9:34 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

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Education
3:38 pm
Thu January 1, 2015

Four UNC-Chapel Hill Employees Out In Wake Of Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Thu January 1, 2015 9:34 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

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Education
4:15 am
Thu January 1, 2015

Peripatetic Students Thrive At Department Of Defense Schools

Originally published on Thu January 1, 2015 6:48 am

Copyright 2015 WAMU-FM. To see more, visit http://wamu.org.

Book News & Features
2:31 am
Wed December 31, 2014

Vocab Tech For Toddlers Encourages 'Anytime, Anywhere Learning'

The Sesame Workshop app called Big Bird's Words helps children not only learn new vocabulary, but also understand the interconnectedness between words.
Sesame Workshop

Originally published on Wed December 31, 2014 10:54 am

When the children's television show Sesame Street first hit the air in 1969, many were deeply skeptical that you could use TV to introduce very young children to the basics of reading and math. But the experiment proved to be a remarkable success; Sesame Street has reached several generations of toddlers with its combination of educational content and pure entertainment. And now, Sesame Workshop is using new technology to reach the next generation.

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NPR Ed
2:27 am
Wed December 31, 2014

Why Emotional Learning May Be As Important As The ABCs

Thomas O'Donnell reads about Twiggle the Turtle to his kindergartners at Matthew Henson Elementary School in Baltimore.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Wed December 31, 2014 10:03 am

Thomas O'Donnell's kindergarten kids are all hopped up to read about Twiggle the anthropomorphic Turtle.

"Who can tell me why Twiggle here is sad," O'Donnell asks his class at Matthew Henson Elementary School in Baltimore.

"Because he doesn't have no friends," a student pipes up.

And how do people look when they're sad?

"They look down!" the whole class screams out.

Yeah, Twiggle is lonely. But, eventually, he befriends a hedgehog, a duck and a dog. And along the way, he learns how to play, help and share.

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NPR Ed
3:49 pm
Tue December 30, 2014

Common Core Repeal, The Day After

Hugo High School, like many public schools in Oklahoma, was a battleground in the fight over Common Core.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:32 pm

What do the Common Core State Standards have in common with congressional Democrats and the Chicago Cubs?

They all had a really rough year.

Of the 45 states that first adopted the academic standards, many spent 2014 talking about repeal. In Oklahoma (as well as Indiana and South Carolina), it wasn't just talk. The Legislature voted to drop the Core in May. And Gov. Mary Fallin, a longtime champion of the Common Core, signed the repeal in June.

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Education
7:44 am
Tue December 30, 2014

Should Parental Connections Provide A Leg Up In College Admissions?

Edward Blum, director of the Project on Fair Representation, announced at a Nov. 17 news conference the filing of two lawsuits challenging admissions policies at Harvard and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Imagine a democracy where the children of former public officials had a leg up for winning an elected office themselves — a 10,000-vote head start, perhaps, or a seat on the county council reserved especially for them.

Most Americans rightly would scoff at a system that so brazenly allocated rewards based on who your parents are. And yet most American colleges and universities do just that.

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Secret Lives Of Teachers
6:03 am
Tue December 30, 2014

Shaping Wood, Understanding Sound And An Eye For Style

Mike Lindstrom checks the profile of a guitar he's building in his basement workshop.
Courtesy of Mike Lindstrom

Originally published on Tue December 30, 2014 6:26 pm

The NPR Ed team is discovering what teachers do when they're not teaching. Artist? Carpenter? Quidditch player? Explore our Secret Lives of Teachers series.

Name: Mike Lindstrom

School: Kyffin Elementary School

City, State: Golden, Colo.

Subject: General Ed

Grade: 3

Tell us about your secret life.

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Goats and Soda
2:56 am
Tue December 30, 2014

A 'Lost Boy' Helps The Girls Of South Sudan Find An Education

Daniel Majook Gai from South Sudan goes in and out of his war-torn country to help children there go to school.
Courtesy of Project Education South Sudan

Originally published on Tue December 30, 2014 11:17 am

As a boy, Daniel Majook Gai fled the civil war in Sudan, running miles by himself to safety and leaving his family behind. He was one of the so-called Lost Boys — a name given to children separated from their families during that conflict.

After years in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia, Gai landed in the United States, reunited with his family and got an education. In 2011, he returned home to the newly independent country of South Sudan.

But war came back in 2013 and split the new nation.

