Education Desk

NPR Ed
11:57 am
Sat October 11, 2014

It's 2014. All Children Are Supposed To Be Proficient. What Happened?

President George W. Bush, seated, signs No Child Left Behind into law at Hamilton High School in Hamilton, Ohio.
Ron Edmonds ASSOCIATED PRESS

Take yourself back to those highly emotional, patriotic months after the 9/11 attacks.

In the midst of war, terrorism, fear and mourning, one bill passed 87-10 in the Senate and by a similar margin in the House — with equal support from both sides of the aisle. It was signed into law in January 2002 by George W. Bush, with the liberal lion of the Senate, Ted Kennedy, by his side.

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
5:09 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Springfield Faculty Takes Stand on Academic Freedom

Steven Salaita held a press conference at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign on Sept. 9.
Credit WILL

The University of Illinois Springfield Campus Senate today/Friday passed a measure aimed at protecting academic freedom.

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NPR Ed
3:38 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Digital Natives, Except When It Comes To Textbooks

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:13 pm

The spiral of destruction.

We're not talking about instability in the Middle East or Ebola.

We're talking textbooks.

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
3:57 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

UIS Faculty Tackles Resolution On Academic Freedom

Steven Salaita speaks at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the summer.
Credit WILL

On Friday, the Campus Senate of the University of Illinois at Springfield will take up a strongly-worded resolution written in the aftermath of the Board of Trustees' controversial dismissal of Steven Salaita. 

He's the professor whose job offer at the university's main campus was rescinded after his critical and sometimes profane tweets about the Israeli conflict with Gaza.

UIS Senate chair Jorge Villegas said the resolution is in response to the Board's position that tenure comes with a requirement of civility.

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NPR Ed
3:03 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Who Needs Algebra? New Approach To College Math Helps More Pass

Ashjame Pendarvis, a first-year community college student, works on her math homework at the University of District of Columbia.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:16 am

Let's start with a little word problem. Sixty percent of the nation's 12.8 million community college students are required to take at least one course in subject X. Eighty percent of that 60 percent never move on past that requirement.

  1. Let Y = the total percentage of community college students prevented from graduating simply by failing that one subject, X. What is Y?

    The answer: Y = 48.

  2. And if you haven't guessed it by now, What is X?

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Planet Money
2:58 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

How College Students Battled Textbook Publishers To A Draw, In 3 Graphs

Quoctrung Bui/NPR

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 12:18 pm

College textbooks are expensive. You probably already know this. A new biology or economics book can cost $300.

And prices have been soaring, doubling over the past decade, growing faster than the price of housing, cars, even health care.

But, surprisingly, the amount students actually spend on textbooks has not been rising. In fact, the best data we could find on this shows students have been spending a bit less over time.

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New Boom
3:20 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

A Silent Majority Of Undereducated And Underemployed Millennials

Fabianie Andre with her 3-year-old daughter, Leilah, at their home in suburban Boston. Andre is one of many millennials who lack a college education.
Asma Khalid WBUR

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 11:16 am

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

Millennials are often mocked as Starbucks baristas with Ivy League educations.

And while they are the best-educated generation to date, data from the Pew Research Center show about two-thirds of millennials between ages 25 and 32 lack a bachelor's degree.

That majority is often ignored in conversations about millennials.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Tue October 7, 2014

Competency-Based Education: No More Semesters?

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 12:32 pm

"I went to a four-year university." "That job requires a one-year certificate." "It's a two-semester course." "She's a fifth-year senior." What do these expressions have in common? They use time as the yardstick for higher education.

Essentially, this means measuring not how much you've learned, but how long you've spent trying to learn it.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Sat October 4, 2014

Q&A: Plumbing The Mysteries Of The Teenage Brain

Professor Laurence Steinberg, of Temple University, says adolescence should be conceived of as lasting from puberty to the early 20s.
Axel Griesch Fotografie Tel. 004 Laurence Steinberg

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 8:46 pm

Do you remember the summer when you first fell in love? The songs that were playing on the radio, butterflies in the stomach, the excitement of a stolen kiss? The tendency of our brains to especially hold onto memories from the teenage years is called the "reminiscence bump."

