Education Desk

TED Radio Hour
8:36 am
Fri January 17, 2014

Can Grandmothers Change The World?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 12:39 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Disruptive Leadership.

About Bunker Roy's TEDTalk

Bunker Roy shares stories from a school in India that equips rural women for leadership by training them to become solar engineers, artisans, dentists and doctors.

About Bunker Roy

Read more
Code Switch
6:18 pm
Thu January 16, 2014

White House Makes College For Low-Income Students A Priority

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama shake hands with college graduate Troy Simon, who couldn't read until he was 14. The president spoke about college opportunities in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building across from the White House on Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014.
Charles Dharapak ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 11:19 am

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama met today with over 140 college presidents at the White House. Also present at the event, were dozens of organizations committed to raising the number of low-income students who attend college.

No more than half of low-income high school graduates apply to college, so the President has asked the first lady to spearhead a national effort to encourage colleges — the more selective ones, in particular — to admit and graduate more students who are poor.

Read more
Education
5:26 pm
Thu January 16, 2014

The Obamas Hope To Ease Path For Low-Income Students

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama hosted a meeting with college presidents and organizations involved in raising the number of low-income students who pursue a college degree. No more than half of low income high school graduates apply to college right after graduation, compared to 82 percent for high-income students. The administration says it's intent on closing that gap.

Education
7:52 am
Thu January 16, 2014

Colleges Guide Low-Income Students From Getting In To Graduating

President Obama wants to see more low-income students enroll in college, but actually graduating is becoming a priority.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 10:03 am

Bryn Mawr College is located just outside Philadelphia, but every year the school goes looking for students in Boston.

Bryn Mawr typically admits 10 low-income students from the Boston area each year, providing them with financial assistance and introducing them to one another in hopes that they will form a network and support each other as they navigate their college years.

Bryn Mawr doesn't stop in Boston. Working with the nonprofit groups Posse Foundation and College Match, the college actively seeks to enroll low-income students who show great promise.

Read more
Higher Ed
4:56 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Former U Of I Band Director Pleads Guilty To Theft

Robert Rumbelow
Credit news.illinois.edu

The former director of bands at the University of Illinois has pleaded guilty to stealing musical instruments from the school and sentenced to a form of probation.  

Robert Rumbelow pleaded guilty Tuesday in Champaign County Circuit Court to one count of felony theft. According to The News-Gazette (http://bit.ly/1doNcdP) he was sentenced to two years of conditional discharge.  
Rumbelow declined comment through his attorney.  

Read more
Education
10:53 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Classrooms Getting More Diverse, But Teachers Of Color Struggle

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
The Two-Way
5:53 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Desegregation Pact Gets Judge's Approval In Arkansas

A long-running school desegregation fight in Arkansas is over, after a federal judge accepted a settlement reached by the state, lawyers for black students, and three school districts in and around Little Rock. Under the deal, the state will no longer have to send payments — around $70 million this year — to aid desegregation.

According to the terms of the deal, those payments can stop after the 2017-2018 school year. They had been mandated by a court-ordered program that also included forming magnet schools and shifting students between school districts.

Read more
Higher Ed
4:57 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

U Of I Proposes Tuition Hike For Fall

President Robert Easter
Credit U of I

University of Illinois Trustees have been asked to increase tuition within the rate of inflation for next academic year.

At their meeting in Chicago next week, they’ll be asked to raise it by 1.7 % on the three campuses, the same increase approved for last fall.    A Trustees committee recommended the plan Monday. 

It would raise tuition for in-state students to about $12,000 at the Urbana-Champaign campus, nearly $10,600 in Chicago and around $9,400 in Springfield.  Only incoming students would pay the higher rates.

Read more
Politics
4:14 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Jerry Brown Proposes A New Budget For California

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 6:36 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Today, California Governor Jerry Brown announced that the state's healthier finances will mean billions of dollars of new spending. The winners in the governor's proposed record budget include schools and welfare. He also wants millions spent on maintaining roads and parks.

