Code Switch

Code Switch
5:03 am
Fri May 23, 2014

'Unmosqued' Examines Muslim Variant Of Unchurched Youth

Zain Lodhia plays an original song at a Mawlid, a birthday celebration for the Prophet Muhammad. The event was sponsored by the Webb Foundation, a so-called "Third Space" Muslim faith community outside the traditional mosque.
Monique Parsons NPR

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 10:00 am

There's a new film screening on American college campuses this spring that's sparking lively debate among Muslim students. Unmosqued depicts a younger generation of American Muslims drifting away from Islam, and it argues that mosques bear the blame.

Recently several hundred people gathered at the Webb Foundation to celebrate Mawlid, the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad. The foundation is named after an early American convert to Islam. There's no dome, minaret or even a building. It's known for service projects, good Sunday schools and father-daughter camping trips.

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Games & Humor
12:25 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Does Smuggling A Cow Into School Make You A Creative Genius?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, let's take a minute to congratulate our graduating seniors. But according to our next guest, we might want to take another minute to congratulate the senior pranksters. They've been busy this year already. Students in Chandler, Ariz., managed to park several cars in the school's main hallway. This week, high school students in Northborough, Mass., brought a goat and a chicken into school in the middle of the night.

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Economy
12:25 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

In Charge Of Nearly $20 Trillion, Are Women The New Global Players?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we'd like to talk about an overlooked economic force. We are talking about women. In recent years, a lot of advocates and activists have talked about the global economic importance of educating girls and women. But there's an aspect of this that seems to have been overlooked, and that is the financial education of women.

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Around the Nation
12:25 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Poor People Can Pay Twice After Committing A Crime

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 3:43 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We turn now to an unexpected consequence of getting caught up in the justice system. By now, many people know that getting involved in a criminal proceeding can be expensive. But they're probably thinking about attorneys' fees. What you might not know about - unless you've been there - are the other fees that are increasingly being charged to defendants when they go through court or to prison or receive probation or parole.

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Health Care
12:25 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Congresswoman And Veteran 'Appalled' By VA Scandal

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
12:25 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Teenage Mischief Can Lead To Jail Time In Tennessee

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 3:58 pm

Teenagers get in trouble for skipping school, breaking curfew or buying cigarettes, but in one Tennessee county, that can mean jail. Susan Ferriss reported on this for the Center for Public Integrity.

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Code Switch
12:07 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

How To Tell Who Hasn't Read The New 'Atlantic' Cover Story

Ta-Nehisi Coates' cover story is kicking up a lot of dust in the same way several other recent much discussed Atlantic think pieces and cover stories have.
The Atlantic

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 9:34 pm

The Atlantic does this a lot: use the magazine's covers to launch large, provocative conversations that you later hear endlessly dissected on cable news, in the blogosphere, and on Twitter. It is a think piece factory.

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Code Switch
12:01 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Remembering Sam Greenlee Through His Most Famous Book

Sam Greenlee during Los Angeles Film Festival - Blaxploitation Misnomer and Misunderstood at Director's Guild of America Atrium in Los Angeles in 2004.
John Heller WireImage/Getty Images

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Code Switch
2:42 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Talking About Race And Ice Cream Leaves A Sour Taste For Some

"I am not calling for the banning of ice cream truck music, and I do not think people should boycott the ice cream industry because it plays old songs," writes Theodore R. Johnson III, explaining why it's important to examine history.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 11:11 am

Editor's Note: This post is about and contains racial slurs.

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Politics
11:12 am
Wed May 21, 2014

In Primary Races, Republicans Fight Back Tea Party

Six states held primaries on Tuesday, and the results were good for the GOP establishment. Host Michel Martin learns more about the results from NPR Politics Editor Charles Mahtesian.

Pop Culture
11:12 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Does It 'Suck To Be A Fat Girl'?

A recent episode of FX show Louie raised some controversial questions about women, weight and body image. Did the episode miss the mark? Our panel of writers and bloggers weigh in.

