Education Desk

The Two-Way
5:03 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Poll: Prestigious Colleges Won't Make You Happier In Life Or Work

Harvard's Hasty Pudding Theatricals. According to a recent Gallup poll, only 2 percent of college graduates with $20,000 to $40,000 in undergraduate loans said they were "thriving."
TPapi Flickr

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 8:38 am

There's plenty of anxiety in the U.S. over getting into a top college. But a new Gallup poll suggests that, later in life, it doesn't matter nearly as much as we think. In fact, when you ask college graduates whether they're "engaged" with their work or "thriving" in all aspects of their lives, their responses don't vary one bit whether they went to a prestigious college or not.

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Code Switch
2:45 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Can Student Journalists Ban 'Redskins' From Their School Paper?

This mural by the football field features Neshaminy's mascot.
Aaron Moselle NPR

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:34 am

"Redskins."

That word sits at the center of a controversy in suburban Philadelphia. It's pitted student journalists against school board members, but has left the school community largely shrugging its shoulders.

Student editors at Neshaminy High School in Bucks County have vowed not to print the word, which is the school's Native American mascot.

The Neshaminy School Board, however, is expected to vote later this month on a policy that would reverse the ban.

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Education
3:02 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Bereft Of Legal Shield, Scholars' Work Is Open To Federal Eyes

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 5:35 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In the case of the 1972 murder and the oral history interviews that are said to shed light on it, did Boston College have a right to resist disclosure of the interviews in its archive? Well, Harvard law professor Noah Feldman addressed that question in a column for Bloomberg View, and he joins us now. Welcome to the program.

NOAH FELDMAN: Thank you for having me.

SIEGEL: And, first is there any federal law defending an academic researcher's right to keep the confidence of an interviewee?

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Code Switch
9:36 am
Mon May 5, 2014

After Decades, A University By And For Latinos Will Shut Its Doors

The National Hispanic University sits in the shadow of the East San Jose foothills in a working-class Latino neighborhood.
Shereen Marisol Meraji

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:34 am

The National Hispanic University was created more than 30 years ago to educate first-generation college students from Latino backgrounds. Next year, the only school of its kind west of the Mississippi will close its doors.

NHU sits in the shadow of the East San Jose foothills in California's Silicon Valley. All the classrooms and faculty offices fit in one modern three-story building in the heart of a working-class Latino neighborhood. But the postwar elementary school right next door used to serve as the institution's hallowed halls.

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Education
3:53 pm
Sun May 4, 2014

What Do Yale Grad Students Want? A Union

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 5:19 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

From NPR West in Culver City, California it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Arun Rath. Hundreds of graduate assistants at Yale University say they want to be allowed to decide whether to unionize. Grad students at two nearby universities recently formed unions after two very different types of organizing campaigns. One sailed by in a matter of weeks. The other took many years.

Diane Orson of member station WNPR reports from New Haven.

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Sports
6:38 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Football Team Helps Make One High School Out Of Two

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 12:06 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

At Martin Luther King High School in Philadelphia, football is more than a sport. It's an escape.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "WE COULD BE KING")

UNIDENTIFIED STUDENT #1: I plan to move out of Philly 'cause it's not getting any better.

UNIDENTIFIED STUDENT #2: Hearing gunshots on a daily basis was nothing new. If you live in Philadelphia, I'm sure you agree, life is rough. Times are hard and sometimes you want to give up. I do, too.

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Education
8:52 am
Sat May 3, 2014

Gerry Adams' Arrest Calls Educational Privacy Into Question

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 9:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. This week, Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams was arrested in connection to a 1972 murder. He has been accused of being behind the crime. There has never been enough evidence to warrant his arrest. But then came what's known as the Belfast Project. Former IRA members gave a series of candid, even confessional, interviews to researchers at Boston College.

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The Two-Way
11:30 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Sinn Fein Leader's Arrest Ignites Debate Over Academic Freedom

Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams was arrested Wednesday as part of an investigation into one of Northern Ireland's most controversial killings.
Neil Hall Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 1:02 pm

The arrest of Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams this week in Northern Ireland is raising questions about academic freedom across the Atlantic.

As NPR's Scott Neuman reported:

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Paying For College
11:29 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Tough Lessons On Debt For College Students

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 3:49 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This spring, we joined our colleagues at Morning Edition for a series called Paying for College. It's exactly what it sounds like. We're trying to figure out how people are navigating the college money maze.

