Code Switch

Around the Nation
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Yuppie Condos Destroying Chinatowns?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Janet Yellen's Resume Makes Us All Feel Like 'Slackers'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes, we will talk about people and their attachment to the land in two very different places in the United States, and how that attachment to the land may be threatened.

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Politics
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Govt. Shutdown 'Wake-Up Call' To Native Americans

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. The partial government shutdown is now into its ninth day. There's no sign of a breakthrough anytime soon. So we are going to look at a number of ways the country is being affected. Later in the program, we'll speak with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax about how this stalemate is playing out with our trading partners overseas.

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Can I Just Tell You?
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Service Members Keep Promises, Even If Congress Doesn't

Pfc. Norman McQueen, U.S. Army Air Corps
photo courtesy Michel Martin

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 2:07 pm

So finally today, you might have noticed I've been out of the office a bit lately. I'm taking that trip a lot of us have, or will be taking: having to get more involved in caring for an elderly parent. And because I've been on that road, I have found myself going through old drawers and boxes in a way I had no reason or right to do before now.

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Television
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

'Raising McCain': Not Your Mother's Talk Show

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 2:30 pm

Meghan McCain comes by her maverick credentials honestly. As the daughter of Arizona Sen. John McCain, she is no stranger to the political limelight. But that doesn't mean she always agrees with her dad or Republican political orthodoxy.

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U.S.
12:50 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Property Taxes May Cause Slaves' Descendants To Lose Homes

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now to a different story about the changing face of another historic community. Sapelo Island, just off the coast of Georgia, is home to one of the few remaining Gullah Geechee enclaves. These tight knit communities in the nation's South-East trace their roots back to slavery times and share a distinct culture and dialect. But now that's being threatened by a changing economy.

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Wed October 9, 2013

A Comedy Favorite: How The 'Act Blacker' Sketch Has Evolved

Clams are her favorite thiiiiiiiiiing!
Upright Citizens Brigade

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 11:38 am

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Code Switch
5:24 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

LA Dodgers' Spark Yasiel Puig Is Lightning Rod For Criticism

Yasiel Puig (right) celebrates with teammate Brian Wilson on Monday night after the Dodgers beat the Atlanta Braves 4-3 to advance to the National League Championship Series.
Danny Moloshok AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 9:22 am

It might be the comeback of 2013. The Los Angeles Dodgers went from last place in their division four months ago to the National League Championship Series after Monday night's 4-3 win against the Atlanta Braves. And a 22-year-old Cuban defector has been credited with sparking the turnaround: No. 66, Yasiel Puig.

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Mental Health
11:09 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Mental Health Care: Why Some Get It And Some Don't

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up in money coach - look, you're a college student, you're hard-pressed for some cash and one of your classmates invites you to a, quote, amazing business opportunity. Is there a way to tell if it's the real deal and not just a scam? We'll take a closer look at some of these schemes or scams that seem to target college students in just a few minutes.

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Code Switch
5:12 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Undocumented Immigrants In Calif. Will Benefit From New Laws

California's Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law a group of bills related to immigration because, he said, enough time has passed.
AP

The federal government remains shut down over a budget stalemate, but California's Gov. Jerry Brown decided not to wait for Congress to make decisions on the Gordian knot that is U.S. immigration policy. On Saturday, Brown signed into law a group of bills related to immigration because, he said, enough time has passed.

"While Washington waffles on immigration, California's moving ahead," Brown stated. He added, with trademark bluntness, "I'm not waiting."

The "Trust Act" Vs. "Secure Communities"

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Music
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Blitz: The Ambassador Of Hip-Hop And African Music

Quazi King Blitz the Ambassador

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 12:23 pm

Rapper Blitz the Ambassador explains to Tell Me More for the occasional series "In Your Ear," that his favorite songs are the ones that helped shape his sound. "I keep these songs really close because they always remind me of where it all begins, and what makes me the artist that I am," he says.

As his name suggests, Blitz sees himself as an ambassador for Africa and hip-hop.

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Performing Arts
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

The Fat Lady Sings For New York City Opera

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. They call it The People's Opera, but after this month, the New York City Opera will exist only in the history books. The renowned company is closing after 70 years. The New York City Opera failed to raise the $7 million it needed to cover its debts and will file for bankruptcy protection.

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Arts & Life
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

An Artist's Story Of The Arab Spring

Upheaval in countries like Egypt and Syria is often discussed in political terms, but how do artists see it? Guest host Celeste Headlee talks about arts and the Arab Spring with Egyptian-American poet Yahia Lababidi and Syrian-American doctor Dr. Zaher Sahloul.

World
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Has The US Forgotten Egypt?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. We're going to spend some time talking now about Egypt, where more than 50 people were killed over the weekend in clashes between the military and supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi. In a moment, we'll speak to an Egyptian-American who has written poetry inspired by the unrest there.

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Politics
11:24 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Govt. Shutdown: Does The Minority Rule?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Coming up, diplomats around the world continue to pay close attention to the events in Syria and Iran, but one scholar explains why we shouldn't forget about Egypt. That's in a few minutes.

