Code Switch

Books
11:10 am
Tue November 19, 2013

'Coolie Woman' Rescues Indentured Women From Anonymity

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 1:37 pm

"Immigrant number 96153. That's how my great-grandmother was cataloged, that was the number on her immigration pass." says Gaiutra Bahadur, author of the new book Coolie Woman.

Bahadur set out to uncover her family's roots by following a paper trail of colonial archives and ship records that traced her great-grandmother's journey from a small village in India to the cane fields of Guyana.

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Law
3:23 am
Tue November 19, 2013

How Court's Bus Ruling Sealed Differences In Detroit Schools

In 1973, Ray Litt and a group of Detroiters went to court in an attempt to force the state to desegregate the city's schools.
NPR

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 12:46 pm

It was 40 years ago today that the Supreme Court accepted what became a landmark case about school desegregation. The case was controversial because it involved busing student between a largely African-American city — Detroit — and its white suburban areas. The ruling helped cement differences between urban schools and suburban neighborhoods.

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Code Switch
2:07 am
Tue November 19, 2013

A New Life For An Old Slave Jail

Formerly known as the Alexandria Slave Pen, this ashen gray row house in Alexandria, Va., once housed one of the country's largest slave-dealing firms.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 6:31 pm

President Abraham Lincoln stood on a battlefield in Gettysburg, Pa., 150 years ago and declared "a new birth of freedom" for the nation.

That same year, an African-American man named Lewis Henry Bailey experienced his own rebirth. At age 21, Bailey was freed from slavery in Texas. His journey began in Virginia, where he was sold as a child in a slave jail.

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Code Switch
2:07 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

What A Thug's Life Looked Like In 19th Century India

A photograph of a group of elderly men sitting on a mat, taken in Peshawar, now in Pakistan, circa 1865. Two of the men are looking at each other with contempt, suggesting that they may actually be enemies who have been persuaded to be photographed together as examples of native "thugs."
Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:48 pm

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NPR Story
11:08 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Tell Me More: Crowdsourcing Questions for 'Day in the Life' Twitter Series

Tell Me More is an NPR news-talk program, hosted by award-winning journalist Michel Martin.
Stephen Voss

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 11:58 am

What does a typical, or not so typical day consist of in the tech world? From December 2-20, African-American entrepreneurs and techies from across the country will use #NPRBlacksinTech on Twitter while participating in "A Day in the Life," a special social media series that follows tech heavyweights and rising stars through the course of one day.

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Books
11:04 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Actor Hill Harper On His Life-Changing 'Letters' From An Inmate

Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 2:13 pm

He's best known for starring in hit TV shows like CSI: NY and Covert Affairs, but actor Hill Harper's most significant role may be off the screen.

After writing several advice books, including the best-seller Letters to a Young Brother, Harper began receiving letters from young men in prison. He documents his relationship with one of them in his new book, Letters to an Incarcerated Brother.

He spoke with Tell Me More host Michel Martin about the prison system and how this friendship changed his life.

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Television
10:55 am
Mon November 18, 2013

'Totally Biased' TV Show Canceled, A Total Loss?

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:11 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Race
10:55 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Renisha McBride Shooting: 'We May Never Know' Why

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 1:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, when actor Hill Harper got a letter from a young man in prison, he wrote him back thinking that would be the end of it, but it wasn't - not by a long shot. Their correspondence lasted years and it's now the basis of Hill Harper's latest book "Letters to an Incarcerated Brother." And he'll tell us about it in just a few minutes.

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Education
10:55 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Homeless Students A Growing Problem For Schools

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 1:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we'll tell you about the late night talk show called "Totally Biased." Never heard of it? That might be why it was canceled. But we'll also hear why so many critics are up in arms that it was canceled. That's later this hour.

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Code Switch
3:34 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

A Jewish Comic And A Muslim Researcher Walk Into A Party ...

Dalia Mogahed delivers a speech after being coached by comedian and author Judy Carter.
Roxana Pop The Chautauquan Daily

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 7:07 pm

This is a story about a pair of unlikely partners.