Asia
11:12 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Are India's Elections A Wake Up Call For The Diaspora?

An overwhelming win for India's conservative opposition party could profoundly change the direction of the world's largest democracy. But what do Indian Americans think?

Africa
11:12 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Nigerians Fear 'Things Are Falling Apart Right Before Their Eyes'

Five weeks after hundreds of Nigerian school girls were abducted by the extremist group Boko Haram, bomb blasts have hit two cities. Journalist Chika Oduah gives an update on the volatile situation.

Sports
10:45 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Can Donald Sterling Save Himself From The NBA?

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:26 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. So we have an update on a story we've been following. And at this point, Donald Sterling probably doesn't need an introduction. But just in case, he is the owner of the NBA team the LA Clippers, and he was caught on tape making racist remarks about African-Americans. He's also been sued in the past and settled complaints saying he discriminated against blacks and Latinos in renting properties that he owned.

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Parenting
10:19 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Breaking Your Kid's Picky Eating Habits

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:26 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. And today we thought we'd get some advice about food.

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Your Money
10:19 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Wait! Don't Spend That Graduation Cash Just Yet

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:26 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Let's turn now to matters of personal finance. Graduation season is here, and many newly minted graduates are hoping that there's more in those cards than the well wishes of aunts, uncles and godparents. Yes, we're talking money. There's likely to be a $20 bill or two for high school grads and, perhaps, some more serious cash for those who are finishing college or graduate school.

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Health Care
10:19 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Waiting At VA Hospitals: A Matter Of Life And Death

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:26 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. At some point, many of us have encountered a wait to see a health professional. It can be annoying and frustrating and an inconvenience. But what if it turns out that the health problem is not minor and that wait is the difference between life and death? Now, some families of veterans who waited for care from the Department of Veterans Affairs claim it was the difference between life and death.

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Ah, Commencement. Caps, Gowns And Mispronounced Names

For college grads all over the country, receiving their diploma can feel a lot like one of those trips to Starbucks where customers' names get mangled.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:10 pm

Last Friday on All Things Considered, NPR's Ted Robbins brought us a college commencement story the likes of which we hadn't heard before: the minefield that awaits the ceremony announcer when he or she is handed a list of students' names.

A list that said speaker must then read aloud.

In front of thousands of eager, excited, tuition-paying parents.

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Code Switch
2:31 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Oklahoma's Latino Community Prepares For The Next Tornado

Gloria and Francisco Sanchez stand in front of their new ranch house, still under construction a year after a tornado destroyed their last home in Moore, Okla.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 10:43 am

A devastating EF-5 tornado ripped through Moore, Okla., a year ago Tuesday. Just 11 days later, another twister ravaged the Oklahoma City metro area.

Nine of the 23 people who died as a result of the second storm were members of the local Latino community. Their deaths have sparked efforts to better prepare Hispanic families for storms.

On a windy afternoon in Oklahoma City, American Red Cross volunteer Ivelisse Cruz hands out stickers to families at the Children's Day Festival.

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Code Switch
3:17 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Lessons From A Year Of Discussing Race And Culture Online

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 4:47 pm

The experience of talking about race, ethnicity and culture on the Internet is nearly always deeply disenchanting. People don't even talk past each other; they talk right through each other. Prejudices harden. We find ourselves confirming our worst stereotypes of one another. And that's before the slurs fly.

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Code Switch
1:50 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Macklemore Plays Dress-Up And Lands In Hot Water

A costumed Macklemore performed at the opening night of an exhibition at Seattle's EMP Museum. His costume choice has become A Thing.
Suzi Pratt FilmMagic

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 12:57 am

Post Updated 1:45 a.m. ET Tuesday:

Macklemore posted an apology on his website late Monday. He said he picked out items that he could use to disguise himself so he could move freely around an event. "I wasn't attempting to mimic any culture, nor resemble one. A 'Jewish stereotype' never crossed my mind," his post reads.

