Code Switch

Music
1:41 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

'Spirit Of Family' Unites Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Darren Phillip Jones

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 10:58 am

For fans of world music, South Africa's Ladysmith Black Mambazo needs no introduction.

The group has been singing a capella together for 50 years, brought together by Joseph Shabalala, a young farmhand turned factory worker from the town of Ladysmith. He had a dream of tight vocal harmonies and messages of peace.

That dream developed, and the band came to the attention of Paul Simon, who had it record "Homeless" on his album Graceland. It introduced the group to the world.

Read more
Sports
10:40 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Could Northwestern Football Union Even Out College Priorities?

Originally published on Thu January 30, 2014 1:37 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
U.S.
10:40 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Effects Of Gun Violence Are Long Lasting And Wide Ranging, Says Expert

Originally published on Thu January 30, 2014 1:37 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Now we'd like to return to an issue that's in the news all too often. We're talking about gun violence, particularly that experienced by children. That's something the president touched on in his State of the Union address Tuesday night, and something that, in fact, dominated his speech last year. But when we talk about this issue, usually, tragically, we are talking about young people who've been killed.

Read more
Africa
10:38 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Egypt: 'A Very Divided Nation Right Now'

Originally published on Thu January 30, 2014 1:37 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Today, we want to focus on events in Egypt, which as you probably know, has seen some of the region's most dramatic change since the beginning of the Arab Spring when longtime President Hosni Mubarak agreed to relinquish power.

Read more
Code Switch
8:26 pm
Wed January 29, 2014

When The Beat Was Born: Hip-Hop's Big Bang Becomes A Kid's Book

Theodore Taylor III was given an award by the American Library Association for his artwork in When The Beat Was Born, a children's book about hip-hop's origins.
Roaring Brook Press

By now, the origin story is pretty well-known. Back in the early 1970s, a crew of kids of color in the South Bronx threw a bunch of parties where they plugged their turntables and their huge, 6-foot speakers into streetlight posts. They took the breakbeats from popular dance songs and rhymed aloud over them. Those parties were, in effect, hip-hop's genesis.

Read more
NPR Story
11:50 am
Wed January 29, 2014

Writer Attica Locke Cuts Deep With Latest Thriller

Originally published on Thu January 30, 2014 1:28 pm

Attica Locke writes the kind of rooted-in-truth crime story that satisfies both your intellect and your need to have the hair on your neck stand up.

With only her second novel under her belt, she's won praise from other thriller writers like James Ellroy and George Pelecanos. And she just received another high honor: She was awarded the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence, which honors outstanding work by rising African-American writers, for her book The Cutting Season.

Locke was a screenwriter, but early in her career she encountered obstacles.

Read more
NPR Story
11:50 am
Wed January 29, 2014

Disrupting Class To Make Way For Technology

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Education was another of the issues the president touched on last night. Over the past few months, we've been talking a lot about the STEM fields - that's science, technology, engineering and math. We've been placing a particular focus on the shortage of blacks in tech because blacks make up just 5 percent of America's scientists and engineers, that according to a study by the National Science Foundation.

Read more
NPR Story
11:50 am
Wed January 29, 2014

Should The President Have Apologized For Obamacare Issues?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
11:50 am
Wed January 29, 2014

President Shows A 'Different Attitude' At State Of The Union

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR news. I'm Michel Martin. The State of the Union speech has been a big deal in Washington, D.C. for years. Lawmakers gather hours in advance for a prime seat and interest groups spent hours afterwards cranking out their responses.

Read more
Code Switch
8:32 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Morrie Turner, 1923-2014: Drawing Gentle Lessons In Tolerance

Morrie Turner's Wee Pals was the first nationally syndicated comic strip by a black cartoonist. It was first published in 1965.
Morrie Turner Courtesy of Creators Syndicate

Originally published on Thu January 30, 2014 10:00 am

Read more
Code Switch
4:30 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Remaking All That Jazz From Shanghai's Lost Era

Electronic music producer Dave Liang and jazz singer Zhang Le collaborated on a new album of Shanghai jazz standards from the 1930s and 1940s.
Zhuang Yan Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 5:55 pm

You may not hear it when you're listening to Shanghai jazz standards from the 1930s and '40s, but dig deeper into their history and you'll find a generational skip in the record.

Read more
Money Coach
10:51 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Scammers Taking Advantage Of Retail Data Breaches

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 3:34 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now it's time for our Money Coach conversation. You've heard by now about the problems at a number of retail stores like Target and Neiman Marcus, where hackers were able to access supposedly private information from the millions of customers who used credit and debit cards at the stores. But now there are people trying to take advantage of that chaos and scam you again. Here to tell us more is Sheryl Harris who writes for The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. Welcome back. Thanks so much for joining us.

Read more
Parenting
10:48 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Teenagers Are 'Crazy' But Expert Says Behavior Is Vital To Development

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 10:50 am

Teenagers are often seen as impulsive and moody. But psychiatrist Daniel Siegel says it's time to rethink adolescence as a time of great opportunity, as well as challenge. Host Michel Martin speaks with Dr. Siegel about the teenage brain and his new book Brainstorm. Parents Leslie Morgan Steiner and Aracely Panameno join in.

Law
10:46 am
Tue January 28, 2014

New Orleans' Former Mayor Ray Nagin In Court For Corruption

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 3:34 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
World
10:45 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Living In The Spirit Of Daniel Pearl

Daniel Pearl and Asra Nomani in Karachi in 2001
Courtesy Asra Nomani

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:02 pm

It has been more than a decade since Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl was kidnapped and brutally murdered in Pakistan. On January 23, 2002, he left the house of his friend and colleague, Asra Nomani, for an interview but never returned.

