Education Desk

NPR Ed
6:03 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Q&A: Raising Kids Who Want To Read

There's a big difference between teaching kids to read and teaching them to love reading.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 8:10 am

In his new book, Raising Kids Who Read, Daniel Willingham wants to be clear: There's a big difference between teaching kids to read and teaching them to love reading.

And Willingham, a parent himself, doesn't champion reading for the obvious reasons — not because research suggests that kids who read for pleasure do better in school and in life.

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NPR Ed
3:37 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Why Many Smart, Low-Income Students Don't Apply To Elite Schools

Kristen Hannah Perez, a low-income, high-achieving student from Celina, Texas, plans to attend Dartmouth€ College next fall.
Shereen Meraji/NPR

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 7:01 pm

Right now, high school seniors across the country are trying hard not to think about what is — or isn't — coming in the mail.

They're anxiously awaiting acceptance letters (or the opposite) from their top-choice colleges and universities. But this story isn't about them. It's about a big group of seniors who could get into great schools but don't apply: high-achieving students from low-income families who live outside of America's big cities.

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NPR Ed
2:36 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Nancie Atwell Of Maine Wins $1 Million Global Teaching Prize

Nancie Atwell (center) poses with former U.S. President Bill Clinton (left) and Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, prime minister of the United Arab Emirates and ruler of Dubai, after she won the $1 million Global Teacher Prize in Dubai on Sunday.
Kamran Jebreili AP

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 4:06 pm

This weekend, Maine teacher Nancie Atwell was awarded the first Global Teacher Prize, a $1 million award intended to be the "Nobel Prize of teaching."

Growing up, Atwell, 63, never expected to become a teacher, or even to go to college. But from the moment she began teaching in 1973, Atwell says she felt right at home.

"I am so inspired by all my students, but especially the seventh- and eighth-graders," she says. "They are so uninhibited and if you ask them to do something they will just work their heads and hearts off."

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Health
4:17 pm
Sun March 15, 2015

Amid Rising Concern About Addiction, Universities Focus On Recovery

Students in recovery from substance abuse are finding support on a growing number of college and university campuses, including the University of Texas at Austin.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 5:22 pm

In murder mystery novels, when the hero, a private detective or homicide cop, drops by a late-night Alcoholics Anonymous meeting to stave off a sudden craving for a beer or two or 20, it's usually in some dingy church basement or dilapidated storefront on the seedier side of town. There's a pot of burnt coffee and a few stale doughnuts on a back table.

The Center for Students in Recovery at the University of Texas could not be more different.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Six Things We Learned At South By Southwest EDU

SXSW Edu Logo

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 5:58 am

The NPR Ed team is back from Austin, where we connected with hundreds of educators and people excited about education at the annual South By Southwest Edu Conference. As with many conferences, there's just as much to be gained from conversations in the hallways and chance encounters as from the official sessions. Here's what we learned from both.

1) For many teachers, the most important tech tools are free.

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NPR Ed
6:53 am
Sun March 15, 2015

From Afghanistan's Rubble, A Teacher Builds A School Of Ideas

Aziz Royesh is one of 10 finalists for the $1 million Global Teacher Prize.
Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR

Originally published on Sun March 15, 2015 10:03 am

Aziz Royesh is a man whose life has been defined by one over-arching ambition: He says he simply wants to be a teacher.

At 46, he has achieved that goal in one of the most difficult and dangerous environments in the world — Afghanistan. He has also founded a school that is now winning international acclaim as a model for education in that war-battered nation.

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The Two-Way
7:56 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Fraternity's Defense Lawyer Not Ruling Out Suing OU

Lawyer Stephen Jones has been retained by a board representing the recently-disbanded Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapter at the University of Oklahoma. He said Friday he's not ruling out a lawsuit.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Lawyer Stephen Jones, hired yesterday by members of Oklahoma University's disbanded chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, said today he's hopeful he can avoid a lawsuit against the school but he's not ruling one out.

Jones, who is most widely known for defending Timothy McVeigh in the Oklahoma City bombing trial, was retained by a board of alumni who oversee the OU chapter of SAE.

