Code Switch

Can I Just Tell You?
11:21 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Poverty: 'We Need To Talk About It As It Is, Not As It Was'

iStock.

Finally today, I'd like to end the program where we started: talking about poverty. We, like a lot of other people in the news business have been talking about poverty a lot this week and last.

We're doing this because we have something called a news peg — which is a fancy word for a reason to talk about something we want to talk about anyway. And that news peg is the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson's first State of the Union address, when he said this:

"This administration today, here and now, declares unconditional war on poverty in America."

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Food
11:21 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Velveeta Shortage: 'Cheesepocalypse?'

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
11:21 am
Wed January 15, 2014

Judge Blocks NFL Concussion Settlement

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, some corners of the Internet are melting down because of a reported shortage of Velveeta. And don't try to act like you don't know what that is. We'll talk about the history of the ooey, gooey stuff and why, in a buffalo mozzarella world, we still like it. But first, to football. This is golden time for pro-football lovers. Two teams will book their tickets to the Super Bowl this weekend after a long season of hard hits.

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Technology
11:21 am
Wed January 15, 2014

How To Bridge The Racial Tech Gap

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later, we want to hear about why a federal judge has rejected a nearly multibillion dollar settlement - sorry, a multimillion dollar settlement that the NFL reached with former players. We'll hear what that could mean going forward. But first, we want to talk about a new report from the Pew Research Center that finds that only 80 percent of African-Americans are Internet users compared with 87 percent of whites.

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Economy
11:21 am
Wed January 15, 2014

U.S. Agriculture Secretary 'Convinced' Rural Revitalization Plan Will Work

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:03 am
Wed January 15, 2014

A Woman Comes To Terms With Her Family's Slave-Owning Past

"I have this day granted bargained and sold and by these present do grant bargain and sell unto the said Edward Clegg a Certain Mulatto Girl named Harriet aged about eight years. Slave for life, and sound in body and mind, and the title to said Girl I do hereby warrant and will forever defend."
Courtesy of Todd Perry

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 2:38 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often, NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Children's Health
10:53 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Toddler Removed From Home After Viral Swearing Video

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. Today, we're talking about something you might have talked about yourself with other parents or friends if you've seen this video.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: You a hoe (bleep).

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD: You a hoe (bleep).

MAN: What's up then?

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Education
10:53 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Classrooms Getting More Diverse, But Teachers Of Color Struggle

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Your Money
10:53 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Minorities' Savings Accounts Aren't Adding Up For Retirement

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, last week we talked with a former teacher who said that teachers of color are more likely to quit than others. And she offered some thoughts about why that is. This week, we get a different perspective from another teacher, also of color, who has 13 years in and is still going strong. And we'll hear from her in a few minutes.

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Economy
10:53 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Does The U.S. 'Make Poverty More Comfortable?'

Originally published on Wed January 15, 2014 2:15 pm

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Code Switch
10:48 am
Tue January 14, 2014

The Shakespearean Lineage Of 'Where The Magic Happens'

In this photo from 1993, television producer Aaron Spelling's Los Angeles home is shown. Spelling's widow placed the 56,000 square-foot house on the market for $150 million.
MARK TERRILL AP

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 1:04 pm

MTV Cribs was the guiltiest of pop-culture pleasures in the early 2000s. The premise was simple. Stars showed off their houses, and the masses got a peek at life behind the mansion gates. Viewers saw "where the magic happened"*, to borrow a recurring phrase used by celebrities as they displayed their bedrooms. And no episode was more magical than when Mariah Carey provided a tour of her penthouse apartment and hopped on her stationary step climber in heels.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:32 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Discovering Grief And Freedom In A Family's History Of Slavery

"Michael Goings, a man of colour personally appearing in Court and producing satisfactory evidence of his freedom. It is ordered that the following be entered as his Register. To wit, aged 23 years 5 feet 11 1/2 inches high of light complexion. No scars no marks perceivable all of which is ordered to be certified."
Courtesy of Robert Goins

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 10:40 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often, NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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World
10:41 am
Mon January 13, 2014

'Weight Of The World' On Syrian Boy's Shoulders

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 12:42 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, the good news in many cities is that the murder rate is at historic lows, but the bad news is that many of those murders remain unsolved. We'll take a look at New York City, where a newspaper's close look at the issue is raising some uncomfortable questions about race and geography. But first, we return to a major international story that's also provoking some uncomfortable questions for world powers - the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Syria.

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Around the Nation
10:41 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Understanding What It Means To Be Transgender

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 5:53 pm

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Law
10:41 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Does Justice For Murder Victims Depend On Race, Geography?

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 12:42 pm

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Code Switch
2:07 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Decades Later, Desegregation Still On The Docket In Little Rock

Eight of the nine black students who integrated Little Rock Central High School walk from school to their waiting Army station wagon on Oct. 2, 1957.
Ferd Kaufman AP

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 12:23 pm

In Little Rock, Ark., on Monday, a federal judge is considering a deal that would end one of the longest-running and most notorious school desegregation cases in the country. The state, its largest school districts and lawyers representing black students have agreed to settle a complex lawsuit over unequal education.

Little Rock has long been the symbol of the South's violent reaction to Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 Supreme Court ruling that declared school segregation unconstitutional.

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Code Switch
2:08 pm
Sun January 12, 2014

Should NAACP Image Awards Only Go To African-Americans?

Robin Thicke, center, performs with Verdine White, left, and T.I. at The Grammy Nominations Concert Live!! in Los Angeles in December. Thicke is nominated for Outstanding Male Artist at the NAACP Image Awards this year.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Who should be eligible to receive an award from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People? And if that definition becomes flexible, what does that do to the mission of the award itself?