Read more
Movies
11:28 am
Mon January 27, 2014

'Dear White People' A Hit At Sundance

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Law
11:28 am
Mon January 27, 2014

Conjugal Visits: Costly And Perpetuate Single Parenting?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
U.S.
11:28 am
Mon January 27, 2014

Gay Politicians: Washington's In Crowd Is Out

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Music
11:28 am
Mon January 27, 2014

The Grammys: Music, Fashion And Even A Wedding

Host Michel Martin speaks with Amrit Singh, music editor and host for Revolt TV, about the big Grammy Award winners.

Arts & Life
11:28 am
Mon January 27, 2014

New Muslim Ms. Marvel Doesn't Drink, Date Or Eat Bacon

Kamala Khan, a Muslim teenager living in New Jersey, is the latest superhero to don the Ms. Marvel mantle.
AP

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 7:24 pm

Marvel is introducing a new character: Kamala Khan. She's a 16-year-old Muslim public high school student in Jersey City. She's also the new Ms. Marvel, and the first Muslim superhero to star in her own mainstream comic book series. Author G. Willow Wilson spoke with Tell Me More host Michel Martin about her new series.


Interview Highlights

On Kamala Khan's challenges to come

Read more
Code Switch
6:02 am
Mon January 27, 2014

What Does 'Sold Down The River' Really Mean? The Answer Isn't Pretty

Slave auction in New Orleans, 1842, "Sale of Estates, Pictures and Slaves in the Rotunda, New Orleans." The nation's most active slave market was in New Orleans. Slaves who had been "sold down the river" were auctioned off to plantation owners.
Encyclopaedia Britannica UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 11:15 am

For generations, the phrase "sold down the river" has been used to signify a profound betrayal.

"River" was a literal reference to the Mississippi or Ohio rivers. For much of the first half of the 19th century, Louisville, Ky., was one of the largest slave-trading marketplaces in the country. Slaves would be taken to Louisville to be "sold down the river" and transported to the cotton plantations in states further south.

Read more
Code Switch
8:43 am
Sun January 26, 2014

Can The Auto Industry Win The Future If It Looks Like 1974?

Incoming General Motors CEO Mary Barra at the center of the press scrum during the North American International Auto Show.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:33 pm

So my week at the North American International Auto Show is wrapping up. It's my fourth Detroit Auto Show. And boy has it come a long way.

There is a vibrancy and spirit this year that's different than other shows. There's also been a lot more money spent. The tenor of the show is very different than when the federal government had an ownership stake in Chrysler and General Motors.

Read more
Code Switch
7:44 am
Sun January 26, 2014

For Persian Jews, America Means 'Religious Pluralism At Its Best'

Roben Farzad and his mother in their 1978 visa photo
Courtesy of Roben Farzad

Code Switch has been writing about some overlooked cultural interactions that have helped shape what Jewish identity is today, and we continue the series with a post by Tell Me More Senior Producer Davar Ardalan on Iranian Jews.

Read more
NPR Story
11:36 am
Fri January 24, 2014

NFL's Richard Sherman 'Puts the 'I' In Team'

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
11:36 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Is Fresh Take On The Voting Rights Act A 'Gold Mine'?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
11:36 am
Fri January 24, 2014

70 Years On, Judge Reexamines Black Teen's Conviction

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee. This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, Congress is considering legislation that would reinforce voting protections after the Supreme Court stripped the Voting Rights Act of many enforcement powers last session. We'll take a closer look at the proposal in just a moment. But first, a question of justice delayed. Fourteen-year-old George Stinney was executed in the 1944.

Read more
NPR Story
11:36 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Syrian Loyalists 'Will Continue To Fight' For Assad

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we'll hear the story of a 14-year-old African-American boy who was executed back in the 1940s. Now a South Carolina judge is taking another look at that case, and we'll tell you why in a moment. But first, world leaders are gathered in Switzerland this week. They're trying to broker peace in Syria. But those talks might already be on the verge of collapsing with the Syrian government today threatening to walk out.

Read more
Code Switch
11:29 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Poll Of U.S. Latinos Offers Snapshot Of Immigrant Vs. Nonimmigrant Experience

Spectators react as they watch the Dominican Day Parade in New York City last summer.
Tina Fineberg AP

Our poll on the life experiences of Latino Americans underscored just how different those experiences can be. But many of the most interesting comparisons among our respondents were between folks who were born here in the United States or Puerto Rico and those who were born elsewhere and came here later.

Read more
Code Switch
4:42 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

What Sami Discovered On The Way To Becoming A Man Of Color

Sami Younes, 26, began his physical transition three years ago. "Transition didn't solve everything for me. I still have a lot of growing to do as person. But I think I'm in a better position to face it now," he said. One of the things that Younes navigates now is how people react to him as a transgender Lebanese and Puerto Rican man.
Erica Yoon NPR

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:20 pm

Not many people can say they've experienced the world both as an Arab-Latino woman and as an Arab-Latino man. Sami Younes can.

Younes, 26, was once Mariam, a Lebanese and Puerto Rican woman. When he began his physical transition three years ago to become a man, the way people reacted to his change surprised him.

Read more
Code Switch
4:23 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Raised In The U.S. And Coming Out To Immigrant Parents

Camila Fierro and her girlfriend, Erica Brien.
Jasmine Garsd NPR

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:32 pm

Editor's Note: This week Code Switch has been bringing you a series of stories prompted by a poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. And one of the findings that stood out was a striking difference between Latinos born and raised in the U.S. and immigrants when it comes to the degree of openness when it comes to talking about sexual orientation.

Read more

Pages