Education Desk

Education
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A 'Major Shift' In Oversight Of Special Education

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan says states must ensure progress for students with disabilities.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

The Obama administration said Tuesday that the vast majority of the 6.5 million students with disabilities in U.S. schools today are not receiving a quality education, and that it will hold states accountable for demonstrating that those students are making progress.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced what he calls "a major shift" in how the government evaluates the effectiveness of federally funded special education programs.

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NPR Ed
11:05 am
Tue June 24, 2014

New Approaches To Discipline Strive To Keep Kids Out Of Jail

A jury of 9th-graders is sworn in at a "teen court" session in Michigan.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

School's out for the summer. For young people in New York City, if last summer was any guide, that may mean they're less likely to be arrested.

The connection between young people, especially poor boys of color, getting into trouble in school and getting into trouble with the law is known as the "school-to-prison pipeline."

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All Tech Considered
3:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Using A 3-D Version Of Rodin's Hands To Understand Anatomy

Rodin's Left Hand of Eustache de St. Pierre, during the scanning process (from left); computer image created from the scan; inner anatomy; and exterior scan and inner anatomy combined for an augmented reality view of the sculpture.
Photo by Matthew Hasel, render by Sarah Hegmann, Division of Clinical Anatomy, Stanford School of Medicine

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 7:07 pm

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NPR Ed
1:11 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Be A Varsity Player ... In Video Games?

League of Legends is a video game with 70 million players a month.
Riot Games, Inc

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:22 pm

Imagine the lede in the campus newspaper:

The Eagles swept to a win last night in 100 hours of tournament gameplay. Tabbz made the absolute best usage of the shields and heals that were available to him. Froggen went for utility and pushing power, while Nyph's black shields were near perfect, and he hit a bunch of bindings. Airwak's Lee Sin kick ended the encounter with a massive multicolor explosion.

Monday morning quarterbacking will never be the same.

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NPR Ed
3:32 am
Mon June 23, 2014

To Boost Attendance, Milwaukee Schools Revive Art, Music And Gym

Students in gym class at Richard Kluge Elementary in Milwaukee. Two years ago, the students had no gym, art, or music classes but that's changing as Milwaukee Public Schools re-hires teachers for these classes.
Erin Toner WUWM

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:00 pm

In the stuffy, little gymnasium at Richard Kluge Elementary in Milwaukee, 16 boys and girls are stretching, jumping and marching to music.

Two years ago, the school had no gym, art or music classes due to budget cuts. But now, Kluge students get a so-called "special" class three days a week.

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NPR Ed
9:03 am
Sat June 21, 2014

A Former Drug Dealer Gives A Great Defense Of The Liberal Arts

The Bard Prison Initiative gives inmates at six prisons around New York state the opportunity to study in person with professors from top colleges and universities in the region.
China Jorrin

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 12:00 pm

In preparation for my visit to the 11th annual commencement ceremony of the Bard Prison Initiative, I sat down for a conversation with Donnell Hughes, an alumnus of the program. BPI, as it's called, gives inmates at six prisons around New York state the opportunity to study in person with professors not only from Bard College, but from MIT, Harvard, Columbia, Vassar and local community colleges.

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NPR Ed
10:08 am
Fri June 20, 2014

The Politics Of The Common Core

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announces his plan to remove Louisiana from tests associated with the Common Core.
Melinda Deslatte AP

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal said Wednesday that he wants to cut ties with the Common Core State Standards, the benchmarks in reading and math that he helped bring to the state four years ago, and replace them with new, Louisiana-specific standards.

"We won't let the federal government take over Louisiana's education standards," Jindal said in a statement. "We're very alarmed about choice and local control over curriculum being taken away from parents and educators."

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Education Desk
5:01 am
Fri June 20, 2014

Chancellor Wise Says New U Of I Med School Should Be Small

Phyllis Wise
Credit news.illinois.edu

University of Illinois Chancellor Phyllis Wise says that a new medical school being proposed in Urbana-Champaign should be small and what she called complementary.  

Wise spoke to a group of faculty in Urbana Wednesday about the idea.  
According to The News-Gazette she said a lot of work still needs to be done on the proposal. But she said if done right the school could be an important addition to the area and the state.  

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NPR Ed
7:26 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Free College For All: Dream, Promise Or Fantasy?

