Education Desk

Education
7:56 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Students Push College Fossil Fuel Divestment To Stigmatize Industry

Alumnus Will Lawrence of the Fossil Fuel Divestment Student Network came back to Swarthmore to help the students effectively communicate their protest to the school's administrators.
Emily Cohen NewsWorks

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 9:54 am

In the past few years, students at hundreds of colleges and universities have started pushing their schools to divest from fossil fuel companies as a way to slow climate change.

The campaign has had some notable wins in the past year. But at tiny Swarthmore College, outside of Philadelphia, where the movement was born, students have been staging a sit-in for nearly a month to try to make their voices heard.

Read more
NPR Ed
6:03 am
Sat April 11, 2015

New Research Shows Free Online Courses Didn't Grow As Expected

Student Raul Ramos goes through his online homework during a session of a massive open online class, or MOOC, in Madrid, Spain.
Andres Kudacki AP

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 11:02 am

Remember the MOOC?

Just a few years ago, the Massive Open Online Course was expected to reinvent higher education. Millions of people were signing up to watch Web-based, video lectures from the world's great universities. Some were completing real assignments, earning certificates and forming virtual study groups — all for free.

Surely the traditional college degree would instantly collapse.

Read more
All Tech Considered
5:55 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

More Black, Latino Teens Say They're Online 'Almost Constantly'

About one-third of black and Hispanic teens say they're online just about all the time, compared with about 1 in 5 whites, a new study says.
27 Studios/Getty Images

Boys like Facebook, girls like Instagram. Wealthier kids Snapchat. Lower income kids Facebook. And somehow Google+ is still relevant.

So says the Pew Research Center's latest study, "Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015," in which we officially learn that teenagers spend as much time online as adults think they do:

  • 92 percent of teens report going online daily.
  • 24 percent say they go online "almost constantly."
Read more
Goats and Soda
2:49 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Dear World, Your Grade For Educating Your Children Is ...

India is definitely making progress in getting more kids into school. This facility is in Bhubaneswar.
Biswaranjan Rout AP

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 4:19 pm

It seems like a simple goal: All kids should go to primary school.

People began talking about it in the 1960s. And they kept talking about it. "Everyone thought it was pretty doable; it wasn't too big of a deal," recalls Aaron Benavot, director of UNESCO's Education for All Global Monitoring Report.

But for lots of reasons — cutbacks on government spending, no schoolhouse within an easy commute — it just wasn't happening. So in 2000, 164 nations got together and pledged "Education For All" by 2015.

Read more
NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu April 9, 2015

A Classic Prep For Parenthood, But Is The Egg All It's Cracked Up To Be?

Egg babies created by Aaron Warren's ninth-grade students at Orthopaedic Hospital Medical Magnet High School in Los Angeles.
Courtesy of Aaron Warren

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 2:40 pm

For the series Tools of the Trade we've been thinking a lot about the iconic tools that some of us remember using — if only for a short time — in our early schooling.

Read more
NPR Ed
11:26 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Think Tuition Is Rising Fast? Try Room And Board

Universities can have a hard time resisting the lure of luxury, which keeps room and board prices rising.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 4:46 pm

Valerie Inniss took out $11,500 in student loans this year to pay for the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

None of it was for tuition.

The 21-year-old is on a four-year, full-tuition scholarship, won on the strength of her high school test scores. And she qualifies for the maximum federal Pell Grant — $5,730 — for low-income students.

Read more
The Salt
3:36 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Aspiring Craft Brewers Hit The Books To Pick Up Science Chops

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 11:20 am

Here's how popular craft brewed beer is these days: On average, a new brewery opens its doors every single day in the the U.S.

Read more
Education
2:48 am
Wed April 8, 2015

States Review Laws Revoking Licenses For Student Loan Defaults

In 22 states, people who default on their student loans can have professional licenses suspended or revoked. The percentage of Americans who default on student loans has more than doubled since 2003.
Butch Dill AP

Originally published on Wed April 8, 2015 5:21 pm

Clementine Lindley says she had a great college experience, but if she had it to do over again, she probably wouldn't pick an expensive private school.

"I could actually buy a small home in Helena, Mont., with the amount of debt that I graduated with," she says.

Fresh out of school, Lindley says there were times when she had to decide whether to pay rent, buy food or make her student loan payments.

"There was a time where I defaulted on my student loans enough that I never was sent to collections, but just long enough to, honestly, ruin my credit."

Read more
NPR Ed
1:33 pm
Tue April 7, 2015

Mexican-American Toddlers: Understanding The Achievement Gap

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 11:56 am

Mexican-American toddlers born in the U.S. do not develop nearly as fast as white toddlers when it comes to language and pre-literacy skills. That's the main finding of a new study by the Institute of Human Development at the University of California, Berkeley.