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Education
6:07 am
Fri May 2, 2014

College Applicant Had 'Fingers Crossed For A Full Ride'

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 11:05 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It turns out Tao's situation is common. According to the American Freshman Survey, most students were accepted by their first-choice colleges last year; that's the good news. But when you look at the students accepted by colleges - their first choice - almost half actually enrolled somewhere else for financial reasons. To find out more, our colleague David Greene spoke with Sylvia Hurtado, head of the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA, which conducts the survey.

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Education
6:05 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Many Seniors Accepted To First-Choice Colleges Go Elsewhere

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:38 am

According to the American Freshman Survey, most students were accepted by their first-choice colleges last year — but almost half of them actually enrolled in other schools, primarily for financial reasons.

To find out more, Morning Edition's David Greene spoke with Sylvia Hurtado, head of the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA, which conducts the annual survey.


Interview Highlights

On forgoing their first-choice schools

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Education
4:25 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Feds List Schools Under Investigation For Abuse Claims

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

A Supreme Court justice famously said that sunlight is the best disinfectant. Louis Brandeis meant that publicity changes bad behavior, and this appears to be the theory followed by the U.S. Department of Education. For the first time, the department released names of colleges and universities that are currently under investigation for the way they have handled sexual assaults.

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The Two-Way
4:13 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Ending 5-Year Dispute, New York Reaches Deal With Teachers Union

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 4:25 pm

New York has reached a deal with its teachers union, ending a five-year stalemate, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Thursday.

The New York Times reports de Blasio, a liberal Democrat taking on a tough issue during his first year in office, called it a "landmark" labor deal. The Times adds:

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

55 Colleges, Universities Under Investigation For Abuse Claims

People tour the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., in 2012. Harvard was one of 55 institutions on the Education Department's newly released list.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 3:26 pm

The Department of Education has released a list of 55 colleges and universities facing investigation under Title IX for their handling of sexual abuse claims.

Releasing the list is described as an unprecedented move. NPR's Brian Naylor says the list "starts at Arizona State University and ends at the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine."

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Paying For College
10:50 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Tribal Colleges Do More With Less

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 11:27 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This spring we're joining our colleagues at Morning Edition to take a closer look at paying for college. We're talking about the challenge of getting through that higher education money maze. Today, we're looking at how Native Americans are facing this challenge, and it's a challenge for most Americans. But as a group, Native Americans have the highest poverty rate of any ethnic or racial group in this country.

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Race
10:50 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Black Colleges Face State Funding Crunch

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 11:27 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Today is a big day for many students around the country. This is the final day for those high school seniors lucky enough to have a choice to make their final decisions about which college or university they will attend.

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Education Desk
8:15 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Professor Says Higher Ed Spending Brings Long Term Benefits

Walter McMahon
Credit IGPA

Illinois budget cutting has targeted higher education for more than a decade.   But a professor who has studied funding for colleges says it actually leads to more state financial problems.
 

Walter McMahon is a Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Illinois.  He says more investment would serve the state well in the future.

McMahon's column below on higher education spending is part of the Institute of Government and Public Affairs' Illinois Budget Policy Toolbox.

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Education Desk
6:01 am
Thu May 1, 2014

New District 186 Superintendent Starts Today

Jennifer Gill
Credit WUIS

Jennifer Gill assumes her duties as Springfield District 186 Superintendent today.  Gill is a native of Springfield and has worked as a teacher, administrator and building principal in the district.

More recently she served as Director of Teaching and Learning at McLean County Unit 5 in Bloomington Normal.

This is her first job as superintendent.  She inherits a district facing annual budget deficits and disagreement over whether or not to try for a tax referendum.  She'll also have to work with a board that has previously fought publicly over a variety of issues.

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Paying For College
2:40 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Is It Still College Without Football?

ImageZoo/Corbis

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 8:02 am

A small number of universities are starting to go against the grain, reducing amenities and frills in favor of keeping the costs relatively low.

Neil Theobald is the president of Temple University, which recently began offering students $4,000 per year in grants — if they promise to limit the number of hours they work during the school year and graduate on time.

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Education
3:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

As Testing Season Opens In Schools, Some Ask: How Much Is Too Much?

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 5:18 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

If you're a high school student or you have one at home, then you know it's testing season. America's teenagers spend countless hours taking standardized state and district tests, not to mention the alphabet soup of SAT, ACT, AP, and the list goes on.