It's one of the many distinctive characteristics of the adolescent brain that psychologist Laurence Steinberg lays out in his new book, Age of Opportunity: Lessons from the New Science of Adolescence.

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Education
6:57 am
Sat October 4, 2014

Dancer Needed To Move To Think

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 12:50 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Dame Gillian Lynne is Broadway royalty. She choreographed "Cats," "Phantom Of The Opera." Today she's 88, still dancing and still happily married.

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TED Radio Hour
7:37 am
Fri October 3, 2014

How Do Schools Kill Creativity?

Ken Robinson proposes a more creative system of education.
Asa Mathat TED

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 10:31 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Source of Creativity

About Ken Robinson's TED Talk

Sir Ken Robinson makes a case for creating an education system that nurtures — rather than stifles — creativity.

About Ken Robinson

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Fri October 3, 2014

Take The NPR Ed Visitor Survey

Ah, the good old days.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 12:32 pm

It's been more than four months since we officially launched NPR Ed, and now it's your chance to tell us how we're doing.

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American Made: The New Manufacturing Landscape
6:06 am
Fri October 3, 2014

U.S. Manufacturing: A Remembrance And A Look Ahead

A worker cuts slabs of steel at a mill in Cleveland in 2004.
Ron Schwane AP

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 10:28 am

If it weren't for American manufacturing, I wouldn't be here today.

Literally.

A century ago, my grandfather moved from Poland to Youngstown, Ohio, to work in a steel mill. At the time, Ohio factories were cranking out steel slabs, tires and cars — building a mountain of wealth that the next generation could climb. And the generation after that.

But what will happen in the 21st century? Is the path that led to higher ground blocked now?

The answer is complicated.

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Around the Nation
5:29 am
Fri October 3, 2014

Michigan Football Apologizes For Letting QB With A Concussion Play

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 6:36 am

Copyright 2014 WDET-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wdet.org.

Education
4:05 am
Fri October 3, 2014

After Protests Over History Curriculum, School Board Tries To Compromise

Students line a busy intersection and overpass in the Denver suburb of Littleton, Colo., on Sept. 25, protesting a Jefferson County School Board proposal to emphasize patriotism and downplay civil unrest in the teaching of U.S. history.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 2:56 pm

Hundreds of Colorado high school students have walked out of class in the past two weeks to protest proposed changes to the Advanced Placement history curriculum.

The firestorm of protest was sparked by a resolution in August from Jefferson County school board member Julie Williams. When she heard that conservatives across the country were upset about the new AP history curriculum, she proposed a committee to review the district's courses.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu October 2, 2014

New Orleans Schools Face A Surge Of Unaccompanied Minors

Yashua Cantillano, 14, arrived in New Orleans in June from Tegucigalpa, Honduras. He's now enrolled in a charter school, Carver Prep, on the city's east side.
Mallory Falk/WWNO

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 7:17 pm

For 14-year-old Yashua Cantillano, life in New Orleans is an improvement.

But that's not saying much.

Just three months ago, Yashua was in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, dodging gang members. He says they would drive by his school, guns visible, threatening to kill him, his younger brother — Yashua's whole family.

"We'd hide all day," Yashua says, "and that kept us from going to school."

After crossing the U.S. border illegally, he came to New Orleans and ultimately enrolled at Carver Prep, a small charter school on the city's east side.

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Education Desk
4:01 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

LLCC Announces New Ag Programs

One state university and four Illinois community colleges are kicking off new agricultural and environmental programs. That includes Lincoln Land Community College in Springfield.

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Goats and Soda
2:52 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Take A New Test Aimed At The World's English-Language Learners

English-language students in China practice their blackboard skills.
China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 4:50 pm

It's tuff to master English. It's even tough for people born in America, who (or whom?) are often confused by too/to/two many konfusing things.

So you can only imagine how tough it is for non-English speakers trying to learn the tongue.

