Education Desk

NPR Ed
4:43 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

The Largest For-Profit College Shutdown In History

Corinthian operated colleges and training programs under the names Everest College, Heald, WyoTech and QuickStart Intelligence. This location is in Milwaukee.
Jeramey Jannene Flickr

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 4:47 pm

The long-running story of the for-profit Corinthian Colleges has entered what looks like a final phase. As our colleagues at SCPR wrote:

"Corinthian Colleges will shut down all of its remaining 28 ground campuses, displacing about 16,000 students, less than two weeks after the U.S. Department of Education announced it was fining the for-profit institution $30 million for misrepresentation."

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NPR Ed
4:09 am
Mon April 27, 2015

In Texas, Questions About Prosecuting Truancy

Edgar Ramirez, 17, and his mother, Alma, appear before Judge Williams.
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 12:31 pm

As long as there have been schools and classes, there have been students who don't show up. And educators scratching their heads over what to do about it.

In most states, missing a lot of school means a trip to the principal's office. In Texas, parents and students are more likely to end up in front of a judge.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Sun April 26, 2015

What If Students Could Fire Their Professors?

LA Johnson/NPR

"Welcome to Iowa State University. May I take your paper, please?"

A bill circulating in the Iowa state Senate would rate professors' performance based on student evaluations. Just student evaluations.

Low-rated professors would be automatically fired β€” no tenure, no appeals.

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Education Desk
11:59 am
Fri April 24, 2015

There's More Than One Way To Skin A School Budget

These students are pictured on Cairo School District's website.

I should begin with a word of warning: This story contains several F-words -- and by that, I mean facts, figures and school funding formulas. These have been known to befuddle the very state officials in charge of understanding this stuff. For example, here’s Curt Bradshaw, a third-year member of the Illinois State Board of Education (commonly referred to as ISBE), thinking out loud at the last board meeting:Β 

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TED Radio Hour
8:49 am
Fri April 24, 2015

How Can Kids Help Parents Manage Their Family?

"[The family is] like a startup β€” where basically everybody has to contribute, you have to adapt all the time, you need some order, but you've got to keep moving forward." β€” Bruce Feiler
Courtesy Of TED

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Getting Organized

About Bruce Feiler's TED Talk

Parents help their kids manage their lives. But according to Bruce Feiler, it can work the other way around. It just takes a little insight drawn from Japanese computer programming principles.

About Bruce Feiler

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NPR Ed
8:28 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Uncomfortable Conversations: Talking About Race In The Classroom

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:21 am

Open up the newspaper or turn on the news these days, and you'll find plenty of talk about race and racism. But it's a different story in many classrooms.

Some teachers don't consider race germane to their math or English syllabus. Others strive for colorblindness in the classroom, wanting to believe we live in a post-racial society. Unfortunately, says H. Richard Milner, we don't.

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Goats and Soda
1:16 pm
Thu April 23, 2015

She Got 80,000 Girls To Attend School And Won A $1.25 Million Prize

Safeena Husain says: "I educate girls." Her efforts have brought 80,000 Indian girls into school; last week she received a Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship (above).
Courtesy of Skoll Foundation/Gabriel Diamond

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:07 am

Have you ever had an "aha" moment? Suddenly, it becomes clear you have to make a change in your life, and you actually go ahead and do it.

Safeena Husain, 43, has had three "aha" moments. She ran away from home in India to an ashram. She let her fingers do the walking through the Yellow Pages to plot a new career in the U.S. And she found her true calling after a soul-shaking encounter in a Himalayan village.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Thu April 23, 2015

To Get More Students Through College, Give Them Fewer Choices

Redesigning America's Community Colleges: A Clearer Path to Student Success by Thomas R. Bailey, Shanna Smith Jaggars and Davis Jenkins
Harvard University Press

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 10:18 am

How many different flavors of jam do you need to be happy?

In 2000, a famous experiment showed that when people were presented with a supermarket sampler of 24 exotic fruit flavors, they were more attracted to the display. But, when the sample included only six flavors, they were 10 times more likely to actually buy.

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NPR Ed
11:03 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Could It Be? Researchers Find A Hiring Bias That Favors Women

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 2:14 pm

Think, for just a moment, about the last job you applied for.

If you didn't get the job (apologies), did you get an interview? If not, did you feel some hidden forces, beyond your control, working against you?