Read more
NPR Ed
2:23 am
Tue April 7, 2015

A New Orleans High School Adapts To Unaccompanied Minors

G.W. Carver Preparatory Academy has enrolled more than 50 unaccompanied minors from Central America. Principal Ben Davis says he's spending an extra $2,500 per student for special education services and instructional software tailored for them.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 2:03 pm

For the past year now, many Americans have been hearing and reading about the 68,000 unaccompanied minors who have crossed illegally into the U.S. Nearly all of these minors come from El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras, and since their arrival, immigration officials have released most of them to their parents or relatives who already live in this country.

A number of these children and teenagers are in deportation proceedings, but while they wait, they have been allowed to attend public schools. In Louisiana, schools have enrolled nearly 2,000 of them.

Read more
Michel Martin, Going There
2:21 am
Tue April 7, 2015

New Orleans Educator Dreams Of Teaching Tech To Beat The Streets

New Orleans educator Jonathan Johnson is founder and CEO of the Rooted School.
Jonathan Johnson

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 4:49 pm

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, much has been rebuilt in New Orleans — including the public schools. But the current education system is radically different from the one that people who grew up in New Orleans remember. Virtually all students in the city now attend charter schools. Many of their teachers are both new to New Orleans and new to teaching.

Read more
U.S.
5:07 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

Report Shreds 'Rolling Stone' Rape Story, But Many On Campus Have Moved On

An independent review of a Rolling Stone article about an alleged rape at the University of Virginia found fundamental errors in the way the story was reported and edited. University President Teresa Sullivan said the story had damaged campus efforts to address sexual assault.
Zach Gibson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 12:49 pm

A report released Sunday about a Rolling Stone magazine story detailing an alleged rape at the University of Virginia is one more chapter in a long, troubling story for the campus.

Read more
Media
4:14 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

'Rolling Stone' Rape Story Report Details 'Systemic Failing' By Magazine

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 6:48 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Goats and Soda
4:00 pm
Mon April 6, 2015

'Visibly Pregnant' Girls Are Banned From School In Sierra Leone

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 10:36 am

Across Sierra Leone, students are preparing to return to school April 14, after nine months off because of the Ebola epidemic. But one group has been banned from returning, according to a new decree by the minister of education: "visibly pregnant" girls.

Minister of Education Minkailu Bah announced the ban last week, explaining that "innocent girls" could be negatively affected by their pregnant peers. The ban would prevent seniors from taking the exams needed to graduate and attend college.

Read more
NPR Ed
11:19 am
Mon April 6, 2015

In New Orleans, The Scramble For The Right Fit

In New Orleans, advertisements for charter schools — and for the annual Schools Expo — appear on billboards and bus stops.
Mallory Falk WWNO

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 2:01 pm

It's a Saturday morning, and school marching bands are playing for a crowd. But they're not in a Mardi Gras parade. They're in the Superdome, where 120 schools are set up at long tables, putting their best faces forward and trying to recruit families.

One gives on-the-spot instrument lessons, another is showing off it's step team.

Read more
NPR Ed
7:45 pm
Sat April 4, 2015

Without Janitors, Students Are In Charge Of Keeping School Shipshape

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon April 6, 2015 4:21 pm

Back in 2011, Newt Gingrich was running for president, and he proposed a radical idea to help schools cut costs: Fire the janitors and pay students to do the cleaning.

Needless to say, the idea to turn students into moonlighting janitors had about as much support as Gingrich's presidential campaign.

Read more
Code Switch
3:23 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Proposals To Diversify NYC's Top High Schools Would Do Little To Help, Study Finds

Black and Latino students make up around 70 percent of the student population of New York City's public schools, but makeup a tiny percentage at the city's three elite specialized high schools.
New York City Department of Education

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 6:44 pm

New York City's public school system is vast, with more than a million students spread across thousands of schools. And like the city itself, it's remarkably diverse — about 15 percent Asian, just under 30 percent black, about 40 percent Latino, and about 15 percent white, with all sorts of finer shadings of ethnicity, nationality and language in that mix.

Read more
NPR Ed
10:59 am
Fri April 3, 2015

The Value Of Wild, Risky Play: Fire, Mud, Hammers And Nails

The Land adventure playground is situated in a neighborhood that allows the staff to get to know the children well. Playworker Dave Bullough supervises a fire that Corey has built.
Courtesy of Erin Davis

Part of our ongoing series of conversations with thinkers and activists on education issues

Filmmaker and radio producer Erin Davis' new short documentary shares its name with an adventure playground in North Wales called The Land. As Davis puts it, the film explores the "nature of play, risk and hazard" — issues I explored last summer in a story on the decline and fall of wild play.

Read more
NPR Ed
1:43 pm
Thu April 2, 2015

Why Babies Love (And Learn From) Magic Tricks

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University set out to study how infants use what they already know to motivate future learning.
Len Turner, Dave Schmelick and Deirdre Hammer/Johns Hopkins University Office of Communications

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 6:27 pm

To survive, we humans need to be able to do a handful of things: breathe, of course. And drink and eat. Those are obvious.