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Education
12:47 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

Instead Of Staring At Screens, These Kids Stared At Faces

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
4:06 am
Tue September 30, 2014

Kids And Screen Time: Cutting Through The Static

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 5:46 pm

The walls are lined with robots and movie posters for Star Wars and Back to the Future. But this is no 1980s nerd den. It's the technology lab at Westside Neighborhood School in Los Angeles, and the domain of its ed-tech coordinator, Don Fitz-Roy.

"So we're gonna be talking about digital citizenship today."

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Education Desk
4:57 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Manar Gears Up For Fight Over School Funding Change

Sen. Andy Manar (D-Bunker Hill)
Credit ilga.gov

State lawmakers returning to the capitol for the fall veto session could discuss a change in the state's school funding formula.   But it won't happen without a fight. 

State Senator Andy Manar, a Democrat from Bunker Hill in Macoupin County, has been pushing for approval of a plan that would provide additional aid to districts with a higher number of students in poverty.

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Education
3:14 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Calif. Law Requires 'Affirmative Consent' To Combat Sexual Assault

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 5:30 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Mon September 29, 2014

California Enacts 'Yes Means Yes' Law, Defining Sexual Consent

California has become the first U.S. state to define when "yes means yes" in sexual assault cases on college campuses, after a bill sponsored by state Sen. Kevin de Leon was signed into law Sunday.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 6:29 pm

Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a bill into law that makes California the first in the nation to have a clear definition of when people agree to sex. The law goes further than the common "no means no" standard, which has been blamed for bringing ambiguity into investigations of sexual assault cases.

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NPR Story
3:48 am
Mon September 29, 2014

Trial To Begin In Atlanta Public Schools' Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 12:42 pm

Copyright 2014 WABE-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wabe.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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A Closer Look At Sexual Assaults On Campus
2:27 am
Mon September 29, 2014

HBCUs Move To Address Campus Sexual Assaults, But Is It Enough?

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 6:17 am

When it comes to studying sexual violence, college surveys often don't include students at historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs. But one major study found sexual assaults are lower on those campuses than others.

Some question those numbers and whether HBCUs have the resolve to openly address the issue of campus rape.

Of the 100 HBCUs in the country, Morgan State University in Baltimore ranks in the top 15 for academics.

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NPR Ed
7:28 pm
Sat September 27, 2014

Right And Left Joined Forces In Fight To Legalize Home Schooling

Home-schooling might still be seen as a fringe movement, but today, it's equally outlandish to suggest that home-schooling should be illegal. A few decades ago, that wasn't the case.
MoMo Productions Getty Images/Ozy

Originally published on Sat September 27, 2014 8:15 pm

"It was like the days of the one-room schoolhouse," reminisces home-schooling advocate and First Amendment lawyer Michael Farris. He's talking about a few short decades ago, the time when he and his wife raised their 10 children — six girls, four boys — and educated them entirely in the home.

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Education
8:09 am
Sat September 27, 2014

Maryland School Shreds The Old Rules Of Applying To College

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 7:49 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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NPR Ed
8:45 am
Fri September 26, 2014

Student Course Evaluations Get An 'F'

You're next.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 2:20 pm

At Denny's, diners are asked to fill out comment cards. How was your meal? Were you satisfied with the quality of service? Were the restrooms clean?

In universities around the world, semesters end with students filling out similar surveys about their experience in the class and the quality of the teacher.

Student ratings are high-stakes. They come up when faculty are being considered for tenure or promotions. In fact, they're often the only method a university uses to monitor the quality of teaching.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu September 25, 2014

Q&A: The Mis-Education Of African-American Girls

Vectorarts/iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu September 25, 2014 8:39 am

We've known for a long time that inequality and systemic educational barriers are holding back many young African-Americans. President Obama has led an initiative to help close the opportunity gap for young black men.

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Education Desk
6:53 am
Thu September 25, 2014

Missed Any Of Our Education Specials? Find Them Here

Credit Stephen Smith

The Science Of Smart

Schools across the country are trying new ways to teach based on brain science. Teachers say current techniques are failing, but new approaches can help students learn more deeply.  

Until recently, we didn't know much about the best ways to learn. Now that's changing. Over recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.

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