Education Desk

NPR Ed
2:58 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

California Teacher Tenure Ruled Unconstitutional

Attorneys Theodore Boutrous Jr. (far right) and Marcellus McRae are joined by California public school students who won their case against the state.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:31 pm

A California judge today ruled the state's laws governing teacher tenure and the firing of public school teachers unconstitutional, saying they interfere with the state's obligation to provide every child with access to a good education.

The plaintiffs in the case, Vergara v. California, argued that the tenure system for public school teachers in California verges on the absurd, and that those laws disproportionately harm poor and minority students. In his ruling, Judge Rolf M. Treu agreed.

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Education
5:47 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Wednesday On Morning Edition: Free Community College

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We have been talking a lot about the cost of college on this program lately and the difficulty some graduates face paying off student loans. Tomorrow, we'll hear how some places are experimenting with free community college.

SARA GOLDRICK-RAB: It's time to make some version, some kind of piece of higher education really and truly affordable to Americans as we think about the future of our economy.

Education
5:23 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Easing Student Loan Burdens On The Frontburner For Obama, Senate

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:23 am

David Greene talks to financial aid expert Mark Kantrowitz about proposals to mitigate student loan debt from the White House and in the Senate. Kantrowitz is the founder of the website finaid.org.

Education
5:21 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Obama Acts To Ease Student Loan Payments

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:23 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. It's graduation time on college campuses around the country - a time for students and their families to celebrate. But as President Obama noted at the White House yesterday, for many students, it's also a time when the bills start coming due.

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NPR Ed
4:04 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

The One Thing Obama Didn't Say About Student Loan Repayment

President Obama signed a presidential memorandum he says could help an additional 5 million student loan borrowers — but only if they hear about it.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 7:09 pm

President Obama made big news today for student loan borrowers. He said he'll use his executive power to expand a program called Pay As You Earn, which limits borrowers' monthly debt payments to 10 percent of their discretionary income. Under the program, loans don't just get less expensive; they can actually disappear. The balance of a loan is forgiven after 20 years — 10 years if the borrower works in public service (for government or a nonprofit).

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NPR Ed
3:56 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Why NYC Is Afraid Of Free Lunch For All

In New York, three-quarters of all students qualify for free or reduced-price meals, but a third of those simply don't participate.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 6:45 pm

More than 30 million kids a year participate in the National School Lunch Program, getting free or reduced-price meals at school. Hunger experts believe many more qualify but don't use it because a.) their families haven't filled out the necessary paperwork or b.) they don't want to be seen as poor.

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Education
3:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

As College Tuition Soars, What Puts That Price Tag In Motion?

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 5:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We wanted to figure out why college costs have been rising so much, and Anya Kamenetz with the NPR Ed team joins me now to break down the numbers.

Anya, why don't we take the example of a working-class student at a four-year public university getting no help from mom and dad? What do the numbers look like?

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Education
3:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

With New Order, Obama Aims To Combat Student Debt Pressures

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 5:42 pm

President Obama is signing an executive order Monday, which will expand a loan forgiveness program for college debt. NPR's Mara Liasson looks at the program and the political salience of the issue.

The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Obama Signs Order Easing Student Loan Payments

President Obama is introduced by Andy MacCracken, before signing a Presidential Memorandum on reducing the burden of student loan debt on Monday in East Room of the White House.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 3:27 pm

(This post was updated at 3:24 p.m. ET.)

President Obama signed an order on Monday that expands the number of Americans whose student loan payments will be capped at 10 percent of their monthly incomes.

CNN reports the new order would allow an additional 5 million borrowers to take advantage of the cap beginning in December 2015.

Bloomberg adds:

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NPR Ed
7:53 am
Mon June 9, 2014

Tough Week For The Common Core

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 9:16 am

A few months ago, when I told friends and media colleagues that I was interested in the Common Core State Standards, the most common response was "What's that?"

Now, it seems, everyone has an opinion about the Core.

And right now, opinions about the K-12 learning goals for math and English that have spread nearly nationwide are trending toward the heated.

