Education Desk

NPR Ed
9:38 am
Tue July 8, 2014

How A Text Message Could Revolutionize Student Aid

Could students soon text their way to financial aid?
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 12:53 pm

Every year, more than a million students don't complete the FAFSA — the main federal student-loan application.

One big reason? The form is so complicated that it discourages some people from even trying.

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Tue July 8, 2014

The Collapse Of Corinthian Colleges

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 9:39 am

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NPR Ed
7:36 am
Mon July 7, 2014

What We Don't Know About Summer School

While their friends line up for ice cream, some students are stuck in summer school.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 9:01 am

It's a warning echoed in countless teen movies — "If you don't pass this class, you'll go to summer school!" Kids for generations have been threatened with the elusive summer school: fail this test, miss this day and kiss your vacation goodbye.

This summer is no exception, with districts around the country pulling students in for all sorts of programs. But surprisingly, it's really hard to get a head count — either nationally or at the district level — of how many kids are going to summer school.

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Men In America
3:00 pm
Fri July 4, 2014

Chicago Students Enroll As Boys, And Graduate As College-Bound Men

In one of the waiting rooms of the Chicago Civic Opera House, Urban Prep graduates dance and let off some steam before the school's commencement ceremony begins.
Cheryl Corley/NPR

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 5:27 pm

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

In America, nearly 40 percent of black boys live in poverty, and barely half will graduate from high school.

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NPR Ed
6:38 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Big Data Comes To College

The Course Signals dashboard tells professors how their students are doing at a glance.
Information Technology at Purdue

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 12:18 pm

When students at Purdue University are reading their homework assignments, sometimes the assignments are reading them too.

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NPR Ed
4:19 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Coaching First-Generation Students Through College

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 5:08 am

One-third of college students are the first in their families to enroll in college. But few of them graduate within six years, according to the Department of Education.

One program is working to change that, one student at a time. Juma Ventures isn't just trying to get kids into college ... it's trying to get them through it.

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Election 2014
8:01 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Quinn Gets Teacher Union Nod

Unions were upset with Governor Pat Quinn for his role in Illinois' pension overhaul.  But that didn't stop the state's largest teachers' union from endorsing him.  

The Illinois Education Association hasn't even had a year to get over the legislative equivalent of a knife-in-the-back.

Though the IEA endorsed Quinn in the 2010 governor's race, he both advocated for, and signed, the law that reduces public school teachers' pensions.

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Education Desk
7:47 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Lower School Age Among New Laws

Credit flickr/Robert.S. Donovan

Illinois children are required to attend school at a younger age and young adults seeking driver's licenses must complete training under several new laws effective this week.  

Children must enter kindergarten by the time they are 6 years old under one new law. The previous requirement was 7 years old. State officials say that might mean higher costs for some schools.  

Another new law requires students to learn CPR and how to operate machines used for emergency heart problems.  

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NPR Ed
9:03 am
Wed July 2, 2014

The Return Of The One-Room Schoolhouse

The West Street Schoolhouse in Southington, Ct., was built around 1760. It was heated with a potbellied wood stove.
National Register of Historic Places

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:52 pm

Even if your grandpa didn't walk uphill to school both ways, or have to break the ice on the bucket before fetching a drink with the dipper, you probably have iconic images in your mind of the one-room schoolhouse. It's a storied piece of America's past dating back to the Colonial era.

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Economy
3:11 am
Wed July 2, 2014

A 'Lost Generation Of Workers': The Cost Of Youth Unemployment

Alexandria Roberts, 23, recently graduated from the University of Nevada but hasn't been able to find full-time work. She plans to join the military soon, unless her employment situation changes.
Will Stone Reno Public Radio

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:52 am

It makes some sense that young people might work less than their older counterparts. They are figuring out their lives, going in and out of school and making more short-term plans.

But a whopping 5.8 million young people are neither in school nor working. It is "a completely different situation than we've seen in the past," says Elisabeth Jacobs, the senior director for policy and academic programs at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth.

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NPR Ed
3:46 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

A Role Model Pipeline For Young Black Men

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:20 pm

This story is part of the "Men in America" series on All Things Considered.

Fewer than 2 percent of the nation's elementary school teachers are black men. A program at Clemson University in South Carolina is looking to change that.

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Shots - Health News
2:26 am
Mon June 30, 2014

Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets

If you've noticed that kids seem to be better at figuring out these things, you're not alone.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 12:32 pm

Ever wonder why children can so easily figure out how to work the TV remote? Or why they "totally get" apps on your smartphone faster than you? It turns out that young children may be more open-minded than adults when it comes to solving problems.

