Education Desk

Around the Nation
6:08 am
Fri October 17, 2014

LA Schools Superintendent To Leave After iPad Controversy

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 7:53 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
6:03 am
Fri October 17, 2014

New Research Suggests Small High Schools May Help After All

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 3:05 pm

Findings from a new long-term study of small high schools in New York City show the approach may not only boost a student's chances of enrolling in college but also cost less per graduate.

The city began an intensive push to create smaller learning communities in its high schools in 2002. That year, the city's education department rolled out a districtwide lottery system for high school admission.

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Education Desk
3:56 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Decatur Schools Say Employee Who Visited Africa Poses No Ebola Threat

Decatur Public Schools issued a statement today saying a staff member at MacArthur High, who traveled to Africa, has been cleared by a doctor.   The announcement came after concerns from parents over potential exposure to Ebola.  

The district says the individual was in South Africa, outside of the region where Ebola has been concentrated.  

The statement released says the staff member was deemed not to be at risk and after seeing their personal physician, was cleared to return to work. 

The district's statement follows:

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Religion
3:26 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Interfaith Chaplains Revitalize An Old Role On College Campuses

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 5:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Education
3:26 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

In Crisis, Philadelphia Public Schools Revoke Teachers' Contract

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 5:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Education Desk
12:57 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Education Dilemma: When Local Control Loses Out To State Intervention

Credit flickr/dcjohn

Bet many of you didn’t know that the state of Illinois has the power to take over your local schools.

As in - fire school board members - even those you and your neighbors voted for. As in put a new superintendent in place. But two years ago - it did just that.

The state took over two school districts. One in East Saint Louis. The other in North Chicago...a low income and racially mixed suburb wedged between more the tony North Shore and Waukegan.

KOCH: You have to take actions when kids aren’t getting the basics. And that’s certainly what’s happening here.

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Education
11:03 am
Thu October 16, 2014

LA Schools Superintendent To Step Down Amid iPad Controversy

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 12:09 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Race
4:34 am
Thu October 16, 2014

Black Students Gather At Harvard To Watch 'Dear White People'

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 1:22 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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A Closer Look At Sexual Assaults On Campus
5:54 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

Harvard Law Professors Say New Sexual Assault Policy Is One-Sided

A group of professors at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Mass., has slammed the school's new sexual assault policy, saying it gives victims an unfair advantage.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 16, 2014 9:32 am

Just a few months after Harvard University announced a new, tougher policy against campus sexual assault, a group of Harvard law professors is blasting the rules as unfair.

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Goats and Soda
11:25 am
Wed October 15, 2014

What Will Malala's Nobel Peace Prize Mean For Girls' Education?

Afghan schoolgirls take lessons outdoors at a refugee camp near Jalalabad.
Noorullah Shirzada AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 15, 2014 2:23 pm

When Malala Yousafzai found out last Friday that she'd won the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi, the 17-year-old Pakistani girl didn't celebrate immediately. Instead she returned to a chemistry class at her high school in Birmingham, England.

It was a fitting reaction by someone who's risked her life for the right to be educated.

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NPR Ed
9:47 am
Wed October 15, 2014

A New Credential For The Tech Industry

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 12:31 pm

A leader in the small but growing industry of "coder boot camps" announced plans today to develop a new set of credentials aimed at certifying the skills these programs teach.

The boot camps have surged in popularity to meet the demand for tech industry jobs such as software developers. That occupation is among the fastest-growing in the nation, projected to add a total of 220,000 jobs between 2012 and 2022.

Despite that demand — and a median annual salary of $93,000 — companies have struggled to fill those jobs.

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NPR Ed
1:03 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

Identifying The Worst Colleges In America

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 2:22 pm

For years,Washington Monthly has been rating and ranking the nation's colleges.

But for its 2014 edition, the magazine has done something new. It has put out a list of what it says are the nation's worst colleges. That is, schools with high tuition, low graduation rates and high student debt rates.