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Code Switch
3:19 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Letters From Parents To Their Kids That'll Make You Smile (Or Cry)

This week, we've seen two stories with the theme of how tough parents and tough kids struggle to express their love for one another without, well, saying it aloud.

Many of us have lived these stories. We're the children of immigrant parents, of single moms and dads whose tired sighs at the end of the day we know all too well, of grandparents who stepped in and raised us when their children couldn't, and of parents who just found it hard to share their emotions.

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Barbershop
11:14 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Can President Obama Get Back In The Game After Health Care 'Fumble'?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer Jimi Izrael, with us from Cleveland. From Boston, health care consultant and contributor to National Review magazine, Neil Minkoff. Here in Washington, Paul Butler, professor of law at Georgetown University. And Corey Dade, contributing editor for The Root. Take it away, Jimi.

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NPR Story
11:14 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Music Lifts NASA Administrator's Spirits

NASA administrator.Charles F. Bolden, Jr. shares some of his worldly music selections in Tell Me More's occasional series In Your Ear.

NPR Story
11:14 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Young Maasai Activist Challenges Circumcision Tradition

The African Maasai ethnic group is known for its deep roots in tradition and culture, including rights of passage for men and female circumcision. Now, young Maasai woman Nice Nailantei Leng'ete is crusading for alternative rites of passage and empowering young girls to continue their education in Kenya. She tells Michel Martin how she stood her ground to promote the dangers of female genital cutting.Note: This conversation may not be comfortable for all listeners.

NPR Story
11:14 am
Fri November 15, 2013

UK Minister On Keeping The Faith At Home And Abroad

Whether tackling Islamophobia in her home country or Christian persecution worldwide, Baroness Sayeeda Warsi - the UK's first ever Minister of State for Faith and Communities - has a lot on her plate. She speaks with host Michel Martin about her duties in office and balancing the tightrope between church and state.

Code Switch
4:36 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Code Switch Roundup: Mascots, Nurses And Yellow Dogs

Yellow Dogs, an indie band from Iran, fled to the United States in 2010 to avoid crackdowns on rock music. This past week, the band met tragedy in a murder/suicide.
Danny Krug AP

Here are some stories about race, ethnicity and culture that have been on our radar here at Code Switch. Share what stories have caught your attention. Tell us on Twitter (@nprcodeswitch) or shout us out in the comments below.

Not every Asian knows martial arts, but ...

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NPR Story
11:21 am
Thu November 14, 2013

The Road Ahead For Obamacare

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 12:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we're in the thick of football season but increasingly, fans are worrying about how their favorite players are faring after their playing days are over. Now, there's a new plan to address that, and the head of the NFL Players Association will be joining us later in the program to tell us more about that - as well as, of course, his take on the allegations of bullying in the Miami Dolphins locker room. That's later.

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Around the Nation
11:21 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Radio Diaries 'Made Me Feel Important'

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 11:10 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Switching gears now, and cracking open a diary. The Radio Diaries project started nearly two decades ago with a simple idea - that the best way to hear people's stories is to let them record them and tell them themselves. It's given public radio listeners an up close and personal look at other people's lives. That view is so intimate that teen mom Melissa Rodriguez brought her recorder to the hospital with her to document this special moment.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVAL RECORDING)

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Sports
11:21 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Tackling Life After Football

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 12:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later, we'll meet up with a couple of members of the cast of "The Best Man." Remember, back in 1999, the movie broke ground and scored big at the box office. Now they're back with a sequel and we'll ask stars Terrence Howard and Sanaa Lathan to tell us more about it. That's in just a few minutes.

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Music
11:21 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Chrisette Michele's Music To Make Her Days Better

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 12:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for the occasional feature we call In Your Ear. That's where some of our guests give us a taste of the music that has special meaning to them. Today, we hear from singer-songwriter Chrisette Michele. We spoke with her earlier this year about her latest album "Better." And she told us about the music that makes her days better.

