Education Desk

Education Desk
10:46 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Interview: John Tinker & The Landmark Case On Students' Right To Free Speech

John Tinker
Credit Rachel Otwell/WUIS

Public schools are not allowed to forbid students' right to freedom of speech, unless it disrupts education. But that wasn't necessarily true until a court case from Iowa made its way to the Supreme Court back in the 60s. John Tinker was behind the case, known as Tinker v. Des Moines. He and other students went to school wearing black arm bands to protest the Vietnam War. They were kicked out and told not to come back to class unless they removed the bands and the rest as they say, is history.

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Statehouse Bureau
4:44 am
Thu April 17, 2014

How Much Would Your School District Lose?

Credit flickr/LizMarie_AK

  New data suggests just how big a hit most school districts would take if Illinois' income tax rate rolls back as scheduled at the end of the year.

Illinois' budget could play out a lot of different ways. But under one scenario -- the one Gov. Pat Quinn says will be the case if tax rates aren't kept at five percent -- kindergarten through high school classrooms across Illinois will get $450 million dollars less from the state.

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NPR Story
4:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Pay It Forward Proposal Could Help Students Afford College

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 4:09 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

NPR's been looking at how American families are paying for college and the huge debt some students are racking up. Some states are experimenting with a new idea. It's called Pay It Forward and here's how it works. The state pays for students' tuition. After they graduate and get jobs, the students are expected to repay it.

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WUIS Engage Breakfast
12:48 pm
Sun April 13, 2014

The Impact of Education on the Local Economy

Chris Farrell, Marketplace
Credit APM

Join WUIS in an important community conversation at the first 

A WUIS ENGAGE BREAKFAST
May 2, 2014, 8-9:30 a.m.
Hoogland Center for the Arts - Theatre III
AUDIO SPECIAL COMING SOON!

Special guest, Chris Farrell, is coming to Springfield to share his thoughts and take your questions about education and our local economy.   

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Education Desk
6:57 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Charter Schools: What Does The Future Hold?

Teacher Mr. Gilbert at Roberston Charter School in Decatur
Rachel Otwell/WUIS

Charter schools have long been a divisive issue. Supporters say they allow schools to teach kids free of burdensome regulations.  Opponents say they take money away from traditional schools.  In Illinois this year, those views are colliding.  In the final installment of our series, we find out about the fight at the statehouse and what it might mean for charters:

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Higher Education
3:34 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

UIC Faculty Authorizes Second Strike

Main administration building at UIC
Credit flickr/DanielXONeil

The faculty union at the University of Illinois-Chicago says its members have voted to go ahead with a second strike if negotiations with the university fail to yield an agreement.

The University of Illinois at Chicago United Faculty said in a news release that its members voted Wednesday night to authorize a strike on April 23. The union staged a two-day strike in February.  

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Charter Schools
8:55 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Charter Schools: The Fix Ailing Districts Need?

Students at Ball Charter
Rachel Otwell/WUIS

Nearly two decades ago when the state legislature paved the way for charter schools, Republicans were in control and touted them as an innovative way to improve education by removing many rules and regulations. Now there are about 145 charter school campuses across the state, the vast majority in Chicago. Supporters say they are the change an ailing education system needs, but it's a contentious topic. In this report, the first of a two-part series, we visit a charter school and explore the differing opinions about them:

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

In Turnaround, More Moms Are Staying Home, Study Says

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 2:10 pm

After decades on the decline, the number of "stay at home" moms in the U.S. has risen, with 29 percent of women with children under 18 saying they don't work outside the home, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center.

The figure from 2012 is up from 23 percent in 1999.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
12:00 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Debate: In An Online World, Are Brick And Mortar Colleges Obsolete?

Two teams debated the value of online education in an Intelligence Squared U.S. event at Columbia University.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:18 pm

Online degree programs are proliferating – and many cost a fraction of the price of a traditional, on-campus degree. Massive Open Online Courses, known as MOOCS, are also catching on in the U.S. and around the world.

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Education
11:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

With Free Tuition, Mich. Students Hear 'You Are Going To College'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. This spring, we're joining our colleagues at Morning Edition to take a closer look at paying for college. So far in this series, we've talked about navigating the mountains of paperwork, whether working during school is a good idea, and if so, how much is too much. And we've also talked about the huge debt that many students face after graduation. But imagine if all those worries went away.

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StARS Event
11:06 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Students Showcase Their Work At UIS Symposium

Credit UIS

The University of Illinois Springfield campus will give examples of what students have been up to at the upcoming  Student Arts and Research Symposium (StARS).  

From research to art projects, it's all on display. 