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NPR Story
4:09 am
Tue October 14, 2014

School Facilities Strained By Boom In Petroleum Engineering

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 7:00 am

Copyright 2014 KUNC-FM. To see more, visit http://kunc.org.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Mon October 13, 2014

Daniel Tiger: Won't You Be His Neighbor?

Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood is in its second season on PBS.
PBS

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 12:31 pm

Lexi Schaefers' preschoolers squeal with excitement. Their eyes are trained on an animated tiger dressed in a red hoodie and sneakers, peeking out of the TV at them.

These 3- and 4-year-olds at Shady Lane Preschool in Pittsburgh, Pa., sing along with the songs and laugh and mimic what the characters are doing onscreen.

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NPR Ed
2:23 am
Mon October 13, 2014

A New Orleans Charter School Marches To Its Own Tune

Art projects like these anatomy murals are woven into the curriculum at the Homer Plessy Community Charter school in New Orleans.
Eric Westervelt/NPR

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 8:42 am

This year, NPR Ed is reporting on the dramatic changes in the New Orleans school system.

All startups face big hurdles. But when you're a startup school in one of America's poorest cities, without deep-pocket backers, the challenges are daunting.

Oscar Brown is a New Orleans native. He grew up in the Desire housing project, a little over a mile west of his current home in a neighborhood ravaged by the storm that struck nearly a decade ago.

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NPR Ed
3:55 pm
Sun October 12, 2014

To Cut Student Debt, Florida College Cuts Off Some Student Borrowing

Students at Broward College in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., attend a debt management workshop. Broward is one of 29 colleges that no longer accepts unsubsidized student loans. The effort is part of an experiment to cut down on student loan debt and defaults.
John O'Connor WLRN

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 5:52 pm

To get a student loan at Broward College, one of Florida's largest community colleges, you first have to sit through a two-hour financial lesson with Kent Dunston.

It's a little like Scared Straight, the 1978 documentary designed to keep kids from ending up in prison.

Dunston's lesson, though, is about scaring students into making good financial choices. Nationwide, student loans total more than $1.2 trillion. And schools now face punishment — even closure — by the federal government if the rate is too high.

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NPR Ed
11:57 am
Sat October 11, 2014

It's 2014. All Children Are Supposed To Be Proficient. What Happened?

President George W. Bush, seated, signs No Child Left Behind into law at Hamilton High School in Hamilton, Ohio.
Ron Edmonds ASSOCIATED PRESS

Take yourself back to those highly emotional, patriotic months after the 9/11 attacks.

In the midst of war, terrorism, fear and mourning, one bill passed 87-10 in the Senate and by a similar margin in the House — with equal support from both sides of the aisle. It was signed into law in January 2002 by George W. Bush, with the liberal lion of the Senate, Ted Kennedy, by his side.

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
5:09 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Springfield Faculty Takes Stand on Academic Freedom

Steven Salaita held a press conference at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign on Sept. 9.
Credit WILL

The University of Illinois Springfield Campus Senate today/Friday passed a measure aimed at protecting academic freedom.

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NPR Ed
3:38 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Digital Natives, Except When It Comes To Textbooks

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:13 pm

The spiral of destruction.

We're not talking about instability in the Middle East or Ebola.

We're talking textbooks.

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Illinois Issues - Education Desk
3:57 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

UIS Faculty Tackles Resolution On Academic Freedom

Steven Salaita speaks at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the summer.
Credit WILL

On Friday, the Campus Senate of the University of Illinois at Springfield will take up a strongly-worded resolution written in the aftermath of the Board of Trustees' controversial dismissal of Steven Salaita. 

He's the professor whose job offer at the university's main campus was rescinded after his critical and sometimes profane tweets about the Israeli conflict with Gaza.

UIS Senate chair Jorge Villegas said the resolution is in response to the Board's position that tenure comes with a requirement of civility.

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NPR Ed
3:03 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Who Needs Algebra? New Approach To College Math Helps More Pass

Ashjame Pendarvis, a first-year community college student, works on her math homework at the University of District of Columbia.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:16 am

Let's start with a little word problem. Sixty percent of the nation's 12.8 million community college students are required to take at least one course in subject X. Eighty percent of that 60 percent never move on past that requirement.