Read more
Code Switch
3:20 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Los Angeles Tries A New Approach To Discipline In Schools

Attorney General Eric Holder presented yesterday the first national guidelines on school discipline. In this file photo from Oct. 2013 he attends the announcement of Jeh Johnson as the next Homeland Security Secretary.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Rosa Solache was fed up with getting teased every day before school, between classes, and even on the way home, so one day she punched her antagonist in the face.

"I was really sick of it and I had told the teacher, but no one was doing anything, so I said, 'What the heck, I'm going to take care of this by myself.'"

Solache was an eighth-grader at the time, 12 years old, and until that day, she says, "I had always been a good girl."

Read more
Education
10:34 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Students Of Color Don't Apply To Top Schools, But They Should

Deadlines to apply for colleges are coming up - and some experts say a lot of qualified minority students won't be applying to the top schools. Host Michel Martin speaks with Donald Fraser, Jr., of CollegeSnapps, Inc. and Caroline Hoxby, an economist at Stanford University about why some students of color aren't trying to get into prestigious schools.

The Two-Way
8:09 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Ease Up On 'No Tolerance' Policies, U.S. Agencies Tell Schools

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 8:56 pm

Saying that "zero tolerance" discipline policies at U.S. schools are unfairly applied "all too often," Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is urging officials to rethink that approach. The Obama administration issued voluntary guidelines today that call for more training for teachers and more clarity in defining security problems.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:40 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Obama Administration Has Little Love For 'Zero Tolerance'

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 9:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The Obama administration says schools need to rethink their disciplinary policies because they're doing more harm than good. To deal with serious offenses like physical assaults or drug possession, many states and school districts developed zero tolerance policies. But the administration says those policies were being applied too often, even for small offenses. NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports.

Read more
Education
11:21 am
Wed January 8, 2014

New Education Standards Widen Achievement Gap For English Learners?

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 2:16 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Law
12:20 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

New Law Allows Transgender Students To Choose Bathrooms And Sports Teams

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 2:15 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Education
12:20 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

How To Successfully Link GED Tests And Jobs

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 2:15 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes, we will hear from former Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe. He had a solid eight-year career in the NFL until he was released last year. Now he's saying in a newly released open letter that it was his support for same-sex marriage off the field, not his performance on it, that cost him his job. He'll tell us more about why he thinks that in just a few minutes.

Read more
Education
9:17 am
Tue January 7, 2014

District 186 Still Negotiating With Gill

Jennifer Gill

Jennifer Gill was chosen as the new superintendent for Springfield District 186 after a months-long search. But negotiations have yet to be finalized.   Gill, who currently works for McLean County schools, says the holidays slowed talks, but expects a contract will get done.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:09 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Catholic School Students Protest Firing Over Gay Marriage

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 5:56 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The issue we just heard about is also making news in suburban Seattle. A Catholic school there apparently fired a staff member for being in a same-sex marriage. NPR's Martin Kaste has more.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: Mark Zmuda was a vice principal at Eastside Catholic School until shortly before Christmas. The school says he resigned. He insists he was fired. But both sides agree about why he left.

MARK ZMUDA: They said it was because I was married to a man, and violated Catholic teaching.

Read more
Education
3:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

UNC May Have Passed Football Players With 'Phantom' Classes

The University of North Carolina is embroiled in an academic fraud case involving students who received high grades for classes that were never held. Many of those students happen to be football players. The case has resulted in the indictment of a professor, who was a department chair. Audie Cornish talks to Dan Kane, an investigative journalist at The News & Observer newspaper in Raleigh.

NPR Story
4:10 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Financial Benefits Of A College Degree Accumulate

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 7:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We've known for some time, that having more education usually leads to higher pay. Well, now a study suggests that the advantage persists even into retirement years, in part because those with more education tend to stay in the workforce longer.

NPR's Ina Jaffe covers aging and she has this story.

INA JAFFE, BYLINE: For people in their late 60's or 70's or beyond, college might seem like a long time ago. But the impact persists, says study co-author Heidi Hartmann.

Read more
Education
7:01 am
Sun January 5, 2014

GED Gets A Makeover To Keep Pace With Changing Workforce

Originally published on Sun January 5, 2014 10:13 am

The GED test is getting an overhaul. The exam has historically served adults who have fallen through the cracks of the educational system. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Anthony Carnevale, director of the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University, about the impact of the new GED exams.

