Education Desk

NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu February 5, 2015

These Are A Few Of Our Favorite Teachers

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 10:59 am

You probably have that one teacher who stands out — who pushed you, or loved you or just taught you a heck of a lot. We do.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
11:34 am
Wed February 4, 2015

Cooking 101: Stanford Adds Healthful Eating Skills To The Curriculum

Chef David Iott explains the perfect way to prepare risotto to Stanford students.
Courtesy of Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 3:13 pm

College is in many ways a time to learn life skills. But students often get so bogged down building up their resumes and studying for that Rocket Science 101 midterm that they've got no time left for the basics — like cooking.

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NPR Ed
10:42 am
Wed February 4, 2015

Pre-K Pays Off By Lowering Special Ed Placements

A new study finds that students who attend state-funded pre-K are less likely to need special education programs later on in school.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 3:26 pm

Attending state-funded prekindergarten substantially reduces the likelihood that students will end up in special education programs later on, according to a new study by researchers at Duke University.

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
9:13 am
Wed February 4, 2015

Revised Version Of School Funding Formula Seeks $500 Million

Sen. Andy Manar (D-Macoupin Co.) introduces a revised version of his legislation that would reformulate state funds for public schools.
Credit Dusty Rhodes

 

Senator Andy Manar has reintroduced a measure proposing to change the way schools are funded in Illinois. This time, it has new formulas, and a request for more money. 

Like the version debated last session, which passed the Senate but stalled in the House, this formula would give more money to districts with low property values and high rates of poverty. At a press conference on Tuesday, Representative Sue Scherer, a Democrat  from Decatur and a former teacher, talked about the inequity from personal experience.

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Education
5:05 am
Wed February 4, 2015

Students At Corinthian Colleges Will Have Loans Forgiven

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 6:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Code Switch
4:07 pm
Tue February 3, 2015

Lots Of Confusion Over Teacher Firings At Howard University Middle School

Students protest outside Howard University Middle School of Mathematics and Science.
Victoria M. Walker Howard University

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 12:41 pm

Updated on Feb. 4 at 12:30 p.m. ET: The board of directors for the Howard University Middle School of Mathematics and Science issued a statement on the dismissal of three social studies teachers, indicating that the school is governed by an independent nonprofit organization and regulated by the D.C. Charter School Board. Its also confirms that three teachers resigned from the university effective Jan. 27. From the statement:

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
11:47 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Springfield School Board Examines Amended Budget

 

 

The Springfield school board took a close look at its budget Monday night, and discovered that it’s either $3 million in the black, or $3 million in the red.

 

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Tue February 3, 2015

From The Classroom To The Campaign Trail

Susan Sadlowski Garza, a counselor at Jane Addams Elementary, and a supporter canvass the South Side of Chicago. Garza is running for Chicago's City Council.
Becky Vevea WBEZ

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 2:59 pm

It's a frigid, 9-degree day, and Susan Sadlowski Garza is trudging through fresh snow in Chicago's 10th Ward.

"Hi, good morning. How are you? My name is Sue Sadlowski Garza. I'm running for alderman," she says to a woman who has just cracked open her front door.

Garza is the only counselor at Jane Addams Elementary, a school of about 850 students on the far South Side of Chicago. And she's one of five Chicago teachers running for City Council.

The others are Ed Hershey (25th), Tim Meegan (33rd), Tara Stamps (37th) and Dianne Daleiden (40th).

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New Boom
5:19 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

Economists Say Millennials Should Consider Careers In Trades

Jeffy Docteur is one of the students in the NStar electrician apprenticeship program outside Boston. He says he's interested in working on switching systems that keep power flowing through the electrical grid.
Chris Arnold NPR

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 10:39 am

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

As the economy continues to recover, economists are seeing stark differences between people with high school and college degrees. The unemployment rate is nearly twice as high for Americans with a high school diploma as for those with a four-year college degree or more.

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All Tech Considered
4:19 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

For Some Schools, Learning Doesn't Stop On Snow Days

Even when the weather turns nasty, some students are expected to log on to their classes from home.
Magictorch Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 10:39 am

Even when schools are closed for snow, students in Delphi, Ind., are expected to log on to their classes from home.

The seniors in Brian Tonsoni's economics class at Delphi Community High School are no strangers to technology — everybody has an Internet-connected laptop or smartphone in front of them in class as they work on business plans.

"We made a company, and so we are selling scarves," says Hannah Napier.

Team member Abby Price says their group has come up with a slogan as edgy as her high-tech classroom: "Don't be an ascot, get a scarf."

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Education
3:19 pm
Mon February 2, 2015

White House May Close Loophole That Sends Billions To For-Profit Schools

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 5:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
11:08 am
Mon February 2, 2015

Virtual Schools Bring Real Concerns About Quality

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 5:30 pm

At the end of Angela Kohtala's leadership skills course, her high school students have to plan and carry out a community service project. Maybe it's fixing up their school courtyard, or tutoring younger students in an afterschool program.