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Strange News
10:55 am
Sun June 29, 2014

How 'Professor Godzilla' Learned To Roar

For William Tsutsui, incoming president of Hendrix College and author of Godzilla On My Mind, the iconic lizard is an obsession and an inspiration.
Hillsman Jackson

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 3:15 pm

Hendrix College, a small school outside of Little Rock, Ark., is about to get a new president. His name is William Tsutsui, a Princeton-, Oxford-, and Harvard-educated economist, but he's best known for a certain expertise that has landed him the nickname Professor Godzilla.

Tsutsui first heard the infamous roar of the radioactive monster lizard when he was 8 years old, living in the tiny college town of Bryan, Texas.

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NPR Ed
10:00 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Chasing The Elusive 'Quality' In Online Education

You can learn jazz appreciation from a computer. But you'll never learn how to be cool like Miles Davis.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 12:46 pm

Jeff Hellmer is an accomplished jazz pianist who has taught music at the University of Texas at Austin for 27 years. He thinks of himself as more than a teacher, though: "What I would like to do with my teaching is be an ambassador for jazz."

This past spring, in what's become an increasingly common move, he brought his ambassadorship to a wider audience. He turned his popular introductory course, Jazz Appreciation, into a free 10-week online course.

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NPR Ed
3:03 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Move Over Books: Libraries Let Patrons Check Out The Internet

The New York Public Library found that 55 percent of its patrons reported not having broadband access at home.
Jeffrey Zeldman Flickr

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 6:01 pm

Imagine being able to walk into a public library and check out a Wi-Fi hot spot as if it were just another book. Soon, patrons in two major U.S. cities won't have to imagine it.

The public library systems in New York and Chicago won funding from the Knight Foundation to experiment with the idea of hot-spot lending. Both say they hope the move will help them expand Internet access among low-income families.

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NPR Ed
3:03 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Giving Boys A Bigger Emotional Toolbox

Ashanti Branch, an assistant principal at Montera Middle School in Oakland, Calif., leads boys in a "check in" circle at his after-school Ever Forward Club.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 2:38 pm

This story is part of the "Men In America" series on All Things Considered.

Is America's dominant "man up" ethos a hypermasculine cultural construct, a tenet rooted in biological gender difference or something in between?

Educator Ashanti Branch doesn't much care or, more accurately, doesn't have time to care.

He's too busy trying to make a difference in boys' lives.

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NPR Ed
1:03 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

What Kids Can Learn From A Water Balloon Fight

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 8:30 pm

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Education
4:25 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

To 'Immunize' Kids Against Illiteracy, Break Out A Book In Infancy

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:24 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. Read to your children. This isn't the first time you've heard that advice. But now parents with infants will start hearing it officially from pediatricians starting from birth. The American Academy of Pediatrics announced new guidance today for parents to quote, "immunize their children against illiteracy."

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Education
3:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A 'Major Shift' In Oversight Of Special Education

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan says states must ensure progress for students with disabilities.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

The Obama administration said Tuesday that the vast majority of the 6.5 million students with disabilities in U.S. schools today are not receiving a quality education, and that it will hold states accountable for demonstrating that those students are making progress.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced what he calls "a major shift" in how the government evaluates the effectiveness of federally funded special education programs.

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NPR Ed
11:05 am
Tue June 24, 2014

New Approaches To Discipline Strive To Keep Kids Out Of Jail

A jury of 9th-graders is sworn in at a "teen court" session in Michigan.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:14 pm

School's out for the summer. For young people in New York City, if last summer was any guide, that may mean they're less likely to be arrested.

The connection between young people, especially poor boys of color, getting into trouble in school and getting into trouble with the law is known as the "school-to-prison pipeline."

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All Tech Considered
3:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Using A 3-D Version Of Rodin's Hands To Understand Anatomy

Rodin's Left Hand of Eustache de St. Pierre, during the scanning process (from left); computer image created from the scan; inner anatomy; and exterior scan and inner anatomy combined for an augmented reality view of the sculpture.
Photo by Matthew Hasel, render by Sarah Hegmann, Division of Clinical Anatomy, Stanford School of Medicine

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 7:07 pm

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NPR Ed
1:11 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Be A Varsity Player ... In Video Games?