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NPR Story
10:54 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Pyramid Schemes: If It Looks Too Good To Be True, It Probably Is

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 11:09 am

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
10:54 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Wait, Yelling Hurts Kids?

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 11:09 am

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
10:54 am
Mon October 7, 2013

Translating Iranian Dealings, One President At A Time

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani answers a question during a news conference in New York last month.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 2:58 pm

U.S. and Iranian diplomatic relations made a big jump last month when President Obama and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani spoke directly by phone. It's the first time an American president has spoken to an Iranian leader in more than three decades. That phone call, of course, wasn't a cure-all. The U.S. and Israel remain concerned about Iran's efforts to develop a nuclear program, among other things.

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Code Switch
10:38 am
Mon October 7, 2013

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

The "boondocks" or "boonies" refers to places that are in the middle of nowhere. But few people know that the phrase was made mainstream by a fatal military training accident.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 2:16 pm

"Ugh, I have to visit my aunt out in the boondocks this weekend."

How often have you said or heard something similar? For more than half a century, Americans have used the phrase "the boondocks" or "the boonies" to indicate that a place was in the middle of nowhere. However, few people realize that the phrase is a relic of American military occupation in the Philippines, and that it was later brought to mainstream attention because of a now largely forgotten, fatal training accident on Parris Island.

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Code Switch
5:15 am
Sat October 5, 2013

'Linsanity': For Asian Fans, It Felt Just Like 'Young Love'

Jeremy Lin fans cheer during a game between the New York Knicks and Philadelphia 76ers in March 2012.
Drew Hallowell Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 5, 2013 11:44 am

Twenty months after it first took pop culture by storm, the global sports craze known as "Linsanity" has found a revival on screen.

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Code Switch
11:23 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Actors With Disabilities In Big Roles? 'We Don't Have A Chance'

The original Ironside starred Raymond Burr as a detective who became a paraplegic after being shot in the line of duty.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 5:19 pm

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Barbershop
10:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

New York Road Rage Video Raises Difficult Questions

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Race
10:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Will Settlement Bring Black Farmers Dignity?

After years of discrimination from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, black farmers are now getting a $1.25 billion settlement. Founder and president of the National Black Farmers Association John Boyd tells host Michel Martin what this settlement means for farmers and their families.

Politics
10:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

Government Shutdown? 'This Is Democracy In Action'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. After decades of litigation, checks are going out this week to thousands of black farmers who - lawmakers eventually agreed - faced discrimination by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We'll speak with one of the people who helped lead the fight for years, even though he will not personally benefit. That's in just a few minutes.

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Movies
10:37 am
Fri October 4, 2013

'The Fade': Four Barbers, Three Continents, One Film

London barber Faisal Abdu'Allah cuts director Andy Mundy-Castle's hair.
Big Bright Films

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 7:35 am

The Fade — a documentary by London filmmaker Andy Mundy-Castle — follows the lives of four barbers on three continents, all at the top of their game. New Jersey barber Johnny Castellanos also known as 'Hollywood' is a barber to the stars. His client list includes rapper and businessman Jay Z and artists and athletes like Pharrell Williams and Amar'e Stoudemire.

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Code Switch
11:09 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Wisconsin Prisons Incarcerate Most Black Men In U.S.

Researchers say that in Milwaukee County, more than half of all black men in their 30s and 40s had been incarcerated at some point.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 12:26 pm

The United States prison population is still the world's highest, with more than 1.5 million people behind bars. Black men are more likely to be sent to prison than white men, and often on drug offenses. A study from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee looked at that state's incarceration rates and found they were the highest in the country for black men.

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Rick Najera: A Latino In Hollywood Is 'Almost White'

Omar 'Yogi' Torres Courtesy of Shabazz Communications, Inc.

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:32 am

Rick Najera doesn't remember his wife Susie dialing 9-1-1. She came home six hours after Najera had taken a fall that left him bleeding on the floor of his home. The Hollywood actor/writer/producer had pneumonia and ended up in an intensive care unit in a coma.

Rick Najera told NPR's Michel Martin that his near-death experience caused him to reflect.

"I really looked at my life and I said I wanted to chronicle it. I wanted to bring it down and talk about it in a very human, honest way," he says.

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu October 3, 2013

A Global 'Soul Quest' With Jazz Artist Keiko Matsui

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 2:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now a conversation with a celebrated jazz artist. This year, she is celebrating 25 years of recording in the United States. Along the way, she's worked with major stars like Stevie Wonder, Miles Davis and Hugh Masekela. Her accessible sound resonates with audiences all over the world. We're talking about the pianist and composer Keiko Matsui.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STINGO")

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu October 3, 2013

A Second Golden Age Of TV?

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 2:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes, we'll speak with jazz artist Keiko Matsui. We'll talk about her new album "Soul Quest," and we'll hear about her efforts to help out after the tsunami in Japan. That's later.

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Federal Worker: "Just Don't Know If It's Worth It Anymore"

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 2:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we'll talk about the new fall television season, and we're always interested in whether the casts are diverse, but what about behind-the-scenes? One of Hollywood's most accomplished writers tells us about how he's tried to get more Latino voices into the mix and why that matters. That's all coming up.

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