Afterwards, they create a PowerPoint with pictures of the project. This isn't just a nice way to develop presentation skills — it's mandatory to prove that they really weeded that garden or sat with those kids in the first place.

You see, Kohtala's students are spread across the state of Florida, while she herself lives in Maine.

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Education
4:05 pm
Sun February 1, 2015

University Endowments Reached Record Levels In 2014

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 12:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The annual ranking of college fundraising is out, and it's a shocker. The Council for Aid to Education found a massive upswing in money going to big universities last year. Stacy Palmer writes for the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

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Education
4:52 am
Sun February 1, 2015

A Crossroads At The End Of College: Introducing 'The Howard Project'

Howard University students (left to right) Kevin Peterman, Taylor Davis, Leighton Watson and Ariel Alford are the subjects of NPR's Project Howard. They'll be keeping audio diaries as they finish their final semester of college and look toward their futures.
Robb Hill for NPR

Originally published on Sat February 21, 2015 6:35 pm

If you know any college seniors, now might be a good time to send them some encouraging words. The class of 2015 can't be blamed if they're feeling a little worried: They're facing one of the most important transitions of their lives.

In a matter of months, they're about to launch from the relatively protected confines of college into the so-called "real world," where they have to find a sense of purpose — not to mention a paycheck. It's not hyperbole to say the decisions they make now will shape the rest of their lives.

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The Salt
4:44 am
Sun February 1, 2015

College Life Doesn't Have To Mean Crummy Cuisine, Says Dorm Room Chef

No oven necessary: Hu makes her pumpkin cake in the microwave.
Courtesy of Emily Hu

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 11:22 am

Emily Hu is a veritable master chef of the dorm room.

No oven? No problem. The college student is skilled at navigating the cooking limitations of campus living — she can whip up cakes with just four ingredients and a microwave, and make muffins in a toaster oven.

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
12:00 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Volunteers Work To Teach 3-D Printing Skills To Youth In Detention

A group of volunteers are working to bring a skill to youth in the juvenile justice system that could give them an edge in the workforce.

Tinkerers and the technologically savvy have been using 3-D printing for years to make models, parts and just about anything. The printers rapidly manufacture items from a set of instructions. They typically render in plastic, but they can make things out of metal and other materials, too.

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Education
10:16 am
Sat January 31, 2015

Party Ban Is Patronizing, U.Va. Sorority Women Say

University of Virginia students walk to fraternities at the start of rush week. Sorority women are always invited to Boys' Bid Night, but this year national sororities have ordered women to stay clear.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 5:00 pm

Saturday is Boys' Bid Night at the University of Virginia, when fraternities welcome their new members.

Women from U.Va.'s sororities are always invited to join the Boys' Bid Night party, but this year, they're under strict orders from national sorority presidents to stay clear of frat houses. The orders come after a Rolling Stone article about a gang rape at U.Va. that was later discredited.

But the women at U.Va.'s sororities are outraged, calling the ban unnecessary and patronizing.

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Goats and Soda
6:03 am
Sat January 31, 2015

Just Your Typical Teenagers Helping To Fight World Poverty

They're members of the global-minded teens club: (left to right) Toluwanimi Sola-Adeyemi of Lagos, Chloe McGill of Seattle and Emine Arcasoy of Chapel Hill.
Courtesy of Tolu Sola-Adeyemi, Chloe McGill and Emine Arcasoy.

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 7:24 am

On Jan. 15, 15-year-olds around the world took a stand. Their goal was to make the world a better place 15 years from now by getting rid of poverty and disease. They shared their worries and their dreams with leaders around the world as part of the newly launched "action/2015" effort, supported by the ONE Campaign, a nonprofit group that the rock star Bono founded.

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NPR Ed
6:08 am
Fri January 30, 2015

True Or False? Free And Reduced-Price Lunch = Poor

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri January 30, 2015 3:58 pm

In the education world, you see this phrase all the time: "free and reduced-price lunch." What's the percentage at a given school? In a given district or state?

It's not necessarily out of concern about who's getting fed. Instead, it's most often used to talk about concentrations of poverty and how that affects learning.

The phrase refers to students enrolled in the National School Lunch Program — an easily available data point for any school and any district.

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The Two-Way
5:34 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Dartmouth Bans Hard Liquor On Campus

Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon speaks Thursday to faculty and students about changes planned for the Ivy League school. Dartmouth banned hard liquor on campus and said all students will have to take part in a sexual violence prevention program all four years they are enrolled at the Ivy League school.
Jim Cole AP

Dartmouth College is banning hard liquor on campus and will introduce a mandatory four-year sexual violence prevention and education program for students. The steps are part of Dartmouth President Philip Hanlon's plans to reform social life at the Ivy League college.