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NPR Ed
2:13 pm
Mon December 29, 2014

The Man Behind Common Core Math

Jason Zimba, one of the writers of the Common Core, waits while his daughters play.
Julienne Schaer for The Hechinger Report

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 12:29 pm

Every Saturday morning at 10 a.m., Jason Zimba begins a math tutoring session for his two young daughters with the same ritual. Claire, 4, draws on a worksheet while Abigail, 7, pulls addition problems written on strips of paper out of an old Kleenex box decorated like a piggy bank.

If she gets the answer "lickety-split," as her dad says, she can check it off. If she doesn't, the problem goes back in the box, to try the following week.

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
12:14 pm
Mon December 29, 2014

UI Chancellor Responds To Salaita Report

Phyllis Wise, chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Credit news.illinois.edu

Here is Chancellor Phyllis Wise's full statement in response to the report of the Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure's analysis of the university's handling of Steven Salaita's dismissal:

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Education
4:42 pm
Sun December 28, 2014

Lily McBeth Pioneered Classroom Opportunities For Transgender Teachers

Originally published on Sun December 28, 2014 5:02 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
6:39 am
Sun December 28, 2014

'Military Children': Their Struggles, Sacrifices And Strengths

Military Children from WAMU's Breaking Ground project sheds light on the challenges of being the child of soldiers.
Kavitha Cardoza/WAMU

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 8:31 am

We've all seen the photo: A soldier in fatigues stoops down to hug his child one last time before heading off to a war zone.

We may have an idea of what comes next for the soldier, but rarely do we discuss what's next for the child.

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NPR Ed
11:03 am
Fri December 26, 2014

An Update On Screen Time

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Sat December 27, 2014 12:53 am

NPR Ed is updating some of the top stories we've been following in 2014.

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The Salt
3:18 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

What Would Jesus Drink? A Class Exploring Ancient Wines Asks

An illustration depicts Jesus Christ transforming water into wine during the wedding at Cana (John 2:7).
Joseph Martin Kronheim Kean Collection/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 12:16 am

Inside the Boston Wine School, Jonathon Alsop places empty glasses and plates of figs and cheese before a small group of students. Alsop, who founded the school in 2000, is doing a test run of a new class that poses the question: What would Jesus drink?

"This is ... a cheese that Jesus might have eaten," he tells students. "It's called Egyptian Roumy — it was a cheese that was introduced to the Egyptians by the Romans. It's a sheep's milk cheese."

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NPR Ed
3:18 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

Where Ebola Has Closed Schools, A Radio Program Provides A Faint Signal Of Hope

Florence Allen Jones, right, is part of the education ministry's classes-by-radio team.
John W. Poole/NPR

Originally published on Mon December 29, 2014 11:13 am

Florence Allen Jones used to teach in Washington, D.C., before coming back home to Liberia.

Now she's part of the education ministry's teaching-by-radio team. Working with UNICEF and another nonprofit, Talking Drum, in Monrovia, the capital of Liberia, the government aims to provide lessons to children across the country, hit by the Ebola outbreak. Most schools closed this past summer and will likely remain closed for months.

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Goats and Soda
6:03 am
Thu December 25, 2014

Will The Taliban Attack Make Parents Afraid To Send Kids To School?

These Pakistani children go to a makeshift school in a clay house, located in a poor neighborhood on the outskirts of Islamabad.
Muhammed Muheisen AP

Last week, the Taliban attacked the Army Public School in Peshawar, Pakistan, killing more than 140 people, most of them schoolchildren.

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The Two-Way
9:25 am
Wed December 24, 2014

Teacher Wins $150,000 Prize — And Donates It All To Her School

Third-grade teacher Nikki Bollerman, 26, won a contest that gave her students books for the holidays. When she also won $150,000, she decided it should go to her school.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed December 24, 2014 2:43 pm

One thing's for sure: Nikki Bollerman believes in her school and the kids who go there. How else to explain Bollerman, 26, giving a $150,000 windfall to the Boston area public charter school where she teaches third grade?

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NPR Ed
7:08 am
Wed December 24, 2014

An Update On For-Profit Colleges

A person walks past an Everest Institute sign in an office building in Silver Spring, Md., on July 8.
Jose Luis Magana AP

NPR Ed is updating readers on some of the top stories we've been following in 2014.

