Education Desk

The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

U.Va. Reinstates Fraternity Accused In 'Rolling Stone' Rape Story

The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. The fraternity was at the center of a controversial Rolling Stone article describing an alleged gang rape at the school.
Steve Helber AP

The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity at the center of a disputed Rolling Stone account of an alleged gang rape at the University of Virginia has been reinstated, according to a statement released on the school's website Monday.

Read more
NPR Ed
12:09 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

Arne Duncan Wants To Drop 'No Child Left Behind' — But Keep Its Tests

Education Secretary Arne Duncan speaks with reporters after he and Attorney General Eric Holder toured the Northern Virginia Juvenile Detention Center on Dec. 8, 2014.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 3:11 pm

In a speech Monday at an elementary school in Washington, D.C., Education Secretary Arne Duncan laid out the president's position on the nation's largest federal education law, even as debate unfolds over the law's re-authorization.

Read more
Illinois Issues - Education Desk
10:25 am
Mon January 12, 2015

Differentials: How Universities Charge Higher Prices For Certain Majors

 

For the first time in two decades, the University of Illinois plans to hold basic tuition rates steady for the upcoming school term. But that proposal, adopted by the U. of I. budget committee on January 5, comes with a caveat.

 

Read more
NPR Ed
6:28 am
Mon January 12, 2015

Meet The Classroom Of The Future

A blended learning classroom at David Boody Jr. High School in New York City.
Courtesy of New Classrooms

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 12:17 pm

The classroom of the future probably won't be led by a robot with arms and legs, but it may be guided by a digital brain.

It may look like this: one room, about the size of a basketball court; more than 100 students, all plugged into a laptop; and 15 teachers and teaching assistants.

This isn't just the future, it's the sixth grade math class at David Boody Jr. High School in Brooklyn, near Coney Island. Beneath all the human buzz, something other than humans is running the show: algorithms.

Read more
NPR Ed
8:23 am
Sat January 10, 2015

Sketchucation: #EdPredictions For 2015

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 10:43 am

So what will happen in the education world this year? Last week we brought you some provocative predictions. We were also curious to see what you thought.

With a little magic from our illustrator, LA Johnson, here are a few of our favorites from the #EdPredictions hashtag:

Read more
The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Former Florida A&M Student Sentenced To 6 Years In Hazing Death

Dante Martin addresses the parents of Robert Champion on the witness stand on Friday. Martin was sentenced to six years in connection with the hazing death of Champion.
Red Huber AP

Originally published on Fri January 9, 2015 7:18 pm

A judge in Florida has sentenced former Florida A&M University student Dante Martin to six years in prison for manslaughter and felony hazing in the 2011 death of his fellow band member, drum major Robert Champion.

Read more
NPR Ed
2:26 am
Fri January 9, 2015

A 'Sizable Decrease' In Those Passing The GED

Kaylin Wainwright (center) works with student Natnael Gebremariam (left) during a GED preparation class in Washington, D.C. Seated at right is student Sibusiso Kunene.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 5:54 pm

One year after the launch of a major overhaul of the GED exam — the first since 2002 — the high school equivalency program has seen a sharp drop in the number of people who took and passed the test, according to local and state educators and the organization that runs it. In addition, at least 16 states have begun offering or plan to offer new, alternative tests.

Combined, these changes represent a dramatic shift in the equivalency landscape dominated by the GED since its inception during World War II.

Read more
NPR Ed
2:25 am
Fri January 9, 2015

Obama In Tennessee To Promote Free Community College

President Obama speaks at a Ford assembly plant on Wednesday in Wayne, Mich., about the resurgent automotive and manufacturing sector.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Fri January 9, 2015 6:15 pm

President Obama is in Tennessee previewing some of the big issues he'll talk about in his State of the Union address later this month. Friday, he'll speak in Knoxville, focusing on education and an idea that is gathering steam in some states: making community college tuition-free.

In the emerging debate over this idea, there are skeptics and there are true believers.

Read more
Illinois Issues - Education Desk
4:00 pm
Wed January 7, 2015

U of I Considers Sexual Assault Policies

Credit http://oiir.illinois.edu

University of Illinois officials say they will continue to convene meetings on the prevention of sexual assault on all three campuses. The group comprises about 20 people - including legal counsel, police, and women's rights advocates.

Dedra Williams is the Assistant VP for Academic Affairs at the University of Illinois, she says the goal is to ultimately shape effective policies: "If we need to make improvements, we want to be a leader and work with the legislators, with our campuses, and make a safe place for our students."

Read more
Secret Lives Of Teachers
12:33 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

In Class It's 'Ms. Smalls,' Onstage She's 'Miss Houston'

Smalls shown competing in the Miss Texas pageant.
Courtesy of BluDoor Studios

The NPR Ed team is discovering what teachers do when they're not teaching. Artist? Carpenter? Quidditch player? Explore our Secret Lives of Teachers series.