Education
3:05 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

Bitter Cold Could Mean More Time Off For School Kids

Credit flickr

School administrators in Illinois say they're closely monitoring the forecast to decide whether to cancel or delay classes because of bone-chilling weather that's expected to hit the state.   The cold is coming as many students are preparing to return to school following holiday break.

The National Weather Service says air temperatures below zero will be accompanied by dangerous wind chills Monday and Tuesday.  

Read more
Education
10:03 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Tough Lessons For Teachers Of Color

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Switching gears now. If you have school-age children, they're either home from school this week or just about to go back, so you're probably thinking ahead to what your student will be doing this spring or maybe even doing some snooping about who his or her teacher will be next year. But what you might not know is that for a fair number of teachers, this could be the beginning of the end of their teaching careers.

Read more
TED Radio Hour
9:48 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Can One Girl Challenge The Traditions Of Her Village?

"It doesn't matter, your background. What matters is what you take from the opportunity you're given, where you go with that." — Kakenya Ntaiya
Ray Ortega TED

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 1:48 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Overcoming.

About Kakenya Ntaiya's TEDTalk

Kakenya Ntaiya tells the fearless story of challenging ingrained traditions, insisting on continuing school, and becoming the first girl to leave her Maasai village for college.

About Kakenya Ntaiya

Read more
Code Switch
11:11 am
Thu January 2, 2014

A Graduate Program Works To Diversify The Science World

Fisk University physics student Terreka Hart (foreground, left) looks on with a group of students from the Bridge Program — Melanie Brady, Bobby Jones, Rose Perea (seated) and Brenden Wiggins (pointing).
C. Coca Fisk University

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 5:06 pm

There is a widespread narrative in higher education that goes something like this: Colleges and universities have always accepted the best and brightest students; then, due to pressure from outside forces (some of them named "John F. Kennedy"), diversity was thrust upon the academy. In turn, schools meted out race-based scholarships, relaxed standards for certain students in order to fulfill quotas and — poof! — diversity.

Read more
Education
4:30 am
Thu January 2, 2014

After Radical Change, R.I. School Shows Signs Of Improvement

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 6:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Rhode Island's Central Falls High School made headlines in 2010 for a pretty dramatic reason: The school board fired all of its teachers as part of a draconian plan to turn around a school experiencing serious problems. The teachers were later rehired, and now, four years later, a series of reforms at Central Falls High appear to be helping. Elisabeth Harrison from Rhode Island Public Radio has the story.

Read more
Education
4:25 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Critics Say Schools' Common Core Standards Rollout Is Rushed

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 7:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:46 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

The Online Education Revolution Drifts Off Course

Students at the Oakland Military Institute took several courses offered by San Jose State and the online course provider Udacity this year. The university is now scaling back its relationship with Udacity.
Laura A. Oda MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 6:23 pm

One year ago, many were pointing to the growth of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, as the most important trend in higher education. Many saw the rapid expansion of MOOCs as a higher education revolution that would help address two long-vexing problems: access for underserved students and cost.

In theory, students saddled by rising debt and unable to tap into the best schools would be able to take free classes from rock star professors at elite schools via Udacity, edX, Coursera and other MOOC platforms.

Read more
Education
1:44 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

John Wood Community College To Get Worker Training Money

Credit John Wood Community College

Two Illinois colleges will share in a $29 million federal grant to retrain unemployed workers for high-skill jobs in transportation, distribution and logistics.  
Lewis and Clark Community College in Godfrey will lead a consortium of nine colleges in eight Mississippi River states with the goal of placing people in jobs and boosting economic development.  

Read more
The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

On Evolution, A Widening Political Gap, Pew Says

A drawing of the scientific theory of evolution, which states that living things evolve over time.
Martin Wimmer iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 6:45 pm

The divide between Republicans and Democrats on their views of the scientific theory of evolution is widening, according to a new poll released by Pew's Religion & Public Life Project.

Read more

Pages