While the school year is winding down, education policy sure isn't. This past week brought a bunch of front-page news on the Common Core.

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Economy
4:46 am
Sat June 7, 2014

Job Outlook Brightens For Graduates, Though Problems Linger

Kaitlin Foran, a senior at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, meets with a prospective employer at a job fair at National Harbor in Maryland.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 2:07 pm

Congratulations Class of 2014! You are entering a labor market that offers a record number of paychecks.

On Friday, the Labor Department said the U.S. economy now has 138.5 million jobs, slightly more than the previous high set in early 2008 — just as the Great Recession was tightening its grip.

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The Two-Way
6:54 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Shooting At Seattle Pacific University; 3 Wounded, 1 Dead

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 10:24 pm

This post updated at 9:40 p.m ET.

At least three people were wounded and one was killed after a lone gunman opened fire on the campus of Seattle Pacific University, according to Seattle police. Officials say the alleged shooter is in custody.

The campus was placed on lockdown soon after the shooting began just before 3:30 p.m. PT (6:30 p.m. ET).

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Thu June 5, 2014

The Birds And The Bees ... And iPads

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:03 pm

"The talk." The facts of life. The birds and the bees. Whatever you call it, do you remember when and how you first learned about human sexuality? For me, it was a series of conversations in school and with my parents that began in third grade with the classic picture book Where Did I Come From?.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu June 5, 2014

A Master's In Media...From Conde Nast?

If she were your professor, all your work would be on time and fabulous. Or else.
Anonymous ASSOCIATED PRESS

Conde Nast, the magazine publishing company known for The New Yorker, Wired and Vogue, is getting into the US higher education market.

As our public media colleagues at Marketplace reported, the company is partnering with a venture capital firm and some as-yet-unnamed universities to launch a set of co-branded certificate courses, and eventually a master's degree.

Why is a media company getting into the higher education business? And why now?

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Economy
10:59 am
Wed June 4, 2014

There's Trouble In The Job Market For Black College Graduates

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 12:44 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
10:59 am
Wed June 4, 2014

What's Keeping Some Graduates From Getting Hired?

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 12:44 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
8:50 am
Wed June 4, 2014

For New College Grads, Finding Mental Health Care Can Be Tough

Finding a good therapist can take time, especially in a new city.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 3:41 pm

For many young people, college graduation marks the entry into what grown-ups call "the real world." But if you're a new graduate with a mental health condition, the transition can be especially challenging.

Many young people start managing their own health care for the first time when they graduate. And while finding and paying for a psychologist or psychiatrist can be difficult at any age, for young people who don't have steady jobs or stable paychecks, the task can be especially daunting. Perseverance and planning ahead help.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Wed June 4, 2014

What Does A Good Common Core Lesson Look Like?

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 8:32 am

As we're detailing this week, teachers and school leaders have a lot of work to do to adopt curricula aligned with the new Common Core State Standards.

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Education
2:37 am
Wed June 4, 2014

As Banks Open In Schools, A Chance For Students To Learn To Save

At a student-run Union Bank branch located inside Lincoln High School in Los Angeles, Calif., students can build credit and learn about finances with their real money.
Alexandra Schmidt NPR

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 10:20 am

Wearing a red Union Bank polo shirt, high school senior Jerry Liu politely helps a peer with a bank deposit. With a waiting area and even a decorative plant on the table, this could be any bank branch — but right outside this island of adulthood are the hallways of Lincoln High School in Los Angeles.

This is one of three student-run Union Bank branches in California. They're all located in low-income, immigrant-heavy neighborhoods. You can only bank here if you're a student, teacher or parent, but these are real accounts handling real money.

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NPR Ed
3:08 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Teachers Hit The Common Core Wall

Teachers in East Lansing, Mich., used the walls of a classroom to map out the Core standards and how they correspond with the current East Lansing curriculum.
Cory Turner NPR

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 8:29 am

This time next year, millions of schoolkids in the U.S. will sit down for their first Common Core test. In some places, the stakes will be high — for kids, their teachers and their communities. The goal of the Core benchmarks in reading and math is to better prepare students for college, career and the global economy. But the challenges are huge.

