Education Desk

Education
6:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Transcending Music In A Special High School Band

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, BYLINE: I'm Scott Simon. Our next story comes from the NPR Ed team. Reporter Eric Westervelt visited a special high school in New York City for students with cognitive and physical disabilities. And he saw how the music curriculum there has transformed at least one young life.

TOBI LAKES: My name is Tobi Lakes. I'm 15 years old. I listen to I Heart Radio and radio.com - two apps. I practice my piano every night.

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Politics
6:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Congressman Pushes Income-Based Student Loan Plan

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 10:38 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
3:56 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

A Campus Dilemma: Sure, 'No' Means 'No,' But Exactly What Means 'Yes'?

Many colleges are grappling with how to define consensual sexual activity between students. Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, mandates that students get verbal permission before making any sexual advance.
Peggy Turbett The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 5:23 pm

As the federal government presses colleges to improve the way they handle cases of sexual assault, schools are turning their focus to defining "consent" — how to distinguish between activity that's consensual and activity that's not.

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NPR Ed
7:55 am
Fri June 13, 2014

iPads In Special Ed: What Does The Research Say?

An iPad in a classroom. So what?
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 12:36 pm

This week, NPR Ed's Eric Westervelt visited a special education classroom in New York City where iPads are being used in a novel way. Students with a range of severe disabilities, including developmental, mental, physical and autism spectrum disorders, are using apps alongside traditional instruments to help express themselves through music.

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Shots - Health News
1:36 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Cool Kids Lose, Though It May Take A Few Years

As Lindsay Lohan's character (far left) learned in the movie Mean Girls, popularity comes at a price.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:07 am

Parents, teachers and cheesy after-school specials have long tried to convince kids that being cool and popular isn't all that it's cracked up to be. Now scientists are chiming in as well.

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Education
11:52 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Who Runs The World? Rutgers Says Beyonce

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:31 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So it's summer, or close enough. A lot of college campuses are open for business. In most classrooms, if a student walked in playing Beyonce loud enough for everybody to hear, most professors would probably ask him or her to turn it off, but in Professor Kevin Allred's class that student might be asked to turn it up.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "RUN THE WORLD (GIRLS)")

BEYONCE KNOWLES: (Singing) My persuasion can build a nation. Endless power, the love we can devour. You'll do anything for me. Who run the world? Girls.

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Education
11:52 am
Thu June 12, 2014

President's Student Loan Action Might Be Too Little, Too Late

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:31 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
11:52 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Is Teacher Tenure Really The New Brown V. Board Of Education?

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:31 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Politics
2:16 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Va. Students Abuzz As Star Professors Become Political Rivals

Randolph-Macon College economics professor Dave Brat defeated House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in Tuesday's primary.
Jay Paul Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 11:16 am

The upset of Rep. Eric Cantor by Dave Brat in Tuesday's primary rocked Washington. It also left its stamp on a tiny college in Ashland, Va. Brat is a professor at Randolph-Macon College — as is his next opponent, Democrat Jack Trammell.

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U.S.
4:10 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

At The Head Of Her Class, And Homeless

Rashema Melson lives in the D.C. General homeless shelter with her mother and two brothers. "Because you live in a shelter — that's not who you are, that's just where you reside at for the moment," she says.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 5:24 pm

On Wednesday, Rashema Melson will graduate at the top of her class as the valedictorian of Anacostia High School in Washington, D.C. She's headed to Georgetown University this fall on a full scholarship.

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NPR Ed
3:36 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

A High School Band Where Everyone's Voice Can Be Heard

Adam Goldberg, the creator of the PS 177 band, conducting at band practice.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 6:53 pm

(This is Part 2 of a two-part report. Read the full piece here.)

On the surface, the PS 177 Technology Band looks like a typical high school orchestra. But there are two big differences. First, while they use traditional instruments, they also play iPads. And all of the band members have disabilities. Some have autism spectrum disorders.

"I'm Tobi Lakes. I'm 15 years old. I'm in ninth grade. I'm four grades away from college."

