Education Desk

Education Desk
6:01 am
Thu May 1, 2014

New District 186 Superintendent Starts Today

Jennifer Gill
Credit WUIS

Jennifer Gill assumes her duties as Springfield District 186 Superintendent today.  Gill is a native of Springfield and has worked as a teacher, administrator and building principal in the district.

More recently she served as Director of Teaching and Learning at McLean County Unit 5 in Bloomington Normal.

This is her first job as superintendent.  She inherits a district facing annual budget deficits and disagreement over whether or not to try for a tax referendum.  She'll also have to work with a board that has previously fought publicly over a variety of issues.

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Paying For College
2:40 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Is It Still College Without Football?

ImageZoo/Corbis

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 8:02 am

A small number of universities are starting to go against the grain, reducing amenities and frills in favor of keeping the costs relatively low.

Neil Theobald is the president of Temple University, which recently began offering students $4,000 per year in grants — if they promise to limit the number of hours they work during the school year and graduate on time.

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Education
3:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

As Testing Season Opens In Schools, Some Ask: How Much Is Too Much?

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 5:18 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

If you're a high school student or you have one at home, then you know it's testing season. America's teenagers spend countless hours taking standardized state and district tests, not to mention the alphabet soup of SAT, ACT, AP, and the list goes on.

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Education
3:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

U.S. Tests Teens A Lot, But Worldwide, Exam Stakes Are Higher

Students in Manchester, England, celebrate the results of their college entrance exams.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 6:06 pm

High school students in the U.S. take lots of standardized tests. There are state tests, new Common Core-aligned field tests, and an alphabet soup of others like the PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) and NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) exams, the SAT, ACT, AP and IB.

It's a lot by any objective measure. Parents and teens often charge that America tests its students more than any other nation in the world. But really, how does the U.S.'s test tally compare with what kids are taking elsewhere in the world?

England

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Can I Just Tell You?
11:35 am
Wed April 30, 2014

First Lady Not First Priority For Graduates

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
11:35 am
Wed April 30, 2014

Lawmakers, Educators Target Sexual Assault On Campus

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to start our program today with an issue that has been in the news of late, but it has been on the minds of many college students and their families long before that. And that issue is sexual assault on college campuses. The Department of Justice says 1 in 5 women has been sexually assaulted while in college. So the Obama administration is out with new guidelines for colleges about how to stop this behavior.

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Shots - Health News
11:08 am
Wed April 30, 2014

To Get Help From A Little Kid, Ask The Right Way

Need a hand with those dishes?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:31 am

Motivating children to stop playing and help out with chores isn't exactly an easy sell, as most parents and teachers will attest. But how you ask can make all the difference, psychologists say.

If you say something like, "Please help me," the kids are more likely to keep playing with their Legos. But ask them, "Please be a helper," and they'll be more responsive, researchers report Wednesday in the journal Child Development.

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Education
10:01 am
Wed April 30, 2014

What Are Education Tests For, Anyway?

The all-too-familiar No. 2 pencil.
Josh Davis Flickr

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 3:30 pm

Pay attention to this piece. There's going to be a test at the end.

Did that trigger scary memories of the 10th grade? Or are you just curious how you'll measure up?

If the answer is "C: Either of the above," keep reading.

Tests have existed throughout the history of education. Today they're being used more than ever before — but not necessarily as designed.

Different types of tests are best for different purposes. Some help students learn better. Some are there to sort individuals. Others help us understand how a whole population is doing.

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Education
3:28 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Small Gains, But Much Left To Fix, In Campus Sexual Assault Cases

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:40 pm

In 2010, NPR's Joe Shapiro led an investigation into sexual assault on college campuses. As the White House releases its own report on the subject, Shapiro explains what's changed since 2010 — and what hasn't.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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News
3:24 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

White House Report Lays Out Plans For Combating Campus Sexual Assault

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:40 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. The White House is taking on the issue of campus sexual assault. Today, it released a series of recommendations aimed at prevention and enforcement. As part of the campaign, the administration cited a stark statistic. They say one-in-five women is sexually assaulted in college. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

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Education
10:37 am
Tue April 29, 2014

US High School Graduation Rate Hits All-Time High, Per Report

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 11:40 am

Transcript

MARTIN MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'd like to start today with some good news about our nation's schools. A new report shows that U.S. public high schools have reached an 80 percent graduation rate. That data comes from the National Center for Education Statistics.