"It's an extremely supportive environment," said senior Brianna Werner.  "Both from faculty and other students.  Students come and do class projects at the (symposium). They'll take pictures with you. Take pictures of your posters."

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Education
4:10 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Common Core Literary Standards Require Close Reading

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 7:02 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Education
2:34 am
Wed April 9, 2014

An Education Reporter Puts Himself To The (Standardized) Test

New standardized tests put more emphasis on using evidence to support arguments.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 12:14 pm

What are the two most feared — most reviled — words in the English language?

"Tax day," maybe? Or "traffic jam"?

"Pink slip" still connotes an awful brand of helplessness, even though, I assume, most Americans who get pink-slipped these days never see a pink slip.

No, my vote is for "standardized test."

That's right. You felt it, didn't you? Shivers up the spine. The stab of a No. 2 pencil. And oh! Those monstrous, monotonous bubbles. They may as well be a legion of eyes staring back at your inadequacy.

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Around the Nation
4:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Putting Student Data To The Test To Identify Struggling Kids

Student Mack Godbee and mentor Natasha Santana-Viera go over Godbee's report card. Godbee's performance has improved since a data monitoring program identified him as a dropout risk.
Sammy Mack StateImpact Florida

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 10:14 am

At Miami Carol City Senior High in Florida, a handful of teachers, administrators and coaches are gathered around a heavy wooden table in a conference room dubbed the "War Room," looking through packets of information about several students.

There are others at the table, too: analysts from the group Talent Development Secondary, which monitors student data; City Year, a nonprofit that provides mentors; and Communities in Schools, which connects kids with health care and social services.

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It's All Politics
4:27 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Former Senate Rivals Team Up To Combat Campus Sexual Assault

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., attends a press conference calling for the creation of an independent military justice system to deal with sexual harassment and assault in the military on Feb. 6.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

After a lengthy clash over competing military sexual assault reform bills, Sens. Claire McCaskill of Missouri and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York are teaming up to push for increased funding to investigate and combat sexual assault on college campuses.

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The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

'Deltopia' Spring Break Party Morphs Into Riot In Santa Barbara

A video image from KEYT-TV shows a crowd confronting police during a weekend college party in Southern California that devolved into a street brawl. About 100 people were arrested and at least 44 people were taken to the hospital.
KEYT AP

Dozens of injuries were reported and more than 100 people were arrested in California Saturday, after people who had been attending a street party clashed with police. After the annual party near the University of California, Santa Barbara turned violent last night, hundreds of law enforcement officers were sent in to help.

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The Sunday Conversation
9:13 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Rape On Campus: Painful Stories Cast Blame On Colleges

In an 2012 op-ed published in Amherst's student newspaper, former student Angie Epifano wrote about being sexually assaulted and the response she received from the school.
Marshall Petty

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 12:49 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Angie Epifano was a freshman at Amherst College when she says she was raped by another student.

Weekend Edition reached her this week after a Harvard student anonymously detailed her own alleged sexual assault on campus in a piece for the Harvard Crimson.

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Paying For College
4:18 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Student Debt Weighs Down Women More. Blame The Wage Gap

It's probably not a surprise, but women are more burdened by student loan debt than men are. It starts right after college, when the wage gap begins.
Emma Innocenti Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 3:31 pm

When Kristine Leighton graduated from a private college five years ago with a degree in hospitality, she owed $75,000 in student loans. Each month, she paid the minimum amount of $450 and lived at home with her parents on Long Island, N.Y.

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Education
4:49 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Common Core Turns Business Leaders Against Oklahoma GOP

Conservative Republicans and business leaders are butting heads when it comes to the Common Core standards.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 6:47 pm

Mike Neal gets annoyed when he talks about politicians in his state. Just three years ago, when the Common Core State Standards for education were implemented, no one had a problem with them, says Neal, president of the Tulsa, Okla., Regional Chamber of Commerce.

"It's been a really frustrating situation to the business community in Oklahoma in that we've all been on the same page, from the governor, the House, the Senate, school board members," Neal says. "They've all been behind this."

Now, things are different.

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Education
11:50 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Schools Consider New Test Fee Amid Budget Worries

Credit creative commons

State education officials are considering retaining a
traditional college-readiness test for high school juniors but passing the cost along to school districts and possibly the students' families.
 
The move is one cost-cutting possibility after Illinois schools have seen close to $1 billion in cuts since 2009. Educators warn of more drastic cuts if
lawmakers decide not to extend a temporary income tax hike set to expire at the end of 2014.
 
State board officials estimate it will cost $14 million for all high school

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Sports
3:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Should The NCAA Change Its Rules To Pay For Play?