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Education Desk
4:24 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Guzzardi Wants Parents To Be Able To Opt Kids Out Of Testing

Will Guzzardi
Credit ilga.gov

 

 

Parents and educators alike have been questioning the increasing number of standardized tests now required in public schools. A measure filed by Illinois State Representative Will Guzzardi would give moms and dads a way to allow their kid to skip these exams. 

 

“Seven other states have statutes allowing parents to opt out of their standardized testing,” Guzzardi says.  “Those states haven’t seen any sort of diminishment of their federal funding or anything like that, as some of the doom-and-gloom folks suggest might happen.”

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Code Switch
4:16 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

University Re-Imagines Town And Gown Relationship In Philadelphia

New apartment buildings are replacing empty lots in Mantua, one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods.
Will Figg for NPR

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 4:40 am

Dinner is served in the West Philadelphia neighborhood of Mantua.

"You look like you're ready to have a great Dornsife neighborhood partnership meal! Am I right about it?" Rose Samuel-Evans asks the crowd at a free community dinner of chicken marsala and stuffed flounder hosted by Drexel University.

Samuel-Evans works in this two-story, orange-brick schoolhouse; it's one of three refurbished buildings that opened last summer north of campus as part of Drexel's Dornsife Center for Neighborhood Partnerships.

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Goats and Soda
2:42 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Girls Get Good Grades But Still Need Help. As For Boys ... SOS!

Girl students in Bangkok tend to do better than boys. That's the finding of a new study.
Christophe Archambault AFP/Getty Images

A new study shows that when it comes to the classroom, girls rule.

They outperform boys in math, science and reading in 70 percent of the 70-plus countries and regions surveyed by the Organization for Economic Development Cooperation and Development. Girls do better even in countries that rank low on U.N.'s gender equality index and that tend to discriminate against women politically, economically and socially — like Qatar, Jordan and the United Arab Emirates.

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Education Desk
12:59 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Salaita Sues; University of Illinois Responds

Steven Salaita, the professor whose social media posts cost him a job at the University of Illinois, has filed suit in federal court against the university Board of Trustees, Chancellor Phyllis Wise, other university officials and "unknown donors."

University spokesman Tom Hardy released a statement saying the university will "vigorously defend against meritless claims" and citing several of the tweets that persuaded the Board of Trustees to reject, by a vote of 8-1, the appointment that he had been offered and accepted.

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The Two-Way
5:39 am
Thu January 29, 2015

Obama's Budget Would Undo Broad, Automatic Cuts Made In 2013

President Obama speaks to the media after the automatic budget cuts associated with the sequester took effect in March 2013.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 8:07 am

When President Obama meets with House Democrats tonight during their retreat in Philadelphia, officials say he'll lay out the details of his budget proposal, which will include reversal of large cuts to federal spending instituted in 2013.

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All Tech Considered
5:00 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

'Maker Space' Allows Kids To Innovate, Learn In The Hospital

Emily Neblett, a patient at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital in Nashville, Tenn., demonstrates circuit pieces from the mobile maker space that are connected by magnets.
Noah Nelson Youth Radio

Originally published on Tue February 3, 2015 10:04 am

All around the country, computer hackers, artists and other do-it-yourselfers are meeting up in "maker spaces," to share tools and build cool stuff together, such as robots or musical instruments. Maker spaces are popping up in all sorts of places: school auditoriums, libraries, under tents at community festivals, and now, even at the hospital.

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Education
3:29 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

At 100, Dartmouth Grad Still Writing His Class Notes

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 5:20 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Higher Education
6:56 am
Wed January 28, 2015

College Board To Vote Again On Buy-Out To Departing President

Trustees of the College of DuPage are expected to take another vote on a $762,000 buyout package for the school's president.  

The board of trustees last week voted 6-1 to accept the severance deal for President Robert Breuder. The deal will pay Breuder nearly three times his base salary when he retires in March 2016, three years before his current contract expires. He's been the college's president since January 2009.  

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NPR Story
4:14 am
Wed January 28, 2015

White House Won't Seek To End 529 College Tax Break

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 6:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Ed
3:34 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

Football As A Tool In The Hands Of A Master Craftsman

Coach Corey Parker talks with his players during football practice at River Rouge High.
Dustin Dwyer Michigan Radio

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 5:30 pm

Under the bright lights on a cold November Friday, the Panthers of River Rouge High are about to play for the district championship.

On the other side of the field, the visitors' stands are packed. The River Rouge side is pretty empty as the Panthers take the field.

The Panthers' head coach, Corey Parker, is used to this. He works it into his pregame speech.

"All we have is us!" he shouts, as his players bounce with nervous energy. "Fight for each other, love each other, let's go get it Rouge!"

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