We're going to focus now on a less obvious — but no less vital — human function: learning. Because new research out today in the journal Science sheds light on the very building blocks of learning.

Read more
Education
10:39 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Chartered Waters: A Live Event From NPR Presents And WWNO

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 5:28 pm

MICHEL MARTIN EXAMINES THE NEW ORLEANS SCHOOL SYSTEM ON APRIL 21

Read more
NPR Story
4:16 am
Thu April 2, 2015

11 Ex-Atlanta Public School Employees Found Guilty In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 9:08 am

Copyright 2015 WABE-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wabe.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Higher Education
9:34 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Chancellor: Positive Changes Coming To UIS

Credit UIS.EDU

Despite concerns over state funding, there is reason for optimism at the University of Illinois Springfield.  In the first part of our interview, Chancellor Susan Koch told us about planning that is underway for a likely reduction in funding.

But there's also a bright side at UIS.   The campus has all time high enrollment and many other positive changes are coming.  A new nursing program will launch this fall and ground will soon be broken on a Student Union.   

Read more
Law
3:39 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Verdict Reached In Atlanta School Cheating Case

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 7:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
The Two-Way
1:51 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

11 Former Atlanta Public School Employees Found Guilty In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 2:22 pm

Eleven of 12 former public school employees in Atlanta were found guilty of racketeering in what is thought to be the biggest cheating scandal in American education, NPR member station WABE reports.

One defendant, teacher Dessa Curb, was acquitted of all charges, according to WSB-TV's Richard Elliot.

Read more
NPR Ed
4:30 am
Wed April 1, 2015

The Opposite Of The Dean's List

The Education Department, headed by Secretary Arne Duncan, says it's keeping a close eye on 556 colleges and universities that do a poor job of complying with federal regulations and handling federal financial aid.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 4:22 pm

No school wants to be on this list.

It was just released by the Department of Education. On it are the names of 556 colleges and universities that failed the department's "financial responsibility test."

Undersecretary of Education Ted Mitchell says that each school's finances are now being placed under a microscope because the government "had serious concerns about the financial integrity of the institution or its administrative capacity."

Read more
Noteworthy
12:00 am
Wed April 1, 2015

North America’s Largest Collection Of South Asian Comic Books At UIUC

Librarian Mara Thacker
Credit L. Brian Stauffer / University of Illinois news bureau

In 2012, a librarian at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign approached Mara Thacker, South-Asian studies librarian, with a question. David Ward had been building the collection of comic books and graphic novels and asked for recommendations to expand the collection into foreign comics. Already a fan of Indian popular culture, Thacker suggested comics from India and its neighbors.

Read more
Illinois Issues - Education Desk
12:00 am
Wed April 1, 2015

Now A Necessity

School Districts Throughout Illinois Are Creating Foundations To Fill In Budget Gaps

Every spring, the students at Mount Carmel High School in Wabash County put on a musical. They’ve done The Music Man, Oklahoma!, The Wizard of Oz, Beauty and the Beast — and  every show has sold out. 

For Kim Mandrell, music director at MCHS, selling out was both good news and bad news. The school’s auditorium was built in 1963, and its wooden seats were crumbling. 

Read more
Higher Education
9:37 pm
Tue March 31, 2015

UIS Chancellor: Higher Ed "Between A Rock And A Hard Place" Financially

University of Illinois Springfield Chancellor Susan Koch says if a proposed 31% state budget cut to higher education occurs, it would hamper the school's ability to carry out its mission. 

"It would be severely damaging," Koch said.  She added she is hopeful the eventual budget won't hit UIS so hard.  But she also expects less state support in the coming year.

"The reality is at this point we don't know where things will end up."

Read more
NPR Ed
4:38 pm
Tue March 31, 2015

Activists Stop Paying Their Student Loans

Makenzie Vasquez (from left), Pamala Hunt, Latonya Suggs, Ann Bowers, Nathan Hornes, Ashlee Schmidt, Natasha Hornes, Tasha Courtright, Michael Adorno and Sarah Dieffenbacher are refusing to pay back loans they took out to attend Corinthian Colleges.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 10:03 am

Latonya Suggs says she borrowed thousands of dollars in student loans to attend the for-profit Corinthian Colleges but has nothing to show for it. Most employers don't recognize her criminal justice degree.

"I am completely lost and in debt," Suggs says. And now she's doing something about it: She's refusing to pay back those loans.

Suggs and 106 other borrowers now saddled with Corinthian loan debt say their refusal to repay the loans is a form of political protest. And Tuesday, the U.S. government gave them an audience.

Read more
Education
3:46 pm
Tue March 31, 2015

Students From Troubled For-Profit Colleges Refuse To Pay Back Loans

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 1:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more

Pages