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 9:56 am

"Free" is a word with a powerful appeal. And right now it's being tossed around a lot, followed by another word: "college."

A new nonprofit, Redeeming America's Promise, announced this week that it will seek federal support to make public colleges tuition-free. That effort is inspired by "Hope" and "Promise" programs like the one in Kalamazoo, Mich., which pays up to 100 percent of college tuition at state colleges and universities for graduates of the city's public high schools.

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Shots - Health News
11:49 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Kids In Juvenile Detention Face Risk Of Violent Death As Adults

Girls who were arrested and detained were at particular risk for premature death in adulthood.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:24 am

Delinquent children are much more likely than their nondelinquent peers to die violently later in life, a study finds. And girls who ended up in juvenile detention were especially vulnerable, dying at nearly five times the rate of the general population.

"This was astonishing," says Linda Teplin, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University's medical school and the lead author of the study.

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Education
3:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Philly Schools Teeter On Brink Of Layoffs, Struggling For Funding

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:33 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Once again, one of the most troubled school districts in the country is sounding alarm bells over funding. The head of the Philadelphia school district says he needs almost $100 million, and even that, he says, would just maintain a status quo he calls inadequate. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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Education
3:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Study Delivers Failing Grades For Many Programs Training Teachers

Colleges of education spend more than $6 billion every year preparing classroom teachers, but few students graduate ready to teach, according to a new study.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:33 pm

The nation's teacher-preparation programs have plenty of room for improvement, according to a new report.

A study released today by the National Council on Teacher Quality argues that teaching colleges are too lenient in their admissions criteria and have failed to prepare their students to teach subjects like reading, math and science.

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Education
5:07 am
Tue June 17, 2014

City Council In Sweden To Decide The Fate Of Homework

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:26 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Schools out for millions of American kids - no more homework for a couple of months. Students in a town in central Sweden may be doing even better. The city council is debating whether to do away with homework entirely. Local officials argue that students should be able to learn everything they need during school hours and, says one, not burden their parents with it. Now there's a thought. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Ed
4:09 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Can Schools Solve The Tech Industry's Pipeline Problem?

When Google went public with data about the diversity of its workforce, it fueled the ongoing conversation about diversity in the technology industry.
Virginia Mayo AP

It's been only a couple of weeks since Google released the diversity numbers on its workforce, and there's been a lot of talk since then about why the tech giant and others in the industry don't really reflect the American population as a whole.

A well-written piece today in Mother Jones offers some provocative thoughts on what can be done about it — and schools could play a big role.

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Education
11:29 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Is Educational Change Coming For Native Americans?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Ed
8:35 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Starbucks Will Pay For Employees To Complete College

Part-time barista, full-time student?
Yang Lee Starbucks

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 1:22 pm

Starbucks Coffee Co. today announces an unusually large tuition reimbursement for employees. It's in partnership with Arizona State University's highly ranked online program.

Starbucks employees who sign up for ASU's online courses as freshmen or sophomores will get a partial scholarship plus need-based financial aid; entering juniors and seniors with previous college credits will be able to finish their degrees with the public university for free.

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Education Desk
7:43 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Macon County Student Finishes 13th In National Spelling Bee

Yasir Hasnain
Credit WUIS

Today is officially "Yasir Hasnain Day" in the village of Forsyth.  It's in honor of the incoming freshman student's 13th place finish in the recent Scripps National Spelling Bee. 

It was Yasir's fourth time in the competition and his highest finish.   The soon to be freshman student said he had fun and, despite being in competition with one another, friendships were made.

"When I made it to the semifinals... when they had commercial breaks, we would talk about random stuff like the (NBA) Heat and the Pacers games," he said.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Sun June 15, 2014

How Trauma Affects The Brain Of A Learner

Chronic stress can cause deficiencies in the pre-frontal cortex, which is essential for learning.
John M Flickr

Our public media colleagues over at KPCC, Southern California Public Radio, have a fascinating two-part report on the efforts of schools in the Los Angeles area to address the effects of "toxic stress" on student learning.

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Education
6:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Transcending Music In A Special High School Band

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, BYLINE: I'm Scott Simon. Our next story comes from the NPR Ed team. Reporter Eric Westervelt visited a special high school in New York City for students with cognitive and physical disabilities. And he saw how the music curriculum there has transformed at least one young life.

