Education Desk

NPR Ed
3:09 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Teacher Tenure Lawsuits Spread From California To New York

Campbell Brown of the Partnership for Educational Justice, with plaintiffs in their New York teacher tenure lawsuit.
Gwynne Hogan WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 6:40 pm

Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.?

That question is at the center of the heated debate about teacher tenure. In New York today, a group of parents and advocates, led by former CNN and NBC anchor Campbell Brown, filed a suit challenging state laws that govern when teachers can be given tenure and how they can be fired once they have it.

As WNYC reported, Brown announced the suit on the steps of City Hall:

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Education
3:09 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Teacher Tenure Fight Spills Into N.Y., Where A New Lawsuit Brews

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 6:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Higher Ed
3:10 am
Mon July 28, 2014

UIS Enforcing Campus Housing Requirement

Credit Kaitie Devlin/WUIS

About two years ago, the University of Illinois Springfield had decided to make a new mandate for student housing. The rule entailed that both honor and traditional students must live on campus for their 1st and 2nd year of schooling. Even though the rule was made two years ago, the regulation was not implemented on campus, until now.

With the cost of housing along with more incoming students and their parents wanting to save money, could this requirement really be worth it in the long run?

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Men In America
4:17 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

Lessons In Manhood: A Boys' School Turns Work Into Wonders

At East Bay School for Boys, sometimes the sparks of inspiration result in, well, actual sparks.
Courtesy East Bay School for Boys

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 6:22 pm

This summer, All Things Considered has been taking a look at the changing lives of men in America. And that means talking about how the country educates boys.

In Berkeley, Calif., a private, non-profit middle school called the East Bay School for Boys is trying to reimagine what it means to build confident young men. In some ways, the school's different approach starts with directing, not stifling, boys' frenetic energy.

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Education
4:14 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

Veterans Advocacy Group Puts Corinthian Colleges On Blacklist

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 5:52 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
8:08 am
Sat July 26, 2014

Learning To Read May Take Longer Than We Thought

Most of what we know — or think we know — about how kids learn comes from classroom practice and behavioral psychology. Now, neuroscientists are adding to and qualifying that store of knowledge by studying the brain itself. The latest example: new research in the journal Developmental Science suggests a famous phenomenon known as the "fourth-grade shift" isn't so clear-cut.

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Politics
3:15 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Army War College Opens A Probe Into Sen. Walsh's Alleged Plagiarism

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 6:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Education
11:28 am
Fri July 25, 2014

Before Passing The Baton, Spelman President Reflects On Tough Choices

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Fri July 25, 2014

Thanks For Your Support. We'll Take It From Here

One of the questions we're most frequently asked on the NPR Ed team is, essentially, "Don't you guys get a lot of money from the Gates Foundation?"
The answer is, of course, yes.

What that question is often implying is: "Aren't you guys just a mouthpiece for the Gates Foundation's agenda?"

The answer is, of course, no.

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Education
6:13 am
Fri July 25, 2014

What A Common Core Lesson Sounds Like In A 10th-Grade English Class

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 7:14 am

Copyright 2014 Chicago Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wbez.org.

StoryCorps
4:02 am
Fri July 25, 2014

Former Student Dropped Out, But Still Appreciates A Special Teacher

Roger Alvarez (left) did not graduate from high school, despite the efforts of former teacher Antero Garcia. "I just wanted you to know," Alvarez tells him, "I always respected you. ... You looked at me and you paid attention."
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 7:14 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Ed
1:31 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Saving Lives In South Miami, One Pool At A Time

Gary Kendrick, 8, works on his freestyle stroke with help from a counselor at Ransom Everglades School. Kendrick did not know how to swim before he started lessons at the school.
Wilson Sayre WLRN

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 12:52 pm

It's hot out. The usual midday thunderstorm has just passed, and the few kids hanging out on bleachers around the pool at Miami's Ransom Everglades School finally get the go-ahead to jump in and cool off.

Eight-year-old Gary Kendrick and the others are all here for swim lessons.