League of Legends is a video game with 70 million players a month.
Riot Games, Inc

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:22 pm

Imagine the lede in the campus newspaper:

The Eagles swept to a win last night in 100 hours of tournament gameplay. Tabbz made the absolute best usage of the shields and heals that were available to him. Froggen went for utility and pushing power, while Nyph's black shields were near perfect, and he hit a bunch of bindings. Airwak's Lee Sin kick ended the encounter with a massive multicolor explosion.

Monday morning quarterbacking will never be the same.

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NPR Ed
3:32 am
Mon June 23, 2014

To Boost Attendance, Milwaukee Schools Revive Art, Music And Gym

Students in gym class at Richard Kluge Elementary in Milwaukee. Two years ago, the students had no gym, art, or music classes but that's changing as Milwaukee Public Schools re-hires teachers for these classes.
Erin Toner WUWM

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:00 pm

In the stuffy, little gymnasium at Richard Kluge Elementary in Milwaukee, 16 boys and girls are stretching, jumping and marching to music.

Two years ago, the school had no gym, art or music classes due to budget cuts. But now, Kluge students get a so-called "special" class three days a week.

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NPR Ed
9:03 am
Sat June 21, 2014

A Former Drug Dealer Gives A Great Defense Of The Liberal Arts

The Bard Prison Initiative gives inmates at six prisons around New York state the opportunity to study in person with professors from top colleges and universities in the region.
China Jorrin

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 12:00 pm

In preparation for my visit to the 11th annual commencement ceremony of the Bard Prison Initiative, I sat down for a conversation with Donnell Hughes, an alumnus of the program. BPI, as it's called, gives inmates at six prisons around New York state the opportunity to study in person with professors not only from Bard College, but from MIT, Harvard, Columbia, Vassar and local community colleges.

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NPR Ed
10:08 am
Fri June 20, 2014

The Politics Of The Common Core

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announces his plan to remove Louisiana from tests associated with the Common Core.
Melinda Deslatte AP

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal said Wednesday that he wants to cut ties with the Common Core State Standards, the benchmarks in reading and math that he helped bring to the state four years ago, and replace them with new, Louisiana-specific standards.

"We won't let the federal government take over Louisiana's education standards," Jindal said in a statement. "We're very alarmed about choice and local control over curriculum being taken away from parents and educators."

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Education Desk
5:01 am
Fri June 20, 2014

Chancellor Wise Says New U Of I Med School Should Be Small

Phyllis Wise
Credit news.illinois.edu

University of Illinois Chancellor Phyllis Wise says that a new medical school being proposed in Urbana-Champaign should be small and what she called complementary.  

Wise spoke to a group of faculty in Urbana Wednesday about the idea.  
According to The News-Gazette she said a lot of work still needs to be done on the proposal. But she said if done right the school could be an important addition to the area and the state.  

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NPR Ed
7:26 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Free College For All: Dream, Promise Or Fantasy?

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 9:56 am

"Free" is a word with a powerful appeal. And right now it's being tossed around a lot, followed by another word: "college."

A new nonprofit, Redeeming America's Promise, announced this week that it will seek federal support to make public colleges tuition-free. That effort is inspired by "Hope" and "Promise" programs like the one in Kalamazoo, Mich., which pays up to 100 percent of college tuition at state colleges and universities for graduates of the city's public high schools.

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Shots - Health News
11:49 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Kids In Juvenile Detention Face Risk Of Violent Death As Adults

Girls who were arrested and detained were at particular risk for premature death in adulthood.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:24 am

Delinquent children are much more likely than their nondelinquent peers to die violently later in life, a study finds. And girls who ended up in juvenile detention were especially vulnerable, dying at nearly five times the rate of the general population.

"This was astonishing," says Linda Teplin, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University's medical school and the lead author of the study.

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Education
3:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Study Delivers Failing Grades For Many Programs Training Teachers

Colleges of education spend more than $6 billion every year preparing classroom teachers, but few students graduate ready to teach, according to a new study.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:33 pm

The nation's teacher-preparation programs have plenty of room for improvement, according to a new report.

A study released today by the National Council on Teacher Quality argues that teaching colleges are too lenient in their admissions criteria and have failed to prepare their students to teach subjects like reading, math and science.

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Education
3:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Philly Schools Teeter On Brink Of Layoffs, Struggling For Funding

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:33 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Once again, one of the most troubled school districts in the country is sounding alarm bells over funding. The head of the Philadelphia school district says he needs almost $100 million, and even that, he says, would just maintain a status quo he calls inadequate. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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