Education Desk

Business
3:59 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

California Public Pension Fund Shifts To Clean Energy

Originally published on Tue September 23, 2014 4:20 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Higher Ed
4:47 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Support Of Salaita Continues At U Of I

Credit WILL

Supporters of a would-be University of Illinois professor say they're not going to stop protesting a week and a half after the Board of Trustees voted to not hire Steven Salaita. A few dozen of the professor's allies on campus showed up to rally and speak at an Academic Senate meeting Monday.

Fourteen academic departments – all within the humanities – at the U of I's Urbana campus have reaffirmed their votes of no confidence in the campus' chancellor, Phyllis Wise, after she took back Salaita's faculty appointment in August.

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Education Desk
5:42 am
Mon September 22, 2014

More Campuses "Ready To Respond"

Richland Community College
Credit Richland.edu

College students are back on campus and classes are underway. Parents at some Illinois schools have extra assurance their kids will be safe when they're at school.

Universities and colleges are often ranked, making "best of" lists for one program or the other. 

But only a couple in Illinois have achieved the designation of becoming a "Ready to Respond" campus -- a title given by the Illinois Emergency Management Agency after the school has met criteria, like developing a violence prevention plan and going through training exercises. 

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The Two-Way
10:53 am
Sat September 20, 2014

Calif. School District Will Get Rid Of Controversial Armored Vehicle

The San Diego School District is sending back a military vehicle it had planned to use in rescue operations. The district had released renderings of what the MRAP might look like after its tan military color is repainted. This version shows it as a police vehicle.
San Diego Unified School District

Originally published on Sat September 20, 2014 1:17 pm

Yielding to residents' concerns, the San Diego Unified School District says it's returning the 18-ton MRAP, or mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle, that its police department recently acquired from the Department of Defense's surplus equipment program.

San Diego officials had said the MRAP would be used only as a rescue vehicle in extreme circumstances — but that didn't satisfy the plan's critics, particularly in a summer marked by controversy over police using military-grade equipment to face off with demonstrators in Ferguson, Mo.

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Education
6:36 am
Sat September 20, 2014

Harmony Project Offers More Than Just Music In LA

Originally published on Sat September 20, 2014 1:05 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

White House Announces Campaign Against Campus Sexual Assault

President Obama and Vice President Biden on Friday debuted the "It's On Us" campaign to help colleges and universities prevent and respond to sexual assault on campus.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 1:29 pm

President Obama unveiled a new White House campaign aimed at combating campus sexual assault, saying such violence is "an affront to our basic humanity."

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Higher Ed
11:47 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Kennedy Defends University's Job Denial

Chris Kennedy
Credit bot.uillinois.edu

University of Illinois Board of Trustees Chairman Chris Kennedy said in a newspaper interview published Friday that the university was right to deny a faculty job to a professor whose anti-Israel Twitter messages were considered by some to be anti-Semitic.  

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
10:17 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Debate: Should Schools Embrace The Common Core?

Education experts faced off on the motion "Embrace the Common Core" at an Intelligence Squared U.S. debate, moderated by John Donvan (center).
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 1:10 pm

More than 40 states have adopted the Common Core State Standards, new national academic benchmarks in reading and math. But the Common Core has become the center of a highly contentious debate nationwide.

Proponents say the Common Core was designed to ensure that children, no matter where they go to school, are prepared to succeed in college or the workplace upon graduation. Opponents argue that many of the standards are not age- or development-appropriate, and that they constrain the ability of teachers to adjust their teaching to their individual classrooms.

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NPR Ed
8:14 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Q&A: A View Of The Common Core From The Principal's Office

Wellesenterprises/iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed September 24, 2014 4:26 pm

Suburban school principals aren't exactly known as rabble-rousers. In general, they're a pretty sedate bunch — you know, composed, serious, calm.

But if you want to get them riled up, ask them what they think about the Common Core State Standards and how teachers are evaluated.

That's exactly what I did recently: During a visit to Washington, D.C., I sat down with a group of middle and high school principals — members of the National Association of Secondary School Principals — to hear their frontline views of the Common Core.

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Higher Ed
6:29 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Legal Expert Says Salaita Could Win Suit Against U Of I

Steven Salaita spoke in Urbana earlier this month.
Credit Jim Meadows

Clarification: Katherine Franke also serves on the Board of Directors of the Center for Constitutional Rights, one of the organizations representing Steven Salaita.

A prominent law professor who's boycotting the University of Illinois after Steven Salaita’s job offer was withdrawn says Salaita would easily win a legal case against the University.  Columbia professor Katherine Franke says Salaita's first amendment rights were violated by the U of I's Board of Trustees.