There was lots of news coming out of the for-profit education sector this year, most of it related to regulatory action.

As we reported earlier,

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
8:48 pm
Tue December 23, 2014

UI Faculty Association President Calls Salaita Report A Game Changer

Bruce Rosenstock

    

  Bruce Rosenstock, president of the Campus Faculty Association at the University of Illinois, said the report released today by the school’s Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure is a “bombshell and a game changer” that will force university officials to revisit their decision to not hire controversial professor Steven Salaita.

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
4:43 pm
Tue December 23, 2014

Report Critical Of University Officials' Dismissal Of Salaita

Steven Salaita held a press conference at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the summer.
Credit Jim Meadows, WILL

A committee investigating the University of Illinois’ handling of Steven Salaita -- a professor whose job offer with the university was withdrawn due to his social media posts -- issued a report today criticizing school officials.  Phyllis Wise, chancellor of the University of Illinois’ main campus, violated procedures when she failed to consult key academic officers before telling a controversial professor that he would not get the job he had been promised.

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Education
3:21 pm
Tue December 23, 2014

Conquering Anatomy On The Way To A Stable Career

Originally published on Tue December 23, 2014 5:26 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
1:33 pm
Tue December 23, 2014

An Update From New Orleans

Students at KIPP Central City Primary School raise their hands during a social studies class on August 14, 2014 in New Orleans. The school's student body is nearly 100 percent black in a system that is 85 percent black.
Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

Originally published on Wed December 24, 2014 12:34 am

NPR Ed is updating readers on some of the top stories we've been following in 2014.

All this year, NPR Ed has been exploring the dramatic changes to the New Orleans school system, where more than nine out of ten children attend charter schools, most run by the state Recovery School District.

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NPR Ed
6:58 am
Tue December 23, 2014

Even More Secret Lives Of Teachers

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue December 23, 2014 9:21 am


Tell us about the Secret Lives of Teachers — maybe your own or a teacher you know. Or post your own Secret Life on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram at #secretteachers. We're on Twitter at @npr_ed. Our Facebook page is here or you can drop us an email at NPREd@npr.org.

Education
3:44 pm
Mon December 22, 2014

Groups Warn Of Dangers With Funding Of Universities By Koch Brothers

Originally published on Mon December 22, 2014 4:50 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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NPR Ed
6:23 am
Mon December 22, 2014

An Update On LA's iPad Program

NPR Ed is updating some of the top stories we've been following in 2014.

The 650,000 students in the Los Angeles Unified School District expected to be tapping and scrolling on their very own iPads by now, halfway through the school year.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Sat December 20, 2014

12 Weeks To A 6-Figure Job

A student at the coder boot camp at General Assembly in New York City learns more than "Hello, world."
Courtesy of General Assembly

Originally published on Mon December 22, 2014 10:26 am

Marlon Frausto is in pursuit of the new American dream. Just a few weeks ago, he left his job, in Hispanic marketing for the legal industry, and moved to San Francisco.

Every day he wakes at 5:30 a.m., commutes 45 minutes by train, and studies until 9 or 10 at night. He's spending down his savings and says he's getting help from "my loving family."

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Law
5:06 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

Troubled By Grand Jury Verdicts, Students Request More Time For Exams

Thousands gathered on the National Mall last week to protest the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown. Some law students say their involvement in the protests means their exams should be postponed.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 6:50 pm

"The dog ate my homework?" Try, "I was protesting a grand jury decision," instead.

Students at some top law schools want exam extensions for what they are calling the trauma of the Michael Brown and Eric Garner grand jury decisions. But other law students are wondering what message that sends to future employers.

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NPR Ed
4:04 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

The Fate Of The Administration's College Ratings

Rating colleges isn't easy.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Sat December 20, 2014 1:21 am

Today, details of the Obama administration's plan known as the Postsecondary Institutional Ratings System, or PIRS, finally saw the light of day. The idea, in this incarnation, was just under three years old.

The president announced its conception during his State of the Union address in 2012.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Fri December 19, 2014

Education Dept. Issues Framework For New College Rating System

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 10:59 am

Beginning next year, colleges and universities will be judged on three broad criteria when it comes to meting out federal financial aid: access, affordability and student outcomes, according to a new "framework" released by the Education Department.

The ratings plan was first announced by President Obama in August 2013, but the framework announced today is only an interim step. Public input is being sought by Feb. 17 on the proposed system.

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