"They told us to hold on to the wall and kick our feet and, like, move our arms," Kendrick says. "When I had to swim to one of the counselors, I was really swimming. I ain't even know I was moving."

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Education
3:08 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

A Bird's-Eye View On Common Core Across The Country

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 9:36 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For more on the state of play nationwide for the Common Core we're joined by Cory Turner from the NPR Ed Team. Hey there, Cory.

CORY TURNER, BYLINE: Hey, Audie.

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Education
3:08 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Glenn Beck Takes His Campaign Against Common Core To The Big Screen

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 9:36 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
1:30 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

This Aspiring Astronaut Might Be The World's Most Amazing Teen

It took 101 takes to get the right shot for Gideon Gidori's Kickstarter video. He hopes supporters will fund his flight school tuition in exchange for a secret potato salad recipe.
via Kickstarter

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 3:15 pm

At age 7, Gideon Gidori knew exactly what he wanted to be: a rocket ship pilot.

The only thing was, he was living in a tiny Tanzanian village where schools only went through grade six and books about space (or, for that matter, any books) were scarce.

But that didn't stop him. Now 15, Gidori is determined to become Tanzania's very first astronaut.

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NPR Ed
2:38 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Charter Schools, Money And Test Scores

Putting charter school research under a microscope.
Flickr

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 6:30 pm

The University of Arkansas today released what it calls a "first ever" study exploring the relationship between charter school funding and student achievement.

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Education Desk
12:22 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

With GED, Illinois Bundles Job Training

A new approach to adult education in Illinois puts GED instruction in the context of job skills, such as nursing, welding or operating a forklift.
Credit Mike Mozart (flickr.com/jeepersmedia)

Illinois is trying to expand educational opportunities for adults who didn't finish high school. That means moving beyond the GED.

The Census Bureau says average monthly earnings of a high school grad are nearly 10 percent higher than those of someone with a GED. And while a third of high school grads eventually earn a bachelor's degree, the GED number is 1 in 20.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Tue July 22, 2014

In This School, Class Is A Workshop And Experiments Are Mandatory

Haziz Self says that he's learned "what it means to live up to your principles."
Kimberly Paynter WHYY

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 7:33 pm

Imagine a school where classes are organized not by subject but by project — a school created not by administrators, but by teachers fed up with the status quo. A school where kids from a city's toughest neighborhoods are given the opportunity to experiment and the freedom to fail.

In West Philadelphia, that school is a reality. It's called The Workshop School.

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Shots - Health News
3:43 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

High-Performing Charter Schools May Improve Students' Health

Researchers are just starting to look at how school choice affects health.
romester/iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 3:47 pm

Many people are intensely interested in how publicly funded charter schools affect children, and that includes not just their academic achievement but their health.

Researchers from UCLA and the Rand Corp. wanted to know whether attending a high-performing charter school reduced the rates of risky health behaviors among low-income minority teenagers.

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Education Desk
6:47 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Houston Says District 186 Needs To Build Credibility Before Asking For Tax Hike

Credit montanapublicmedia.org

WUIS is asking the candidates for Springfield mayor to talk about education issues facing the community. Springfield Mayor Mike Houston says he's concerned that most new single family homes in the area are in suburban school districts.   He says an increase in funding for District 186 is probably needed, but says the school board needs to build credibility first.

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NPR Ed
5:55 am
Mon July 21, 2014

In Asheville, N.C., Summer Vacation Lasts Just A Few Weeks

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:48 am

It's the first day of school at Hall Fletcher Elementary in Asheville, N.C. Principal Gordon Grant stands outside in a white suit and bow tie, greeting students. The kids arrive sporting fresh haircuts and new shoes. One even wears a tutu.

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All Tech Considered
4:34 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Next To Silicon Valley, Nonprofits Draw Youth Of Color Into Tech

Taneka Armstrong, 20, is learning about different aspects of the tech industry — from coding to sales — through the nonprofit group Hack the Hood.
Aarti Shahani NPR

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 9:07 am

Twenty-year-old Taneka Armstrong wants to land a high-tech job, but her day starts at Taco Bell.