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WUIS Illinois Issues Forum
11:43 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Tell Us About Education on Sat. Sep. 27

Credit Dan LoGrasso / WUIS

REGISTER TO ATTEND

Residents are encouraged to share what they see as the top education issues affecting Illinois at the next WUIS/Illinois Issues Forum on Education September 27, 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.  The forum will be in the WUIS Suggs Performance Studio on the UIS campus. 

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NPR Ed
6:47 am
Thu September 18, 2014

How To Make The Most Of Your 10 Minutes With Teacher

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 8:11 am

So you finally get the chance to meet one on one with your child's teacher — now what?

Like a good Boy Scout, be prepared: Educators agree that doing your homework before a parent-teacher conference can make a big difference.

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NPR Ed
6:47 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Rethinking A Fall Classic: The Parent-Teacher Conference

New York City Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina speaks with students Carlos Cruz and Lluvia Hernandez while visiting a school in Brooklyn earlier this year.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 7:48 am

So now that students have settled in to the routine of the school year, yet another fall education ritual looms: the parent-teacher conference.

And while there's universal agreement that parent involvement is a good thing, these all-too-short meetings are often frustrating on both sides.

Teachers, and parents, often find them too short and too shallow, too likely to focus on problems, with little time to really get beyond test scores and a few bullet points about the curriculum or homework. And, as children get older, fewer parents tend to show up.

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NPR Ed
8:14 am
Wed September 17, 2014

These People Can Make Student Loans Disappear

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 11:54 am

It was an ordinary Friday. Courtney Brown, 24, of Kalamazoo, Mich., was busy looking for a job. "I've applied all kinds of places," she says. "Wal-Mart, Target, Verizon Wireless."

Then she got a strange letter in the mail. " 'We are writing you with good news,' " she reads to me over the phone. " 'We got rid of some of your Everest College debt. ... No one should be forced to mortgage their future for an education.' "

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NPR Ed
6:48 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

The NPR Ed Mailbag: Alternative Teacher Certification

LA Johnson/NPR

Last week I reported about Indiana's newest teaching license. Called a "career specialist" license, it allows anyone with a B.A., a B average, and three years of related work experience to become a middle or high school teacher just by passing a content test.

Overall, 1 in 5 teachers now enters the profession through nontraditional means — meaning other than by studying education in a four-year or master's program.

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NPR Ed
1:29 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

'A' Is For Apps: Teachers Share Top Digital Tools Of The Trade

Teachers are incorporating mobile technology and a digital sensibility into classroom lessons with assignments such as this one: to caption a historical photograph for teacher Nicholas Ferroni's high school history class in Union, N.J.
Courtesy of Nicholas Ferroni

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 8:06 am

Nestled between Julia Auster's fantasy football app and Facebook Messenger is a relatively new bucket of apps: the education tools she uses in the French classes she teaches at Robert Adams Middle School in Holliston, Mass.

Auster isn't alone.

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Education Desk
12:03 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Carbon Monoxide Leak Sends North Mac Students To Hospital

NOTE: This story has been updated.  More than 130 students and a few staff members from North Mac Intermediate School in Girard have been taken to hospitals with symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. North Mac superintendent Marica Cullen said a leaky pipe caused significantly high carbon monoxide levels, and the school - with about 640 students, was evacuated around 9 am she said.

Cullen says the number of affected students may continue to rise, as parents are being told to take their children directly to the hospital if they show any signs of being sick.

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Education Desk
7:25 am
Mon September 15, 2014

100 Groups Join Together To Push For Illinois Education Revamp

Credit flickr/LizMarie_AK

Nearly 100 organizations are joining together to push
Illinois lawmakers to pass a school funding reform proposal in the spring.
 
 Funding Illinois' Future members include community foundations, civil rights organizations, school officials, and business and education reform groups statewide. All support the passage of a school funding proposal sponsored by Democratic state Sen. Andy Manar of Bunker Hill.
 
 The legislation would overhaul Illinois' dated school funding formula, first put in place in 1997. While there's wide agreement that the state's funding

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NPR Ed
10:09 pm
Sun September 14, 2014

Q&A: Why Teaching Music Matters

Margaret Martin (right) poses with student Jose Correa during a Harmony Project open house at the Ramon C. Cortines School for Visual and Performing Arts in Los Angeles.
Esteban Rael Harmony Project

Originally published on Sat September 20, 2014 1:07 pm

I went to Los Angeles to report a story on brain science. A new study had just been released, exploring how music instruction helps kids process language. The children the researchers studied were all participants in a community music program run by the nonprofit Harmony Project.

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The Two-Way
3:36 pm
Sat September 13, 2014

San Diego School District's New 18-Ton Armored Vehicle Creates Stir

The school district has released two renderings of what the MRAP might look like after its tan military color is painted over. In one version, it's police blue; another depicts it as more of an ambulance, white with a red cross.
San Diego Unified School District

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 10:40 am

News that San Diego Unified School District has acquired an MRAP, or mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle, is adding a new facet to discussions about the practice of giving surplus military equipment to civilian agencies.