We wanted to find out more, so we've called upon Emily Richmond. She is the public editor of the Education Writers Association, and she joins us from member station WABE in Atlanta, Georgia. Emily, welcome back. Thanks for joining us once again.

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The Two-Way
9:14 am
Tue April 29, 2014

Campus Sexual Assaults Are Targeted In New White House Report

A White House task force on sexual assault at college campuses issued new guidelines Tuesday, asking colleges to survey students about their experiences. The task force was headed by Vice President Biden's office and the White House Council on Women and Girls, which is led by Tina Tchen.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 1:01 pm

Noting that 1 in 5 women is sexually assaulted in college, the White House is releasing new guidelines to help victims of that violence and improve the way schools handle such cases. Campus sexual assaults are notoriously underreported, and schools' disciplinary processes vary widely.

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Around the Nation
4:31 am
Tue April 29, 2014

Student Activists Fight To Stem Sexual Assaults

In January, President Obama attended an event for the Council on Women and Girls where he signed a memorandum creating a task force to respond to campus rapes.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:15 pm

The White House is out this morning with new recommendations to protect students from sexual assault, with a focus on the college years. These are the first results from a task force formed earlier this year aimed at addressing a problem that's getting a lot more attention on college campuses than it used to.

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Music
1:03 am
Tue April 29, 2014

The Public School Where The Duke Lives On

Trumpeter Geraldo Marshall and trombonist Johannes Utas, students at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts, rehearse for their school's 40th anniversary celebration.
Lauren Migaki NPR

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 11:52 am

Duke Ellington didn't consider himself a jazz musician.

He said he was a musician who played jazz. And what a musician: pianist, bandleader, composer of more than 1,000 songs including standards like "Don't Get Around Much Anymore," "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)," "Satin Doll" and "Sophisticated Lady."

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Education reform
5:58 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

Harvard Professor: Investments In Teaching, Early Childhood Translate To Student Success

Dr. Paul Reville, Harvard professor and former Mass. Secretary of Education.
Credit Courtesy of Harvard University's Graduate School of Education

  Education is among the top issues being debated this spring, as lawmakers consider changing the way schools are funded in Illinois. Republicans and Democrats alike agree that something must be done as the state moves into the future.

WUIS/Illinois Public Radio recently caught up with Dr. Paul Reville, an education expert from Harvard University. Reville was an architect of Massachusetts' school reform in the 1990's, and was in Springfield to share his knowledge on overhauling education.

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Education
11:31 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Steve Jobs' Death Inspired Goal To Get Kids Coding

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. In a few minutes, we are going to tell you more about former Texas governor Ann Richards. There's a new HBO documentary about her, and we are going to speak with her daughter. But first, something we like to focus on a lot on this program, which is efforts to open up tech careers and education to young people. Computer programming is one of the most sought after skills in the job market.

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All Tech Considered
10:58 am
Mon April 28, 2014

What Parents Need To Know About Big Data And Student Privacy

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 10:53 am

My first brush with professional journalism — and with violations of student privacy — came when I was a sophomore at Yale. It was 1999, and George W. Bush, a Yale alumnus, was running for president.

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Education
5:36 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Learning With Disabilities: One Effort To Shake Up The Classroom

Samuel Habib, seen here at 3 years old, sits in his supportive corner chair in class. Samuel, who has cerebral palsy, is now 14 and is headed to high school. Dan Habib, Samuel's father, is an advocate for inclusion and made a film about his son called Including Samuel.
Dan Habib/includingsamuel.com

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 8:54 am

This is what an inclusive classroom looks like: Children with disabilities sit next to ones who've been deemed "gifted and talented." The mixing is done carefully, and quietly. Students don't necessarily know who's working at what level.

Despite a court ruling 25 years ago that gave children with disabilities equal access to general education activities, change has been slow.

Today, about 17 percent of students with any disability spend all or most of their days segregated. Children with severe disabilities can still expect that separation.

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Education
4:29 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

Struggling To Get Out Of Poverty: The 'Two Generation' Approach

Tiffany Contreras gives a presentation in a nutrition class at Tulsa Community College. She's pursuing a degree in nursing as part of the Career Advance program.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 1:15 pm

Policy makers and thinkers have long debated how best to help low-income families break the cycle of generational poverty. A lot of people think one key is high-quality early childhood education. Others say equally important is support parents with job training and education, to get them into stable, decent paying jobs.

In Tulsa, Okla., an experimental program is trying to do both. Career Advance gives vulnerable mothers access to high-quality preschool as well as to life coaching, financial incentives and intensive job training in in-demand fields like nursing and health care.