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Bill To Allow Refinancing Of Student Loans Dies In Senate

"Who does Washington work for?" asked Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., after her bill that would let people refinance student debt was shot down Wednesday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 1:42 pm

A bill that would have let millions of people refinance their student loans at a lower interest rate has failed in the Senate, after Republicans objected that it included a tax on the wealthy to pay for it. The measure would have allowed people with older loans to benefit from today's low interest rates.

The bill from Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., didn't get past a procedural vote, falling by a 56-38 vote. Called the Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act, it was shot down days after President Obama urged Congress to help ease the burden of student debt.

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Can I Just Tell You?
11:24 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Do You Want The Truth, Or Do You Just Like Your Story Better?

Looking at the question of academic success among school-aged black males.
Christopher Futcher iStock

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:23 pm

Finally today, another of my sad but true stories. A while back I was working on a lengthy television documentary with a colleague who was a very experienced producer, a veteran of many lengthy and complicated projects; in other words: she knew what she was doing. We had gotten to the final edit stage of a project where we were going back over a story that had been huge news at one point, but about which there had been a lot of misinformation, and one of the things we were trying to do with our piece was correct the record.

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Beauty Shop
11:24 am
Wed June 11, 2014

'Washington Post' Op-Ed Tone Deaf On View Of Sexual Assault?

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We are continuing our discussion with our Beauty Shop panel of journalists and commentators. Andra Gillespie, Bridget Johnson, Connie Schultz and Alexis Wilkinson are with us. Bridget Johnson, I just wanted to ask you briefly about, you know, your take on Hillary Clinton, and the rollout of the book and the storylines that are emerging around her assumed presidential candidacy so far - not announced, but that seems to be where things are going.

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NPR Ed
8:10 am
Wed June 11, 2014

iPads Allow Kids With Challenges To Play In High School Band

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 10:16 am

Tablet computers and a creative teacher have helped open doors for some kids with serious learning disabilities and autism spectrum disorders. The P.S. 177 Technology Band is in Queens, N.Y.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Education
5:57 am
Wed June 11, 2014

iPads Allow Kids With Challenges To Play In High School's Band

Jason Haughton sings an original tune composed by the PS 177 Technology Band.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 9:40 am

There's a steady stream of hype surrounding the pluses and pitfalls of classroom tablet computers. But for a growing number of special education students tablets and their apps are proving transformative. The tablets aren't merely novel and fun. With guidance from creative teachers, they are helping to deepen engagement, communication, and creativity.

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Food
4:25 am
Wed June 11, 2014

School Lunch Debate: What's At Stake?

kcline iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:00 pm

School lunches have never been known for culinary excellence. But to be fair, the National School Lunch Program — which provides free or reduced lunches to about 31 million kids every day — has never aimed to dazzle as much as to fill little bellies.

In 2010, Congress gave the Federal School Lunch Program a nutrition make-over. New regulations called for:

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NPR Ed
2:37 am
Wed June 11, 2014

College For Free: Tulsa's Radical Idea

Who can say no to a free college education?
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 8:49 am

The average cost of one college year across all degree-granting intuitions in the U.S. was more than $19,000 in 2012, and we don't need to tell you what direction the price is heading. Which means lots of students are now borrowing heavily to make college work. President Obama threw some of them a lifeline earlier this week, with revisions to the government's Pay As You Earn program.

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NPR Ed
2:58 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

California Teacher Tenure Ruled Unconstitutional

Attorneys Theodore Boutrous Jr. (far right) and Marcellus McRae are joined by California public school students who won their case against the state.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:31 pm

A California judge today ruled the state's laws governing teacher tenure and the firing of public school teachers unconstitutional, saying they interfere with the state's obligation to provide every child with access to a good education.

The plaintiffs in the case, Vergara v. California, argued that the tenure system for public school teachers in California verges on the absurd, and that those laws disproportionately harm poor and minority students. In his ruling, Judge Rolf M. Treu agreed.

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Education
5:47 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Wednesday On Morning Edition: Free Community College

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We have been talking a lot about the cost of college on this program lately and the difficulty some graduates face paying off student loans. Tomorrow, we'll hear how some places are experimenting with free community college.

SARA GOLDRICK-RAB: It's time to make some version, some kind of piece of higher education really and truly affordable to Americans as we think about the future of our economy.