It wasn't until Isis Smalls arrived on campus wearing a rhinestone-encrusted tiara and a sash emblazoned with "Miss Houston" that her students discovered she was a newly crowned, bona fide beauty queen.

Read more
Education Desk
6:27 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Full Time Police To Return To Springfield High Schools

The Springfield School Board has approved the full-time staffing of police officers at the city's three public high schools.  

Board members voted unanimously Monday. It will cost more than $115,000 to provide policing at the schools throughout the rest of the school year.  

Superintendent Jennifer Gill tells The State Journal-Register that the city is helping the school district with the cost. She says the officers will likely start working full time next week.  

Read more
NPR Ed
6:03 am
Tue January 6, 2015

What Schools Could Use Instead Of Standardized Tests

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 3:26 pm

Close your eyes for a minute and daydream about a world without bubble tests.

Education Week recently reported that some Republican Senate aides are doing more than dreaming — they're drafting a bill that would eliminate the federal mandate on standardized testing.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:45 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Student Tuition Now Outweighs State Funding At Public Colleges

During the fiscal years 2003-2012, "median tuition rose 55 percent across all public colleges," while state funding decreased by 12 percent, the General Accountability Office reports.
Imeh Akpanudosen Getty Images

Driven by higher tuition fees and tighter state funds, America's public colleges now get more money from their students than from all state sources. That's according to a report by the Government Accountability Office, which says tuition revenue reached 25 percent of the colleges' total in 2012.

The numbers are stark, with the GAO saying that from fiscal years 2003-2012, "state funding decreased by 12 percent overall while median tuition rose 55 percent across all public colleges."

Read more
Higher Ed
4:57 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

U Of I Suggests Keeping Tuition Flat

The University of Illinois Springfield campus
Credit UIS.edu

Incoming freshmen from Illinois would see no increase in base tuition at the University of Illinois next fall under a proposal announced by the school's leadership.
 
It will go to the full board on Jan. 15 at a meeting in Chicago.
 
The proposal calls for in-state tuition that matches rates for the current
school year. That's $12,036 a year in Urbana-Champaign, $10,584 in Chicago and
$9,405 in Springfield.
 
University officials say holding the line on tuition will help middle-class

Read more
NPR Ed
4:17 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

From Foster Care To Freshman Year

When Jasmine Uqdah aged out of the foster care system in 2008, she didn't have a job, a checking account or a car. She did have a college acceptance letter — but no money to pay for schooling.
Joshua Lott for NPR

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 8:39 am

By the time she aged out of foster care, Jasmine Uqdah had spent nearly half her life in the system. On a summer day in 2008, Uqdah grabbed her duffel bag and two small garbage bags, and she stuffed everything she owned inside.

It wasn't much — just some clothes and a few stuffed animals. She said her goodbyes to her foster family in Detroit and moved out. She was 18 years old.

Read more
NPR Ed
4:06 pm
Sun January 4, 2015

'Military Children': Coping With The Loss Of A Parent

Military Children from WAMU's Breaking Ground project sheds light on the challenges of being the child of soldiers.
Kavitha Cardoza/WAMU

Originally published on Sun January 4, 2015 7:55 pm

As part of our series this week on the education of military children, Kavitha Cardoza of member station WAMU visits a special camp that helps these children cope.

Read more
NPR Ed
8:03 am
Sat January 3, 2015

Six Education Stories To Watch in 2015

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Sat January 3, 2015 1:39 pm

As the senior member of the NPR Ed team with 25 years on the education beat, here are the top stories that my expert sources and I believe will be ones to watch in 2015. For more predictions, check out our crowdsourced list.

Read more
NPR Ed
4:34 am
Sat January 3, 2015

Kindergarten Entry Tests And More Education Predictions for 2015

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Sat January 3, 2015 1:40 pm

In 2014 we've covered education as the world-changing story it is and you've been along for the ride. And so at year's end, NPR Ed reached far and wide to bring you a set of provocative predictions for the education world in 2015:

Read more
Education Desk
5:55 am
Fri January 2, 2015

Illinois School Construction Will Require Storm Shelters

Credit flickr/Frank Juarez

Illinois now requires new school construction to include storm shelters.

You can't predict when or where a tornado will strike, but supporters of the new law say schools should be more prepared. 

The law orders districts that take on new construction or remodeling to include a safe place for students to go in the event of a severe storm.  Not everyone agreed with the change.  

Read more
Education
3:38 pm
Thu January 1, 2015

Military's Preschool Program Considered A National Model

Originally published on Thu January 1, 2015 9:34 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Read more
Education
3:38 pm
Thu January 1, 2015

Four UNC-Chapel Hill Employees Out In Wake Of Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Thu January 1, 2015 9:34 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Read more
Education
4:15 am
Thu January 1, 2015

Peripatetic Students Thrive At Department Of Defense Schools

Originally published on Thu January 1, 2015 6:48 am

Copyright 2015 WAMU-FM. To see more, visit http://wamu.org.