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All Tech Considered
9:04 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Stopping Link Rot: Aiming To End A Virtual Epidemic

An 404 message appears when the linked page has been moved or deleted.
Devon Yu iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 10:30 am

Just about anyone who's gone online has encountered the message: "Error 404" or page "Not Found." It's what you see when a link is broken or dead — when the resource is no longer available.

It happens all across the Internet, on blogs, news websites, even links cited in decisions by the Supreme Court. It's called link rot, and it spreads over time as more pages die.

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Education
3:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Wash. Loses 'No Child Left Behind' Waiver Over Teacher Evaluations

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 6:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Washington has become the first state to lose its waiver to the No Child Left Behind Act. Most states have waivers to some of the more stringent requirements of the 2001 federal law but those waivers come with conditions. As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, Washington is being punished because it didn't fulfill a condition that is very dear to the Obama administration.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: What the administration wants is simple. Teachers should be evaluated, in part, on how their students do on standardized tests.

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News
3:04 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Northwestern Players Cast Union Vote — But Results Will Have To Wait

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 6:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

It's a historic day on the campus of Northwestern University. Football players there became the first college athletes in this country to vote on whether to unionize. The results may not be known for some time. The National Labor Relations Board is reviewing Northwestern's appeal of an earlier ruling to allow this union vote to take place. NPR's David Schaper reports.

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News
3:04 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Columbia Comes Under Fire For Handling Of Sexual Assault Cases

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 6:15 pm

Twenty-three students from Columbia and Barnard say that the university is mishandling allegations of sexual assault. They filed federal complaints with the Department of Education on Thursday.

Around the Nation
4:06 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Northwestern Players To Vote On Historic Union Question

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 7:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It is an historic day at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Seventy-six scholarship football players are eligible to vote on whether or not to form the first labor union for college athletes.

Today's vote was set up by a National Labor Relations Board ruling last month that said players qualified as employees of the university, giving them the right to unionize.

NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us now to help us sort this out. Tom, good morning.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hello.

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Around the Nation
4:03 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Alternatives Emerge To Affirmative Action

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 7:09 am

Opponents of affirmative action have often touted alternatives, like socio-economic based admissions, or targeted outreach. David Greene talks to University of Washington professor Mark Long.

News
3:53 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

NCAA Directors Decide To Allow More Freedom To Wealthier Schools

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:17 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Today, the NCAA announced what could be major changes in the way it operates. Among those potential changes, more autonomy for the five wealthiest Division 1 conferences and more benefits for student athletes. The board of directors endorsed the moves today at their headquarters in Indianapolis. Final approval could come in August, when the board meets next.

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Education Desk
11:17 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Aging Population Biggest Economic and Financial Challenge Ahead

Chris Farrell appearing in Springfield May 2.
Credit APM

Marketplace Economics Editor and Business Week columnist Chris Farrell says the aging of the population is the biggest economic and personal finance challenge ahead.  Speaking with WUIS Executive Editor Bill Wheelhouse, Farrell says people can expect to work longer in the years ahead.  

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Education
11:14 am
Thu April 24, 2014

First Lady Of Men's Studies Says Passion Is Key

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 11:07 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. In a few minutes, we will hear from the multitalented Debbie Allen. She's an actress, dancer, choreographer, director, producer. She will be here to tell us about her latest project and how she's trying to get more men and boys dancing with a project she's casting now.

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Paying For College
2:37 am
Thu April 24, 2014

When Money Trumps Need In College Admissions

For many low-income students, economic trends are making the prospect of getting into the college of their choice, and reaching graduation, even more difficult.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 11:51 am

At some schools, the admissions process itself can work against low-income students, according to Georgia Nugent, former president of Kenyon College and a senior fellow at the Council of Independent Colleges.

Nugent says during her tenure at Kenyon, there were low-income students at the bottom of the admissions list who sometimes weren't accepted so the school could make room for more affluent students.

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Education: Watch This Space
4:24 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

In Age Of Custom-Tailored Ed Tech, Teachers Shop Off The Rack

Free software is fun!
reynermedia Flickr

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:38 pm

The big names in the growing education-technology industry gathered in Arizona this week.

The "Education Innovation Summit" styles itself the "Davos of ed-tech." Educators, philanthropists and political leaders like Jeb Bush rubbed elbows with the investors, venture capitalists, big companies like Microsoft and small companies hoping to get big. It's hosted by Arizona State University and GSV, a private equity firm.

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