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The Two-Way
3:33 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Athletes Help Cheerleader With Down Syndrome Defy Bullies

Alyssa Smith readjusts Desiree Andrews' hair as they cheer for the seventh grade basketball team at Lincoln Middle School on Monday in Kenosha, Wis. The gym has been dubbed "D's House" in Desiree's honor.
Kevin Poirier/Kenosha News AP

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 4:39 pm

In Wisconsin, what began as a heartwarming show of courtesy and affection is now making Desiree Andrews, 14, into an international celebrity.

Desiree is a cheerleader at Lincoln Middle School in Kenosha, Wis. She has Down syndrome — and as some hecklers learned last year, she has the full support of her school's basketball team and her community.

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Fri March 13, 2015

The (Million-Dollar) Value Of Great Teaching

The 10 finalists for this year's Global Teacher Prize (clockwise from top left): Jacque Kahura, Stephen Ritz, Phalla Neang, Azizullah Royesh, Richard Spencer, Guy Etienne, Madenjit Singh, Naomi Volain, Kiran Bir Sethi and Nancie Atwell.
Courtesy of Global Teacher Prize

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 12:27 pm

What's the best way to engage and prepare students? For 10 teachers across the world that's the million-dollar question — literally.

This Sunday, the Varkey Foundation will award $1 million to one remarkable teacher as part of its first Global Teacher Prize. Founded in 2010, the Varkey Foundation is a Dubai-based organization that trains and funds teachers internationally.

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U.S.
4:29 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

In Idaho School District, Preschool At Risk Without Federal Funds

Idaho preschool teacher Mary Allen listens to one of her students during their afternoon snack time. The state doesn't have public preschool, so programs are paid for through a hodgepodge of funding sources.
Emilie Ritter Saunders KBSX

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 5:43 pm

The Basin School District in rural south-central Idaho has something most districts in the state don't: preschool. But now that's at risk because of federal funding cuts.

It's not alone: Sparsely populated school districts and counties covered in federal forest lands will have less money this year — $250 million less — because Congress allowed the Secure Rural Schools Act to expire.

Since Idaho doesn't have public preschool, schools that want to offer it have to find creative ways to pay for the program — state money isn't an option.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu March 12, 2015

Ditching The Common Core Brings A Big Test For Indiana

Indiana squeezed the normal life cycle of a test—pilot, field, real—into one, massive exam that clocked in at 12 hours.
LA Johnson/NPR

Every eldest child knows all too well: Going first can be tough.

There's no one to help you pick the good teachers at school or give you advice on how to tell Mom and Dad about that fender bender.

Right now, Indiana is the firstborn, feeling its way through some thorny — and consequential — education decisions with little precedent to lean on.

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NPR Ed
4:10 am
Thu March 12, 2015

A Child Of Slavery Who Taught A Generation

Anna Julia Cooper was the fourth African-American woman in the U.S. to earn a doctoral degree.
Scurlock Studios Smithsonian

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 12:15 pm

Some great teachers change the life of a student, maybe several. Anna Julia Cooper changed America.

Cooper was one of the first black women in the country to earn a Ph.D. Before that, she headed the first public high school for black students in the District of Columbia — Washington Colored High School. It later became known as the M Street School and was eventually renamed for poet Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Dunbar was a citadel of learning in segregated Washington, a center for rigorous study and no-holds-barred achievement. Its graduates over the years include:

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The Salt
4:35 pm
Wed March 11, 2015

Why Some Schools Serve Local Food And Others Can't (Or Won't)

A lunch served by the Yarmouth, Maine, School Department on Sept. 26, 2014, featured Sloppy Joe's made with Maine beef and local beets, carrots, apples and potato salad. More than 80 percent of Maine schools said they served local foods in a survey conducted by the USDA.
U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 3:23 pm

For many years, if a public school district wanted to serve students apples or milk from local farmers, it could face all kinds of hurdles. Schools were locked into strict contracts with distributors, few of whom saw any reason to start bringing in local products. Those contracts also often precluded schools from working directly with local farmers.