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Education
6:40 am
Sat September 13, 2014

International Students Save N.Carolina Academy From Shutdown

Originally published on Sat September 13, 2014 11:47 am

Copyright 2014 WUNC-FM. To see more, visit http://wunc.org.

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

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Education Desk
4:17 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Unloaded Gun Found At Southeast High

Credit District 186

An unloaded gun was discovered at Southeast High School today.   District officials say the gun was not found on a person, but suspects have been detained.   An investigation is continuing.  

The district also says the discovery came after a tip was given to the school.  That prompted what's known as a soft lock down as a precaution.  

Increased security is planned for tonight.  Southeast hosts Chatham Glenwood in a football game this evening.
   
It was just over two weeks ago that a Lanphier student was arrested for bringing a loaded gun to school.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Fri September 12, 2014

For Teachers, Many Paths Into The Classroom ... Some Say Too Many

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 12:16 pm

Hey, you there. You have a college degree? How'd you like to be a teacher?

Indiana has just approved a license that clears a new pathway to the teaching profession. It allows anyone with a bachelor's degree, a B average and approximately three years of related work experience to become a middle or high school teacher in a subject such as math, science or music, provided they pass a content test.

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Higher Ed
6:58 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Trustees Adopt Slightly Higher Budget For U of I

Credit UIS.EDU

University of Illinois trustees on Thursday approved a $5.64 billion budget for the current fiscal year. That's an increase of $11.1 million, or .2 percent.  

University President Robert Easter said the small increase reflects in part of the university's hope that it can keep students costs from rising too rapidly. A year on campus at the flagship campus in Urbana-Champaign costs a student more than $20,000.  

The vote by the Board of Trustees approving the new spending plan was unanimous and made without comment.  

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StoryCorps
2:35 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Giving Every Kid Equal Standing In The School Lunch Line

Students Dakota Gibson (left) and Gary Barber with school volunteer Kenny Thompson after their StoryCorps interview in Houston, Texas.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 12:03 pm

Until recently, some students in the Spring Branch Independent School District in the Houston area dreaded lunchtime. The cafeteria meant humiliation, because their parents couldn't afford a hot lunch.

The alternative for these kids was a cold cheese sandwich; anyone seen leaving the lunch line with one was marked as being poor.

Until school volunteer Kenny Thompson saw it happen.

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Higher Ed
4:40 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

U Of I Trustees Reject Salaita Hire

Steven Salaita spoke earlier this week in Urbana.
Credit Jim Meadows

University of Illinois trustees on Thursday voted not to hire a professor whose anti-Israel Twitter messages were deemed anti-Semitic by some, raising the likelihood of a lawsuit and further campus protests.  

Steven Salaita, who last year accepted a job to begin teaching this fall in the university's Native American Studies Program, has threatened legal action if the university rescinded the offer. His attorneys have said if he isn't hired, they'll go to court to try to get an injunction to force the university to hire him.  

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Playgrounds For All Children: Here's How To Find One

John W. Poole/NPR

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 12:11 pm

Janna Espinoza's daughter Coraline has hearing loss, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and developmental delays. Nearly 2 years old, she can't sit up, stand, creep or use her hands as a typically developing child does.

Coraline is among an estimated 6.4 million children in the U.S. with a disability. And for these kids the simple ritual of playing outside can get very complicated.

"My daughter can't do very much at a typical playground, except watch her older sister play," says Espinoza. "Playgrounds are a depressing place for us."

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NPR Ed
3:50 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

This Is Your Brain. This Is Your Brain On Music

Amir Pinkney-Jengkens, 8, is learning trombone through Harmony Project, a nonprofit that provides musical instruments and instruction to children in low-income communities. Recent research suggests that such musical education may help improve kids' ability to process speech.
Annie Tritt for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 10:55 am

Musical training doesn't just improve your ear for music — it also helps your ear for speech. That's the takeaway from an unusual new study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that kids who took music lessons for two years didn't just get better at playing the trombone or violin; they found that playing music also helped kids' brains process language.

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Research News
4:10 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Built In Better Times, University Labs Now Lack Research Funding

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 7:01 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Higher Ed
2:43 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

UIS Enrollment Hits All-Time High

Credit UIS.edu

Enrollment at the University of Illinois Springfield has surpassed 5,400 for the first time in the school's history.  300 more students are on campus this fall compared to a year ago.

The fall census of students eclipsed the previous record set four years ago with 5,431 students enrolled.  It also marks the fifth consecutive year that enrollment has topped 5,000.

 The number of international students increased more than 115 percent, to 827 this fall.  

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