CHRISETTE MICHELE: Hey, this is Chrisette Michele, and what is in my ear is "No Way" by Tye Tribbett

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NO WAY")

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Movie Interviews
11:21 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Terrence Howard And Sanaa Lathan Dish On 'The Best Man Holiday'

Terrence Howard, Nia Long and Eddie Cibrian in The Best Man Holiday.
Michael Gibson AP/Universal Pictures

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 9:25 am

It's been nearly 15 years since movie lovers followed the romances and rivalries of college friends in The Best Man. There's Harper, the aspiring writer and "best man" of football star and husband-to-be Lance; Mia the bride-to-be of Lance; Robyn the girlfriend of Harper; Jordan the ambitious media maven; and Quentin the playboy.

Director Malcolm D. Lee's The Best Man became one of the top-grossing black movies of all time, and now the ensemble cast returns in The Best Man Holliday. The film opens in theaters Friday.

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Code Switch
3:38 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Fox Says Diversity Leads To Good Ratings And Better Business

Nicole Beharie and Tom Mison play Abbie Mills and Ichabod Crane in Fox's new show Sleepy Hollow.
Courtesy of Fox

It's easy, when writing about network TV, to be cynical.

For example, when I heard the Fox network had been holding annual conferences on diversity, telling top show producers their casts and crew had to feature more people of color, I remained skeptical. What's the catch, I wondered?

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Code Switch
2:22 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

How Can A White Supremacist Be 14 Percent Sub-Saharan African?

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 2:53 pm

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Code Switch
11:13 am
Wed November 13, 2013

A Windfall For A New Jersey Man And The Dominican Republic

Pedro Quezada, the winner of a $338 million Powerball jackpot, sent $57 million of his winnings to the Dominican Republic, according to his lawyer.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 3:50 pm

Pedro Quezada, winner of a $338 million Powerball lottery prize in March 2013, is being sued by his ex-girlfriend for a greater share of the winnings. In the course of the legal proceedings, Quezada's lawyer made public an interesting tidbit: Quezada has sent a whopping $57 million to the Dominican Republic. It's a high-profile and big-ticket example of an everyday phenomenon where immigrants to the U.S. send a total of billions and billions of dollars back to their country of origin.

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Beauty Shop
11:03 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Online Dating: Asian Women Preferred

Race influences most people's online dating preferences.
iStock

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 3:30 pm

When it comes to dating the rules aren't always black and white. And when you add race into the equation things can become even more complicated.

The online dating website "Are You Interested" analyzed over 2.4 million interactions on their site and found that Asian women are more likely to get a message from a man of any race—unless those men are Asian.

AYI also found that white men are pursued the most by women of all races—except black women, who are least likely to get a message from anyone.

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World
10:55 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Typhoon Haiyan: Families Struggle To Connect Amid Devastation

Wrecked infrastructure is making it hard for Filipino Americans to find out the status of family members affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jessica Petilla, a Filipino doctor in New York who has immediate family in the hard hit province of Leyte.

Around the Nation
10:55 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Peace First Prize Encourages Youth To Seek Change

The group Peace First is handing out $50,000 in prizes to young people who promote peace in their communities. Host Michel Martin speaks with Eric Dawson, the co-founder and president of Peace First, and recipient Babatunde Salaam.

Books
10:55 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Aid Worker: Hard To Put Experience Into Words

As an aid worker, Jessica Alexander worked in Rwanda, Sudan, Sierra Leone, and Haiti, but don't call her a hero or a saint. Alexander tells Michel Martin about why she wanted to challenge perceptions of aid workers in her new book, Chasing Chaos: My Decade In and Out of Humanitarian Aid.

World
10:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Reparations May Not Mean What You Think It Means

Fifteen countries in the Caribbean are seeking reparations from their former colonial masters for the lasting harm slavery has had on their countries. Host Michel Martin talks about the effort with Jermaine McCalpin from the University of West Indies in Jamaica.

World
10:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

In Dominican Republic, An Emotional Fight Over Citizenship

Thousands of people in the Dominican Republic are being stripped of their citizenship by that country. Host Michel Martin talks to Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles about why Dominicans of Haitian ancestry are denouncing the decision.

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