Education
5:23 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Easing Student Loan Burdens On The Frontburner For Obama, Senate

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:23 am

David Greene talks to financial aid expert Mark Kantrowitz about proposals to mitigate student loan debt from the White House and in the Senate. Kantrowitz is the founder of the website finaid.org.

Education
5:21 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Obama Acts To Ease Student Loan Payments

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:23 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. It's graduation time on college campuses around the country - a time for students and their families to celebrate. But as President Obama noted at the White House yesterday, for many students, it's also a time when the bills start coming due.

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NPR Ed
4:04 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

The One Thing Obama Didn't Say About Student Loan Repayment

President Obama signed a presidential memorandum he says could help an additional 5 million student loan borrowers — but only if they hear about it.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 7:09 pm

President Obama made big news today for student loan borrowers. He said he'll use his executive power to expand a program called Pay As You Earn, which limits borrowers' monthly debt payments to 10 percent of their discretionary income. Under the program, loans don't just get less expensive; they can actually disappear. The balance of a loan is forgiven after 20 years — 10 years if the borrower works in public service (for government or a nonprofit).

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NPR Ed
3:56 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Why NYC Is Afraid Of Free Lunch For All

In New York, three-quarters of all students qualify for free or reduced-price meals, but a third of those simply don't participate.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 6:45 pm

More than 30 million kids a year participate in the National School Lunch Program, getting free or reduced-price meals at school. Hunger experts believe many more qualify but don't use it because a.) their families haven't filled out the necessary paperwork or b.) they don't want to be seen as poor.

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Education
3:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

As College Tuition Soars, What Puts That Price Tag In Motion?

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 5:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We wanted to figure out why college costs have been rising so much, and Anya Kamenetz with the NPR Ed team joins me now to break down the numbers.

Anya, why don't we take the example of a working-class student at a four-year public university getting no help from mom and dad? What do the numbers look like?

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Education
3:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

With New Order, Obama Aims To Combat Student Debt Pressures

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 5:42 pm

President Obama is signing an executive order Monday, which will expand a loan forgiveness program for college debt. NPR's Mara Liasson looks at the program and the political salience of the issue.

The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Obama Signs Order Easing Student Loan Payments

President Obama is introduced by Andy MacCracken, before signing a Presidential Memorandum on reducing the burden of student loan debt on Monday in East Room of the White House.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 3:27 pm

(This post was updated at 3:24 p.m. ET.)

President Obama signed an order on Monday that expands the number of Americans whose student loan payments will be capped at 10 percent of their monthly incomes.

CNN reports the new order would allow an additional 5 million borrowers to take advantage of the cap beginning in December 2015.

Bloomberg adds:

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NPR Ed
7:53 am
Mon June 9, 2014

Tough Week For The Common Core

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 9:16 am

A few months ago, when I told friends and media colleagues that I was interested in the Common Core State Standards, the most common response was "What's that?"

Now, it seems, everyone has an opinion about the Core.

And right now, opinions about the K-12 learning goals for math and English that have spread nearly nationwide are trending toward the heated.

While the school year is winding down, education policy sure isn't. This past week brought a bunch of front-page news on the Common Core.

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Economy
4:46 am
Sat June 7, 2014

Job Outlook Brightens For Graduates, Though Problems Linger

Kaitlin Foran, a senior at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, meets with a prospective employer at a job fair at National Harbor in Maryland.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 2:07 pm

Congratulations Class of 2014! You are entering a labor market that offers a record number of paychecks.

On Friday, the Labor Department said the U.S. economy now has 138.5 million jobs, slightly more than the previous high set in early 2008 — just as the Great Recession was tightening its grip.

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The Two-Way
6:54 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Shooting At Seattle Pacific University; 3 Wounded, 1 Dead

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 10:24 pm

This post updated at 9:40 p.m ET.

At least three people were wounded and one was killed after a lone gunman opened fire on the campus of Seattle Pacific University, according to Seattle police. Officials say the alleged shooter is in custody.

The campus was placed on lockdown soon after the shooting began just before 3:30 p.m. PT (6:30 p.m. ET).

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