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Economy
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

3 Million Young People Missing From Housing Market? It's Everyone's Problem

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Television
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

New Sitcom 'Unapologetically Embraces' Asian-American Family Life

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, I want to talk more about one of the shows that Eric just mentioned earlier a few minutes ago. It's a sitcom recently announced by ABC. It will be the first network family sitcom in two decades to feature an Asian-American cast. It's called "Fresh Off The Boat."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "FRESH OFF THE BOAT")

HUDSON YANG: (As Eddie) Me - my American dream is to fit in.

CONSTANCE WU: (As Jessica) Why do all your shirts have black men on them?

H. YANG: (As Eddie) It's Notorious B.I.G.

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Television
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

TV Networks Double Down On Diversity This Fall

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. You may have to rethink your TV-watching schedule now that most of the major networks have unveiled their new fall offerings, as well as which shows made the cut and which ones will fade to black.

Later, we will hear from writer Jeff Yang. You've heard him here, on both our Parenting and Barbershop roundtables. He's going to tell us about ABC's new show "Fresh Off The Boat" because his son is the star of the new sitcom.

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Digital Life
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

In Europe And America, New Internet Rules Up For Debate

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Switching gears now from print media to the Web. We'd like to bring you up to date on two recent developments regarding the Internet. First, Europe's higher court ruled that people can request that outdated and erroneous information about them be removed from the Web. And here in the U.S., the FCC began debate over a new set of rules called net neutrality. Both developments have advocates and critics who both say that they're concerned that they could challenge the idea of an open and accessible Internet.

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Media
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

'New York Times' Upheaval: Is This A Barack Vs. Hillary Moment?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a good chunk of the rest of the day's program talking about issues in the media that all happen to bubble up at the same time. Later, we'll talk about why the new fall season just got more colorful. We'll hear about one show that puts an Asian-American family front and center in a network sitcom for the first time in 20 years.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:21 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Six Words: 'You've Got To Be Taught' Intolerance

Actors John Kerr and France Nuyen in a scene from the 1958 film South Pacific. The interracial romance between the onstage pair unsettled some audiences.
20th Century Fox Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often, NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Code Switch
11:24 am
Sun May 18, 2014

The American Story, As It Was Reported To The Rest Of The Nation

A display of America's first ethnic newspapers at the Newseum's new exhibit, "One Nation With News For All." The exhibit opened on May 16 and runs through Jan. 5, 2015.
Jonathan Thompson/Newseum

The first draft of American history has many authors.

And they include journalists from ethnic media: newspapers, websites, radio and TV stations dedicated to reporting news for immigrant and ethnic communities.

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Code Switch
4:28 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Mirror, Mirror: Does 'Fairest' Mean Most Beautiful Or Most White?

An 1852 illustration shows Snow White's evil stepmother gazing into her magic mirror. Her famous question includes an ambiguous word: "fairest."
Project Gutenberg

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 4:41 pm

Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who's the fairest of them all?

We all recognize the mantra of Snow White's evil stepmother. But what, exactly, is she asking? In the Grimm Brothers' German original, she asks who's the most beautiful in the land. But in English, it's a little more complicated.

On the one hand, fair is an archaic word for beautiful. But in modern usage, it usually refers to a light complexion – and it's hard to forget that we're talking about a story where the main character's claim to fame is that her skin is extraordinarily pale.

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Code Switch
4:46 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Nostalgia For What's Been Lost Since 'Brown V. Board'

This racially segregated Monroe Elementary School class from March 1953 shows Linda and Terry Lynn Brown, who, with their parents, initiated the Brown v. Board of Education case that helped propel school integration.
Carl Iwasaki Getty Image

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:41 pm

Brown v. Board of Education became the law of the land when it struck down de jure segregation in Topeka, Kan., on May 17, 1954, saying, "We conclude that, in the field of public education, the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate facilities are inherently unequal."

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