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NPR Ed
4:47 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Teaching Students To Hear The Music In The Built World

Architecture professor Diana Agrest evaluates her students' work during a class critique at Cooper Union in New York.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 8:31 am

What makes a great teacher great? That's the question at the heart of 50 Great Teachers, from the NPR Ed Team.

Diana Agrest believes architecture is so much more than a marriage of form and function. For more than four decades, she's been trying to get her students to believe that too.

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NPR Ed
11:03 am
Tue April 21, 2015

On The High School Diploma: A 'Bilingual' Stamp Of Approval?

LA Johnson/NPR

In the 1920s, Aurora Orozco crossed over from Mexico to Texas β€” a child of African descent who spoke not a word of English. She was an uneasy transplant.

Many years later, in an essay published in 1999, she recalled attitudes towards students who were caught speaking Spanish in school: "My teacher, Mrs. White, would make me stay after class. With a red rubber band, she would hit my poor hands until they nearly bled."

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Michel Martin, Going There
6:03 am
Tue April 21, 2015

What Can #NOLASCHOOLS Teach Us?

Teacher Towana Pierre-Floyd in her classroom at New Orleans West in 2005. It's a structured charter school set up for students and teachers displaced by the storm.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 9:38 pm

What if you had to start your school system over almost from scratch? What if most of the buildings were unusable, and most of the teachers had left or been fired? Is that a nightmare, or your dream come true?

In New Orleans, that was the reality after the flooding that followed Hurricane Katrina. That set off a chain reaction that transformed the city's schools forever, first by a state takeover and then by the most extensive charter school system in the country.

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Business
5:23 am
Tue April 21, 2015

Universities Target MBA Programs Toward Professional Athletes

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 2:07 pm

Copyright 2015 WLRN Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wlrn.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:01 am
Mon April 20, 2015

New York Teen Gets Accepted To All Ivy League Schools

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:49 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
3:31 am
Mon April 20, 2015

Anti-Test 'Opt-Out' Movement Makes A Wave In New York State

A school bus passes a sign encouraging parents to have their children opt out of state tests in Rotterdam, N.Y.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 8:25 am

Across New York state this week, some students are refusing to take a test, and they're not getting punished for it. The test is a Common Core-aligned, federally mandated exam, and students, parents and educators are part of what they're calling the opt-out movement.

Opt-outs made news last week in several states: Colorado, Florida, Oregon, Maine, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, to name a few. The objections are similar everywhere. But no state is posting numbers like New York.

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The Howard Project
7:15 am
Sun April 19, 2015

Howard Seniors Look Back On The Soundtrack To Their College Years

This week on The Howard Project, Ariel, Kevin, Taylor and Leighton talk about the soundtrack of their college years.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 10:00 am

The class of 2015 is nearing graduation. For students at Howard University in Washington, D.C., that day is May 9.

Seniors are excited β€” and they are getting antsy.

NPR's Weekend Edition has been following four of those seniors all semester: Taylor Davis, Ariel Alford, Kevin Peterman, and Leighton Watson.

This week, the four joined NPR's Rachel Martin in our D.C. studios to talk about the songs that have formed the soundtrack to their college years.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Sat April 18, 2015

Falling Through The Cracks: Young Lives Adrift In New Orleans

Craig Adams, Jr., 18, is studying for his second try at the high school equivalency exam.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 9:37 am

On weekend afternoons, Craig Adams Jr. plays for tourists on the streets of the French Quarter.

He gigs with different bands, bringing whatever's needed: trumpet, trombone, saxophone β€” he plays six or seven instruments in all. There's a white plastic bucket on the sidewalk so people can drop in cash as they browse the T-shirts and Mardi Gras masks.

Craig is 18, and there's music in his blood: "I had my uncle, my grandfather, and my dad to teach me." His father, Craig Adams Sr., leads a group called the Higher Dimensions of Praise Gospel Band.

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NPR Ed
3:34 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

In New Orleans, A Second-Chance School Tries Again

Students arrive at CLA. More than half end up here after being expelled from other schools, usually for fighting, weapons or drugs.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 7:28 pm

Principal Nicholas Dean looks at his scarred, broken office door with resignation.

"Time to get a new lock," he says.

Over the weekend, a person or persons smashed into his office, found the keys to the school van and drove off in it.

It's another day at Crescent Leadership Academy, one of New Orleans' three second-chance schools for students who have not been successful elsewhere.