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NPR Ed
8:23 am
Wed March 11, 2015

The Teenage Brain: Spock Vs. Captain Kirk

Imagine the adolescent brain as the bridge from Star Trek's USS Enterprise, host to a constant tug of war between the impulsive Captain Kirk (limbic system) and the reasonable Mr. Spock (prefrontal cortex).
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 5:43 pm

This story was written for the series, "Being 12: The Year Everything Changes," from member station WNYC.

If adolescence has a poster child, it's a teenager. In a car. Smoking, drinking, and driving badly while also, somehow, having sex in the back seat.

But changes in the brain that lead to the famously bad choices of adolescence don't start at 16 or 17 years old. They start around 11 or 12 and the beginning of puberty.

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Wed March 11, 2015

2 Oklahoma Students Seen In Racist Fraternity Video Apologize

University of Oklahoma students march to the now-closed Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house during a rally against racism Tuesday. Two former members of the fraternity have apologized for their roles in a video that showed them singing a racist chant.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Wed March 11, 2015 1:04 pm

Two men who were in a video of Sigma Alpha Epsilon members singing a racist chant have apologized for their actions, with one of the now-former fraternity brothers saying he had learned "a devastating lesson."

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Race
4:07 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Frat Banned At Oklahoma University Is Familiar With Controversy

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Race
4:07 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

SAE Fraternity Banned From University Of Oklahoma

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 4:56 pm

Copyright 2015 KGOU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kgou.org.

The Two-Way
12:39 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

University Of Oklahoma Expels 2 Students Seen As Leading Racist Chant

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 7:30 pm

Updated at 8:28 p.m. ET

One of the students seen in a video in which fraternity members at the University of Oklahoma chant a racist song has apologized for his actions, as have the parents of another student seen in the video.

Parker Rice, one of the students, apologized in a statement published by the Dallas Morning News. He called his actions "wrong and reckless."

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Code Switch
8:03 am
Tue March 10, 2015

Photos: From Grace Jones to Toni Morrison, Little Girl Dresses Up Like Black Heroines

Lily Bushelle, 5, as Toni Morrison.
Courtesy of Marc Bushelle

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 3:49 pm

While surfing the Web one day, Janine Harper came across a project where a photographer had taken pictures of her daughter dressed up as famous women, including Coco Chanel and Amelia Earhart. Harper showed the project to her husband, photographer Marc Bushelle, and together they thought it would be wonderful to adapt it for their 5-year-old daughter, Lily. Their goal was to create a fun learning method for Lily so that she could start to "see herself in the story" of black history.

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NPR Story
4:08 am
Tue March 10, 2015

Oklahoma University Cuts Ties With Fraternity After Racist Video Posted

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 4:55 pm

Copyright 2015 KGOU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kgou.org.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
11:03 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

The Numbers Add Up To This: Less And Less Opportunity For Poor Kids

An employee at the American Disposables Inc. factory works on the assembly line in October 2009 in Ware, Mass. The state has seen rapidly expanding income disparity in the past 50 years as highly educated tech and financial workers have seen big gains and inflation-adjusted income has shrunk for the poorest residents.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 12:57 pm

In this country, all children are supposed to have a shot at success — a chance to jump "from rags to riches" in one generation.

Even if riches remain out of reach, then the belief has been that every hard-working American should be able to go from poverty to the middle class.

On Tuesday, a book and a separate study are being released — both turning up evidence that the one-generation leap is getting harder to accomplish in an economy so tied to education, technological know-how and networking.

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NPR Ed
12:03 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Math Love, Game-Based Learning, And More From NPR Ed At #SXSWEdu

Sarah Hagan, a young algebra teacher in Oklahoma oil country, will be joining us at SXSW Edu to talk about her unorthodox approach to classroom math.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

It's not quite as glamorous as the way our colleagues at NPR Music do it, but this week, the NPR Ed team will be heading down to Austin, Texas for the South By Southwest Edu conference.