  1. Let Y = the total percentage of community college students prevented from graduating simply by failing that one subject, X. What is Y?

    The answer: Y = 48.

  2. And if you haven't guessed it by now, What is X?

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Planet Money
2:58 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

How College Students Battled Textbook Publishers To A Draw, In 3 Graphs

Quoctrung Bui/NPR

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 12:18 pm

College textbooks are expensive. You probably already know this. A new biology or economics book can cost $300.

And prices have been soaring, doubling over the past decade, growing faster than the price of housing, cars, even health care.

But, surprisingly, the amount students actually spend on textbooks has not been rising. In fact, the best data we could find on this shows students have been spending a bit less over time.

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New Boom
3:20 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

A Silent Majority Of Undereducated And Underemployed Millennials

Fabianie Andre with her 3-year-old daughter, Leilah, at their home in suburban Boston. Andre is one of many millennials who lack a college education.
Asma Khalid WBUR

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 11:16 am

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

Millennials are often mocked as Starbucks baristas with Ivy League educations.

And while they are the best-educated generation to date, data from the Pew Research Center show about two-thirds of millennials between ages 25 and 32 lack a bachelor's degree.

That majority is often ignored in conversations about millennials.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Tue October 7, 2014

Competency-Based Education: No More Semesters?

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri November 21, 2014 12:32 pm

"I went to a four-year university." "That job requires a one-year certificate." "It's a two-semester course." "She's a fifth-year senior." What do these expressions have in common? They use time as the yardstick for higher education.

Essentially, this means measuring not how much you've learned, but how long you've spent trying to learn it.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Sat October 4, 2014

Q&A: Plumbing The Mysteries Of The Teenage Brain

Professor Laurence Steinberg, of Temple University, says adolescence should be conceived of as lasting from puberty to the early 20s.
Axel Griesch Fotografie Tel. 004 Laurence Steinberg

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 8:46 pm

Do you remember the summer when you first fell in love? The songs that were playing on the radio, butterflies in the stomach, the excitement of a stolen kiss? The tendency of our brains to especially hold onto memories from the teenage years is called the "reminiscence bump."

It's one of the many distinctive characteristics of the adolescent brain that psychologist Laurence Steinberg lays out in his new book, Age of Opportunity: Lessons from the New Science of Adolescence.

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Education
6:57 am
Sat October 4, 2014

Dancer Needed To Move To Think

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 12:50 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Dame Gillian Lynne is Broadway royalty. She choreographed "Cats," "Phantom Of The Opera." Today she's 88, still dancing and still happily married.

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TED Radio Hour
7:37 am
Fri October 3, 2014

How Do Schools Kill Creativity?

Ken Robinson proposes a more creative system of education.
Asa Mathat TED

Originally published on Tue October 7, 2014 10:31 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Source of Creativity

About Ken Robinson's TED Talk

Sir Ken Robinson makes a case for creating an education system that nurtures — rather than stifles — creativity.

About Ken Robinson

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Fri October 3, 2014

Take The NPR Ed Visitor Survey

Ah, the good old days.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 12:32 pm

It's been more than four months since we officially launched NPR Ed, and now it's your chance to tell us how we're doing.

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American Made: The New Manufacturing Landscape
6:06 am
Fri October 3, 2014

U.S. Manufacturing: A Remembrance And A Look Ahead

A worker cuts slabs of steel at a mill in Cleveland in 2004.
Ron Schwane AP

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 10:28 am

If it weren't for American manufacturing, I wouldn't be here today.

Literally.

A century ago, my grandfather moved from Poland to Youngstown, Ohio, to work in a steel mill. At the time, Ohio factories were cranking out steel slabs, tires and cars — building a mountain of wealth that the next generation could climb. And the generation after that.

But what will happen in the 21st century? Is the path that led to higher ground blocked now?

The answer is complicated.

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Around the Nation
5:29 am
Fri October 3, 2014

Michigan Football Apologizes For Letting QB With A Concussion Play

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 6:36 am

Copyright 2014 WDET-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wdet.org.

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