Book News & Features
2:31 am
Wed December 31, 2014

Vocab Tech For Toddlers Encourages 'Anytime, Anywhere Learning'

The Sesame Workshop app called Big Bird's Words helps children not only learn new vocabulary, but also understand the interconnectedness between words.
Sesame Workshop

Originally published on Wed December 31, 2014 10:54 am

When the children's television show Sesame Street first hit the air in 1969, many were deeply skeptical that you could use TV to introduce very young children to the basics of reading and math. But the experiment proved to be a remarkable success; Sesame Street has reached several generations of toddlers with its combination of educational content and pure entertainment. And now, Sesame Workshop is using new technology to reach the next generation.

Read more
NPR Ed
2:27 am
Wed December 31, 2014

Why Emotional Learning May Be As Important As The ABCs

Thomas O'Donnell reads about Twiggle the Turtle to his kindergartners at Matthew Henson Elementary School in Baltimore.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Wed December 31, 2014 10:03 am

Thomas O'Donnell's kindergarten kids are all hopped up to read about Twiggle the anthropomorphic Turtle.

"Who can tell me why Twiggle here is sad," O'Donnell asks his class at Matthew Henson Elementary School in Baltimore.

"Because he doesn't have no friends," a student pipes up.

And how do people look when they're sad?

"They look down!" the whole class screams out.

Yeah, Twiggle is lonely. But, eventually, he befriends a hedgehog, a duck and a dog. And along the way, he learns how to play, help and share.

Read more
NPR Ed
3:49 pm
Tue December 30, 2014

Common Core Repeal, The Day After

Hugo High School, like many public schools in Oklahoma, was a battleground in the fight over Common Core.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:32 pm

What do the Common Core State Standards have in common with congressional Democrats and the Chicago Cubs?

They all had a really rough year.

Of the 45 states that first adopted the academic standards, many spent 2014 talking about repeal. In Oklahoma (as well as Indiana and South Carolina), it wasn't just talk. The Legislature voted to drop the Core in May. And Gov. Mary Fallin, a longtime champion of the Common Core, signed the repeal in June.

Read more
Education
7:44 am
Tue December 30, 2014

Should Parental Connections Provide A Leg Up In College Admissions?

Edward Blum, director of the Project on Fair Representation, announced at a Nov. 17 news conference the filing of two lawsuits challenging admissions policies at Harvard and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Imagine a democracy where the children of former public officials had a leg up for winning an elected office themselves — a 10,000-vote head start, perhaps, or a seat on the county council reserved especially for them.

Most Americans rightly would scoff at a system that so brazenly allocated rewards based on who your parents are. And yet most American colleges and universities do just that.

Read more
Secret Lives Of Teachers
6:03 am
Tue December 30, 2014

Shaping Wood, Understanding Sound And An Eye For Style

Mike Lindstrom checks the profile of a guitar he's building in his basement workshop.
Courtesy of Mike Lindstrom

Originally published on Tue December 30, 2014 6:26 pm

The NPR Ed team is discovering what teachers do when they're not teaching. Artist? Carpenter? Quidditch player? Explore our Secret Lives of Teachers series.

Name: Mike Lindstrom

School: Kyffin Elementary School

City, State: Golden, Colo.

Subject: General Ed

Grade: 3

Tell us about your secret life.

Read more
Goats and Soda
2:56 am
Tue December 30, 2014

A 'Lost Boy' Helps The Girls Of South Sudan Find An Education

Daniel Majook Gai from South Sudan goes in and out of his war-torn country to help children there go to school.
Courtesy of Project Education South Sudan

Originally published on Tue December 30, 2014 11:17 am

As a boy, Daniel Majook Gai fled the civil war in Sudan, running miles by himself to safety and leaving his family behind. He was one of the so-called Lost Boys — a name given to children separated from their families during that conflict.

After years in refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia, Gai landed in the United States, reunited with his family and got an education. In 2011, he returned home to the newly independent country of South Sudan.

But war came back in 2013 and split the new nation.

Read more
NPR Ed
2:13 pm
Mon December 29, 2014

The Man Behind Common Core Math

Jason Zimba, one of the writers of the Common Core, waits while his daughters play.
Julienne Schaer for The Hechinger Report

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 12:29 pm

Every Saturday morning at 10 a.m., Jason Zimba begins a math tutoring session for his two young daughters with the same ritual. Claire, 4, draws on a worksheet while Abigail, 7, pulls addition problems written on strips of paper out of an old Kleenex box decorated like a piggy bank.

If she gets the answer "lickety-split," as her dad says, she can check it off. If she doesn't, the problem goes back in the box, to try the following week.

Read more
Illinois Issues - Education Desk
12:14 pm
Mon December 29, 2014

UI Chancellor Responds To Salaita Report

Phyllis Wise, chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Credit news.illinois.edu

Here is Chancellor Phyllis Wise's full statement in response to the report of the Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure's analysis of the university's handling of Steven Salaita's dismissal:

Read more

Pages