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Education
3:00 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

U.S. Tests Teens A Lot, But Worldwide, Exam Stakes Are Higher

Students in Manchester, England, celebrate the results of their college entrance exams.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 6:06 pm

High school students in the U.S. take lots of standardized tests. There are state tests, new Common Core-aligned field tests, and an alphabet soup of others like the PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) and NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) exams, the SAT, ACT, AP and IB.

It's a lot by any objective measure. Parents and teens often charge that America tests its students more than any other nation in the world. But really, how does the U.S.'s test tally compare with what kids are taking elsewhere in the world?

England

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Can I Just Tell You?
11:35 am
Wed April 30, 2014

First Lady Not First Priority For Graduates

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
11:35 am
Wed April 30, 2014

Lawmakers, Educators Target Sexual Assault On Campus

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to start our program today with an issue that has been in the news of late, but it has been on the minds of many college students and their families long before that. And that issue is sexual assault on college campuses. The Department of Justice says 1 in 5 women has been sexually assaulted while in college. So the Obama administration is out with new guidelines for colleges about how to stop this behavior.

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Shots - Health News
11:08 am
Wed April 30, 2014

To Get Help From A Little Kid, Ask The Right Way

Need a hand with those dishes?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:31 am

Motivating children to stop playing and help out with chores isn't exactly an easy sell, as most parents and teachers will attest. But how you ask can make all the difference, psychologists say.

If you say something like, "Please help me," the kids are more likely to keep playing with their Legos. But ask them, "Please be a helper," and they'll be more responsive, researchers report Wednesday in the journal Child Development.

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Education
10:01 am
Wed April 30, 2014

What Are Education Tests For, Anyway?

The all-too-familiar No. 2 pencil.
Josh Davis Flickr

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 3:30 pm

Pay attention to this piece. There's going to be a test at the end.

Did that trigger scary memories of the 10th grade? Or are you just curious how you'll measure up?

If the answer is "C: Either of the above," keep reading.

Tests have existed throughout the history of education. Today they're being used more than ever before — but not necessarily as designed.

Different types of tests are best for different purposes. Some help students learn better. Some are there to sort individuals. Others help us understand how a whole population is doing.

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Education
3:28 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Small Gains, But Much Left To Fix, In Campus Sexual Assault Cases

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:40 pm

In 2010, NPR's Joe Shapiro led an investigation into sexual assault on college campuses. As the White House releases its own report on the subject, Shapiro explains what's changed since 2010 — and what hasn't.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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News
3:24 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

White House Report Lays Out Plans For Combating Campus Sexual Assault

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:40 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. The White House is taking on the issue of campus sexual assault. Today, it released a series of recommendations aimed at prevention and enforcement. As part of the campaign, the administration cited a stark statistic. They say one-in-five women is sexually assaulted in college. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

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Education
10:37 am
Tue April 29, 2014

US High School Graduation Rate Hits All-Time High, Per Report

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 11:40 am

Transcript

MARTIN MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'd like to start today with some good news about our nation's schools. A new report shows that U.S. public high schools have reached an 80 percent graduation rate. That data comes from the National Center for Education Statistics.

We wanted to find out more, so we've called upon Emily Richmond. She is the public editor of the Education Writers Association, and she joins us from member station WABE in Atlanta, Georgia. Emily, welcome back. Thanks for joining us once again.

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The Two-Way
9:14 am
Tue April 29, 2014

Campus Sexual Assaults Are Targeted In New White House Report

A White House task force on sexual assault at college campuses issued new guidelines Tuesday, asking colleges to survey students about their experiences. The task force was headed by Vice President Biden's office and the White House Council on Women and Girls, which is led by Tina Tchen.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 1:01 pm

Noting that 1 in 5 women is sexually assaulted in college, the White House is releasing new guidelines to help victims of that violence and improve the way schools handle such cases. Campus sexual assaults are notoriously underreported, and schools' disciplinary processes vary widely.

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Around the Nation
4:31 am
Tue April 29, 2014

Student Activists Fight To Stem Sexual Assaults

In January, President Obama attended an event for the Council on Women and Girls where he signed a memorandum creating a task force to respond to campus rapes.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:15 pm

The White House is out this morning with new recommendations to protect students from sexual assault, with a focus on the college years. These are the first results from a task force formed earlier this year aimed at addressing a problem that's getting a lot more attention on college campuses than it used to.

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