University of Miami President Donna Shalala cuts down the net after a basketball game against Clemson last year.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:34 pm

In the next few days, the last four teams play for the NCAA men's basketball championship, a hugely profitable event for college sports.

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Sports
3:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Basketball Prep Schools: A World Of Their Own, And Recruiting Worldwide

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

With the Final Four happening this weekend, there's a lot of attention on young basketball players and the high schools that produced them. Some of the best athletes emerge from schools that never win state championships because they operate outside of state athletic associations. In the basketball world they are called prep schools.

Alexandra Starr takes us to one such school, Our Savior New American on Long Island.

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Code Switch
2:03 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

For Latino Parents, Bilingual Classrooms Aren't Just About Language

This April 3, 2013 photo shows the inside of a classroom at Miami's Coral Way K-8 Center, the nation's largest bilingual school.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 4:41 pm

Right now, across the country, parents are in the midst of trying to get their children enrolled in bilingual classrooms for next September.

The motivation is usually straightforward. Parents want their kids to learn a foreign language. The thinking is that a second language will bring significant cultural and economic advantages.

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Paying For College
2:38 am
Thu April 3, 2014

First Test For College Hopefuls? Decoding Financial Aid Letters

Colleges send each prospective student a letter detailing a financial aid award package — but many families say the letters are difficult to understand.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 9:43 am

Around the country, millions of parents of prospective college freshmen are puzzling over one big question: How will we pay for college?

The first step for many families is reviewing the financial aid award letters they receive from each school. But often those letters can be confusing. Some are filled with acronyms and abbreviations, others lump scholarships and loans together. And because they're often very different, they're also difficult to compare.

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Education
7:47 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Some States Seek To Bless Prayer In Public Schools

High school football players in Suitland, Md., pray with their coach Ed Shields (top right) before a game in 2013.
John McDonnell The Washington Post/Getty Images

Religious groups have been testing the limits on prayer in public school for decades. Now they think they've come up with a new strategy that will allow students to pray wherever and whenever they want.

Bills have been moving in a number of states that would allow students to engage in prayer at school functions such as graduation.

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Education
4:29 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Manar Introduces Bill Changing School Funding

Sen. Andy Manar (D-Bunker Hill)

A group of Democratic lawmakers Wednesday introduced a long-awaited piece of legislation that would dramatically change the way schools are funded in Illinois for the first time since 1997. The sponsors call the measure the most comprehensive way to ensure equity across the state but say there's still work to do in gaining broad support on the regionally divisive issue.

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Paying For College
2:55 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Changing The Face Of Astronomy Research

Students from CUNY's AstroCom NYC program meet for a weekly class at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Dennis Robbins, an associate professor of science education at CUNY's Hunter College, teaches Betsy Hernandez (from left), Jaquelin Erazo, Ariel Diaz and Mario Martin.
Beth Fertig WNYC

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 12:04 pm

Shooting for the stars is expensive.

Advanced sciences like astronomy require years of study and graduate degrees. And the soaring cost of college can be a heavy obstacle for low-income and minority students hoping to break into those fields.

A program at the City University of New York hopes to lift that burden by providing scholarships and one-on-one mentoring to underrepresented students.

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Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas
3:33 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

As Texas Gets More Diverse, Educators Grab The Bull By The Horns

Students participate in orchestra practice at Dr. John Folks Middle School in suburban San Antonio. The school is brand new and was built with explosive growth in mind — the student population is expected to double to 1,200 within five years.
Melissa Block NPR

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 4:45 pm

Texas is in the midst of a population boom and demographic sea change. It's grown faster than any other state and has more than doubled its population in just 40 years, from 11 to 26 million people.

And overwhelmingly, the fastest growth is among Hispanics who now make up 38 percent of the state's population and will be the largest single group in Texas by 2020.

Majority Minority State

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Education
8:18 am
Sun March 30, 2014

What A Small Town's Teen Pregnancy Turnaround Can Teach The U.S.

Michelle Nimmons (with the red shoe) poses with some of the students in her sex education program in Denmark, S.C.
Courtesy of Michelle Nimmons

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:57 am

Thirty years ago, the small town of Denmark, S.C., had one of the state's highest teen pregnancy rates.

"We had very young grandparents, grandparents were maybe [in their] 30s," says Michelle Nimmons, who has worked for the past 30 years on the issue of teen pregnancy. "Great-grandmamas were in their 40s, and parents were in their teens, so a lot of education had to happen."

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Planet Money
2:26 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Comparing Law School Rankings? Read The Fine Print

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:12 am

When students go to law school, they make a bunch of calculations. A big one is cost: top schools charge more than $50,000 a year, and graduate-student debt is on the rise. Another key calculation: The likelihood of getting a good job after graduation.

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