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NPR Ed
3:44 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

LA Schools To Apple: You Owe Us

Jorge Quinteros Flickr

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 7:29 pm

The Los Angeles Unified School District is demanding that Apple Inc. refund millions of dollars for Pearson software that had been loaded onto iPads for the district's 650,000 students.

If an agreement on the dispute cannot be reached, the nation's second-largest school district could take Apple to court.

Two years after the district launched the most expansive school technology initiative in the country, its attorney said it is "extremely dissatisfied" with the work of Pearson, the publisher of the Common Core learning software.

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NPR Ed
11:03 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Real-World Math: A Bit Of Trig And Hay For The Horses

With the math done, student Kendall Hood works the plasma cutter.
Jenny Brundin Colorado Public Radio

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:52 pm

Building a giant steel bale feeder is hard. Try it.

Problem No. 1: Unless you live in ranch country, you probably don't even know what it's supposed to look like β€” regardless of whether you can build one.

Problem No. 2: Arc welding is involved.

Problem No. 3: Getting it right requires some serious math.

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NPR Story
4:10 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Educators Sentenced To Jail In Atlanta Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Parallels
2:34 am
Wed April 15, 2015

The All-Work, No-Play Culture Of South Korean Education

Students take the annual College Scholastic Ability Test, or college entrance exam, at a high school in Seoul last November. Students face enormous pressure to do well on the test and get into a top university. Airplanes are grounded on the day of the test so they won't disturb the students.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 2:39 pm

In South Korea, grim stories of teen suicide come at a regular clip. Recently, two 16-year-old girls in the city of Daejeon jumped to their deaths, leaving a note saying, "We hate school."

It's just one tragedy in a country where suicide is the leading cause of death among teens, and 11- to 15-year-olds report the highest amount of stress out of 30 developed nations.

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Law
3:21 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Atlanta Educators Handed Sentences In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:52 am

In a fiery sentencing hearing Tuesday, a judge in Atlanta lashed out at some of the 10 former educators convicted in a grade-changing scandal. Prosecutors offered reduced sentences in exchange for apologies, but most of the former educators chose not to do that and received lengthy prison terms.

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NPR Ed
11:00 am
Tue April 14, 2015

If Walls Could Talk: What Lead Is Doing To Our Students

Peeling lead paint in a New York City apartment. Many buildings built before 1960 still have high amounts of lead.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:04 pm

Every child's ability to succeed in school is influenced by lots of external factors: teacher quality, parenting, poverty, geography, to name a few. But far less attention has been paid to the power of a child's bedroom walls. Or, rather, the paint that's on them and the lead that may be in that paint.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Jail Terms Handed To Most Atlanta Teachers Convicted In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 7:53 pm

Updated at 12:25 p.m. ET

Two of the 10 former Atlanta public school employees convicted this month of conspiring to cheat on state tests to earn raises and bonuses took plea deals Tuesday while the others received jail time of between one and seven years.

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Education Desk
6:02 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Plan That Would Allow Ex-Felons To Work In Schools Gets Support From Conservatives

State Rep. Kelly Cassidy (D-Chicago)
Credit Illinois General Assembly

Β 

Current state law prohibits people with felony records from working in a school, or volunteering, or even driving a truck that makes deliveries to a school. But a measure pending before the Illinois House of Representatives could change that.

State Representative Kelly Cassidy β€” a Chicago Democrat β€” sponsors the legislation.

"What we operate under now is based on the assumption that someone with a criminal history is always a criminal, and never eligible to return to productive society,” she says.

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Politics
5:13 am
Tue April 14, 2015

Senate Attempts To Revise No Child Left Behind Measure

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 7:01 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Environment
3:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Harvard Students Block Campus Building To Push Fossil Fuel Divestment

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 1:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Student activists are demonstrating in Harvard Yard, demanding that the world's wealthiest university sell its shares in big oil and coal companies. From member station WGBH, Kirk Carapezza reports.

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Law
3:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Sentencing Begins For Atlanta Teachers Convicted In Cheating Scandal

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 6:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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NPR Ed
3:56 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Senators Try To Revise No Child Left Behind β€” A Few Years Behind

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the ESEA in 1965 with Kate Deadrich Loney, his first schoolteacher.
Yoichi Okamoto LBJ Presidential Library

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 6:53 pm

News flash: Members of the U.S. Senate will work across party lines Tuesday for the sake of America's students.

Well, at least for a few more days.

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