TOBI LAKES: My name is Tobi Lakes. I'm 15 years old. I listen to I Heart Radio and radio.com - two apps. I practice my piano every night.

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Politics
6:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Congressman Pushes Income-Based Student Loan Plan

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 10:38 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
3:56 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

A Campus Dilemma: Sure, 'No' Means 'No,' But Exactly What Means 'Yes'?

Many colleges are grappling with how to define consensual sexual activity between students. Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, mandates that students get verbal permission before making any sexual advance.
Peggy Turbett The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 5:23 pm

As the federal government presses colleges to improve the way they handle cases of sexual assault, schools are turning their focus to defining "consent" — how to distinguish between activity that's consensual and activity that's not.

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NPR Ed
7:55 am
Fri June 13, 2014

iPads In Special Ed: What Does The Research Say?

An iPad in a classroom. So what?
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 12:36 pm

This week, NPR Ed's Eric Westervelt visited a special education classroom in New York City where iPads are being used in a novel way. Students with a range of severe disabilities, including developmental, mental, physical and autism spectrum disorders, are using apps alongside traditional instruments to help express themselves through music.

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Shots - Health News
1:36 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Cool Kids Lose, Though It May Take A Few Years

As Lindsay Lohan's character (far left) learned in the movie Mean Girls, popularity comes at a price.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:07 am

Parents, teachers and cheesy after-school specials have long tried to convince kids that being cool and popular isn't all that it's cracked up to be. Now scientists are chiming in as well.

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Education
11:52 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Who Runs The World? Rutgers Says Beyonce

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:31 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So it's summer, or close enough. A lot of college campuses are open for business. In most classrooms, if a student walked in playing Beyonce loud enough for everybody to hear, most professors would probably ask him or her to turn it off, but in Professor Kevin Allred's class that student might be asked to turn it up.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "RUN THE WORLD (GIRLS)")

BEYONCE KNOWLES: (Singing) My persuasion can build a nation. Endless power, the love we can devour. You'll do anything for me. Who run the world? Girls.

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Education
11:52 am
Thu June 12, 2014

President's Student Loan Action Might Be Too Little, Too Late

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:31 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
11:52 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Is Teacher Tenure Really The New Brown V. Board Of Education?

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:31 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Politics
2:16 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Va. Students Abuzz As Star Professors Become Political Rivals

Randolph-Macon College economics professor Dave Brat defeated House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in Tuesday's primary.
Jay Paul Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 11:16 am

The upset of Rep. Eric Cantor by Dave Brat in Tuesday's primary rocked Washington. It also left its stamp on a tiny college in Ashland, Va. Brat is a professor at Randolph-Macon College — as is his next opponent, Democrat Jack Trammell.

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U.S.
4:10 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

At The Head Of Her Class, And Homeless

Rashema Melson lives in the D.C. General homeless shelter with her mother and two brothers. "Because you live in a shelter — that's not who you are, that's just where you reside at for the moment," she says.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 5:24 pm

On Wednesday, Rashema Melson will graduate at the top of her class as the valedictorian of Anacostia High School in Washington, D.C. She's headed to Georgetown University this fall on a full scholarship.

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NPR Ed
3:36 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

A High School Band Where Everyone's Voice Can Be Heard

Adam Goldberg, the creator of the PS 177 band, conducting at band practice.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 6:53 pm

(This is Part 2 of a two-part report. Read the full piece here.)

On the surface, the PS 177 Technology Band looks like a typical high school orchestra. But there are two big differences. First, while they use traditional instruments, they also play iPads. And all of the band members have disabilities. Some have autism spectrum disorders.

"I'm Tobi Lakes. I'm 15 years old. I'm in ninth grade. I'm four grades away from college."

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Bill To Allow Refinancing Of Student Loans Dies In Senate

"Who does Washington work for?" asked Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., after her bill that would let people refinance student debt was shot down Wednesday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 1:42 pm

A bill that would have let millions of people refinance their student loans at a lower interest rate has failed in the Senate, after Republicans objected that it included a tax on the wealthy to pay for it. The measure would have allowed people with older loans to benefit from today's low interest rates.

The bill from Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., didn't get past a procedural vote, falling by a 56-38 vote. Called the Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act, it was shot down days after President Obama urged Congress to help ease the burden of student debt.

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