That's a question worth asking as the NAACP Thursday unveiled a huge roster of nominees for its 45th annual Image Awards — a ceremony long thought to be a way to honor African-American performers who are often ignored by mainstream Hollywood awards contests.

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Code Switch
4:27 pm
Sat January 11, 2014

Superhero Super-Fans Talk Race And Identity In Comics

As part of Orion Martin's project, X-Men of Color, he reimagined this famous X-Men cover by recoloring two characters as brown. This cover comes from a storyline in which mutants are being rounded up and exterminated by the government.
Orion Martin

Originally published on Sat January 11, 2014 5:17 pm

The X-Men comic franchise has proven remarkably sturdy in the half-century since its launch. It's spawned dozens of animated series and four major Hollywood films with a fifth due out this summer. Part of that is due to its central premise — a minority of superpowered humans called mutants are discriminated against by their government and fellow citizens — which has functioned as a sci-fi allegory for everything from the civil rights movement to the AIDS crisis.

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Code Switch
4:25 am
Sat January 11, 2014

Who Gets To Be A Superhero? Race And Identity In Comics

Orion Martin reimagined several iconic X-Men covers, recasting the superheroes as people of color. The move sparked a discussion on race in comics, both on the page and in the writers' rooms.
Orion Martin

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 6:20 pm

The X-Men comic franchise has proven remarkably sturdy in the half-century since its launch. They've spawned dozens of animated series and four major Hollywood films with a fifth due out this summer. A big part of that is due to its central premise — a minority of superpowered humans called mutants are discriminated against by their government and fellow citizens — which has functioned as a sci-fi allegory for everything from the civil rights movement to the AIDS crisis.

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Code Switch
2:05 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Franklin McCain: Taking Jim Crow Off The Menu

Franklin McCain (left) and David Richmond are shown in April 1960. They were two of the four Greensboro, N.C., college students who started demonstrations against segregated lunch counters in February 1960.
AP

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 3:05 pm

When Franklin McCain was a freshman at North Carolina A&T State University, he was sitting himself down at a whites-only lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C., as a conscious gesture to change the world. Or at least the segregated world in his home state. They were protesting the downtown stores' policy of refusing sit-down service to blacks (although the stores were perfectly happy to take black customers' money for things other than lunch).

Today's Special: Jim Crow

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BackTalk
12:47 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Listeners Weigh In: Transgendered Students Choosing Bathrooms

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for BackTalk. That's where we hear from you. Editor Ammad Omar is back with us once again. What's going on Ammad?

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Economy
12:47 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Why Getting A Job Doesn't Mean Getting Out Of Poverty

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This week, we, like many of our colleagues, have been talking about poverty because this week marks 50 years after President Lyndon Johnson declared a war on poverty. Later this hour, we'll speak with a minister who now preaches from the same pulpit where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. once stood in Atlanta - Ebenezer Baptist Church. And he's asking whether the black church is still a force for addressing issues like poverty. That's later.

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Barbershop
11:19 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Chris Christie's Apology Enough To End 'Bridgegate'?

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 12:47 pm

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Politics
10:46 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Digging Into 'Duty: Memoirs Of A Secretary At War'

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 11:48 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to turn now to a story getting a lot of buzz in Washington. "Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War," written by former Defense Secretary Robert Gates, isn't scheduled to be released until next week, but some journalists have already gotten their copies and it's already making headlines.

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Faith Matters
10:46 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Taking The Black Church Back To Its Roots

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 12:47 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Code Switch
10:43 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Conversation About 'SNL' And Diversity 'Just Getting Started'

Meet Sasheer Zamata, Saturday Night Live's new cast member.
Heidi Gutman ABC via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 12:10 pm

It may seem, now that Saturday Night Live has hired a black female cast member and two black female writers, that the conversation about diversity on TV's most influential comedy show is over.

But it's just getting started.

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Code Switch
4:59 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

White House Picks Choctaw Nation To Fight Poverty In Oklahoma

Chief Gregory Pyle (left) and Assistant Chief Gary Batton stand in front of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's Capitol building in Tuskahoma, Okla.
Larissa Copeland Courtesy of Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

Fifty years after President Lyndon Johnson declared his "War on Poverty," President Obama issued his own plan to combat poverty Thursday with the nation's first five "Promise Zones."

All "Promise Zones" will receive a competitive advantage when applying for federal grants, on-site support from federal officials, and, pending congressional approval, tax incentives for businesses hiring and investing in the community.

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Code Switch
3:20 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Los Angeles Tries A New Approach To Discipline In Schools

Attorney General Eric Holder presented yesterday the first national guidelines on school discipline. In this file photo from Oct. 2013 he attends the announcement of Jeh Johnson as the next Homeland Security Secretary.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Rosa Solache was fed up with getting teased every day before school, between classes, and even on the way home, so one day she punched her antagonist in the face.

"I was really sick of it and I had told the teacher, but no one was doing anything, so I said, 'What the heck, I'm going to take care of this by myself.'"

Solache was an eighth-grader at the time, 12 years old, and until that day, she says, "I had always been a good girl."

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Code Switch
12:45 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

States May Recognize Same-Sex Marriages, But Navajo Nation Won't

The Navajo Nation prohibits marriage between persons of the same sex, and critics are now challenging that ban.
dbking/flickr

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 4:13 pm

The Navajo Nation has prohibited same-sex marriage since 2005, when the Diné Marriage Act was passed. Now, critics are challenging that ban.

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Education
10:34 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Students Of Color Don't Apply To Top Schools, But They Should

Deadlines to apply for colleges are coming up - and some experts say a lot of qualified minority students won't be applying to the top schools. Host Michel Martin speaks with Donald Fraser, Jr., of CollegeSnapps, Inc. and Caroline Hoxby, an economist at Stanford University about why some students of color aren't trying to get into prestigious schools.

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