Armstrong stands behind a steel counter, making Burrito Supremes and ringing up customers. She counts pennies and quarters. She also gets orders from her bosses, who she says can be pretty condescending.

"They're just like, 'Oh, did you know that already?' Or, 'Can you do this?' " she says. "Yes, I've been doing it, for almost a year now."

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NPR Ed
9:33 am
Fri July 18, 2014

Q&A: Designing Playful Learning Spaces

Margaret Middleton, Boston Children's Museum
Courtesy of Margaret Middleton

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 1:40 pm

When we talk about playing and learning, we naturally think of children's museums. Most major cities offer some experience like this, where kids are able to get their hands dirty, and — shocking! — learn something at the same time.

The museums — at least the good ones — are always both engaging and interactive in a way that's fun for kids, but they're also fun for grown-ups too. As we've been reporting for our series on play next month, it got me wondering: What goes into creating great museum experiences, and how do designers go about them?

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NPR Ed
7:21 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Students React To The Closure Of A Giant For-Profit College

Everest Institute in Boston.
Mallory Noe-Payne WGBH

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 10:49 am

Listen to this story on Morning Edition.

After a long reign as the fastest-growing and most problematic sector in higher education, for-profit colleges are on the ropes.

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The Two-Way
5:42 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

University Of Texas Can Continue Affirmative Action, Court Rules

Last year, Bradley Poole posed for a photo at the University of Texas after becoming president of the school's Black Student Alliance.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 8:30 am

A federal appellate court in Texas has ruled that the state's flagship university can continue to use race as a factor in admissions.

"To deny UT Austin its limited use of race in its search for holistic diversity would hobble the richness of the educational experience," Judge Patrick Higginbotham wrote for a split panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

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Education
3:58 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Morals Clauses Prove Controversial For Catholic School Teachers

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 6:28 pm

Catholic schools across the U.S. are requiring teachers to sign morality clauses, which have gotten some educators fired for marrying same-sex partners. It's seen as a pushback among local church dioceses against changing state laws. As Sandhya Dirks of KALW reports, some parents are protesting the new requirements with threats to pull their students out of school.

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NPR Ed
3:15 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

For Most Kids, Nice Finishes Last

Teens say their parents are teaching them that success smells sweeter than kindness.
Flickr

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 5:24 pm

A new study holds up a mirror to America's parents. A researcher at Harvard surveyed 10,000 middle and high school students in 33 different schools around the nation about what they thought their folks cared about most: that they achieve at a high level, that they are happy (defined as "feeling good most of the time"), or that they care for others. Almost 80 percent of youth picked high achievement or happiness as their top choice, while about 20 percent selected caring for others.

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NPR Ed
4:37 am
Sat July 12, 2014

How Private Colleges Are Like Cheap Sushi

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 5:02 pm

In New York City's East Village, there are a number of hole-in-the-wall spots that advertise sushi at 50 percent off. But I can never bring myself to sample the goods. We're talking about a delicacy flown in from around the world. Marking it down drastically just doesn't sit right. Something — either the price, or the fish — has to be a little off.

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NPR Ed
7:03 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Q&A: A Union Leader On Tenure, Testing And The Common Core

Weingarten says people need to talk more about how to "attract, retain, support and nurture great teaching for kids at risk."
Shannon DeCelle AP

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 9:12 am

The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) is holding its annual convention in Los Angeles through this weekend. For the AFT's more than 3,500 national delegates descending on LA, there is a lot on their plate and big challenges ahead for the nation's second-largest teachers union: the Common Core, tenure and fierce debate about testing, to name a few.

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Education
3:59 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Washington And Lee Confronts The Weight Of Its History

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 6:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Now a story about race, history and the power of symbol. Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia, has agreed to remove Confederate flags from its Lee Chapel, responding to pressure from a group of black law school students. The chapel and the university bear the name of Confederate Army General Robert E. Lee, who became the university's president after the Civil War.

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