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Education
12:09 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

New Orleans District Moves To All-Charter School System

Transcript

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NPR Ed
7:11 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Local Views Of New Orleans' Changing School Landscape

Kenyatta Collins, a New Orleans charter school student.
Hechinger Report

New Orleans marked a milestone last week. The city's "Recovery School District" closed its remaining five public schools, making it the first public all-charter school district in the nation.

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NPR Ed
2:29 am
Tue June 3, 2014

The Common Core Curriculum Void

Just some of the more than 700 math books that have been reviewed for Common Core alignment by professor William Schmidt and his team at Michigan State's Center for the Study of Curriculum.
Cory Turner NPR

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 8:29 am

Right now, America's schools are in a sprint. Forty-four states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Common Core State Standards. That means new learning benchmarks for the vast majority of the nation's young students — millions of kids from kindergarten through high school. And, for many of them, the Core Standards will feel tougher than what they're used to. Because they are tougher.

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Education
4:47 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Do Autistic Kids Fare Better In Integrated Or Specialized Schools?

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 3:03 pm

The federal law that governs special education lays out the goals pretty clearly: Students are entitled to an appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment.

But some parents of children with autism feel their local public schools aren't meeting their kids' needs. And with autism diagnoses rising, new schools are emerging specifically for autistic children.

Some parents see these specialized schools as a godsend. For others, they raise a new set of questions.

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Education
3:36 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Despite Expansion, Many Pre-K Programs Fail To Reach Immigrant Kids

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 5:50 pm

Most states have embarked on a significant expansion of preschool programs, but a new report says they appear to be missing the kids who need these programs most: low-income, immigrant children.

NPR Ed
2:03 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Reaching Immigrant Children By Helping Their Parents

There are 96 languages spoken across the Los Angeles Unified School District; 49 percent of California's young children have an immigrant parent.
Julie Flickr

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 4:00 pm

At our neighborhood playground in Brooklyn, you can hear kids shouting and playing in Russian, Spanish, Yiddish, Tagalog, French, Hebrew, Vietnamese, Cantonese and Polish. This kind of giddy cacophony has been par for the course in New York City for 150 years, but it's becoming more and more common across the country.

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Education
6:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

New Orleans Closes Its Last Traditional Schools

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 1:43 pm

Last week, the New Orleans school district became the first all-charter district in the country. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Sarah Carr, a reporter who's been following the city's changing schools.

NPR Ed
6:17 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Is The Deck Stacked Against Black Boys In America?

President Obama, with Attorney General Eric Holder and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan, speaks about a report from My Brother's Keeper, an initiative to expand opportunities for young men and boys of color.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:27 pm

The numbers are grim. Black boys are more likely than white boys to live in poverty, and with a single parent. They're also more likely to be suspended from school and land in prison, and less likely to be able to read.

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News
3:16 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Spelling Co-Champs Beat The Bee, Leaving Judges Without Words

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Melissa, can I have a word for a moment?

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Absolutely. How about, thymelici?

SIEGEL: Oh, the dancing chorus in ancient Greek plays?

BLOCK: Yeah.

SIEGEL: No, I was thinking more of, encaenia.

BLOCK: Encaenia. The academic ceremony for conferring honorary degrees?

SIEGEL: Well, of course. Those two everyday words figured in the Scripps National Spelling Bee that ended in a rare tie yesterday.

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NPR Ed
12:03 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

New Orleans District Moves To An All-Charter System

The drill team of Sophie B. Wright, a charter school in the New Orleans Recovery School District. The city's all-charter system is the first in the U.S.
Skooksie Flickr

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 3:57 pm

The nation's largest experiment with charter schools is expanding.

The Recovery School District, a state control board that runs most schools in New Orleans, shut down the last of its five traditional public schools this week, making it the first all-charter system in the nation.

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