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NPR Ed
9:09 am
Mon March 9, 2015

The Teacher Who Believes Math Equals Love

For her trigonometry class, Sarah Hagan (center) uses everything but the kitchen sink: a flower pot, garbage basket, rolls of tape, rubber balls, even loose spaghetti.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Mon March 9, 2015 7:07 pm

What makes a great teacher great? That's the question at the heart of 50 Great Teachers, from the NPR Ed Team.

Sarah Hagan has a passion for math, and the pi-shaped pendant to prove it.

The 25-year-old teaches at Drumright High School in Drumright, Okla. The faded oil town is easy to miss. Fewer than 3,000 people live there, and the highway humps right around it.

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The Howard Project
8:41 am
Sun March 8, 2015

Education May Be Priceless, But A College Degree Isn't

"The Howard Project" participants Kevin Peterman (top left), Leighton Watson, Ariel Alford (bottom left) and Taylor Davis, shown in the Howard University library, are offering insights into their thoughts and fears as they approach the end of the senior year.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun March 8, 2015 12:08 pm

Paying for college gets more expensive every year.

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Americans owe more than a trillion dollars in outstanding student loan payments.

The result can be a lot of pressure for college grads. The four seniors participating in our Howard Project — Ariel Alford, Taylor Davis, Leighton Watson and Kevin Peterman — talk to us about finances.

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Around the Nation
7:53 am
Sun March 8, 2015

Learning The Hard Truth About Lying

Marilee Jones, former MIT dean of admissions and now a college admissions consultant.
Courtesy Marilee Jones

Originally published on Sun March 8, 2015 12:08 pm

We all lie sometimes. But if you're in the public eye, the lie can take on a life of its own.

NBC's Brian Williams became the victim of his own story last month, exaggerating the danger he faced while reporting in Iraq in 2003. It lead to an on-air mea culpa and a temporary suspension from the anchor desk.

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NPR Ed
11:23 am
Sat March 7, 2015

There Are Fewer New Teachers. And No One Seems Surprised.

LA Johnson/NPR

Earlier this week we reported on the decline in teachers entering the profession.

And the responses from social media poured in.

From Facebook

From Twitter

From Instagram

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NPR Ed
9:08 am
Fri March 6, 2015

The School Where Everyone Fills Out The FAFSA

For the past two years, Chicago college and career coach Alana Mbanza has raffled off tickets to prom for students who've submitted their FAFSA.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Fri March 6, 2015 6:38 pm

All this week we've been talking about the importance of applying for financial aid, the difficulty of doing so and what can be done to make it simpler.

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Education Desk
6:28 am
Fri March 6, 2015

House Speaker Creates School Funding Task Force

Credit Dan LoGrasso / WUIS

 Illinois' longtime House speaker is forming a bipartisan task force to examine a way to fix the state's  school funding formula.  

Michael J. Madigan's office announced Thursday the panel would include lawmakers from various regions of the state. It's scheduled to meet for the first time next Wednesday in Springfield.  

The last major school funding formula overhaul took place in 1997. While there's wide agreement the current formula doesn't effectively distribute state dollars to students across the state, how it should be changed remains under debate.  

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NPR Ed
4:22 pm
Thu March 5, 2015

Why Some Parents Are Sitting Kids Out Of Tests

GIRLRAY Flickr

Originally published on Mon March 9, 2015 11:07 am

Meet Jenni Hofschulte, the 35-year-old mom who's one of the parents leading the charge against testing in Milwaukee.

"I have two children in Milwaukee Public Schools," Hofschulte says over coffee at a cafe near her home. "The oldest one is in eighth grade." She's interrupted by her fidgety 4-year-old son, Lachlan.

Hofschulte quiets him down, furrows her brow and begins again.

Hofschulte says that when she found out her son would have to take a diagnostic test next year that's required of all Wisconsin kindergartners, all kinds of red flags went up.

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Code Switch
11:59 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Why Is Milwaukee So Bad For Black People?

Milwaukee, Wis., lags behind in educating black children, incarcerates the most black men and is ranked one of the worst states to live for African-Americans.
Morry Gash AP

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 5:06 pm

A new report from UCLA finds that K-12 schools in Wisconsin suspend black high school students at a higher rate than anywhere else in the country and has the second-highest disparity in suspension rates between white and black students.

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