Code Switch

Code Switch
7:16 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Love In Technicolor: Interracial Families On Television

In Parenthood, Dax Shepard plays Crosby, whose wife, Jasmine, is played by Joy Bryant. Their son is Jabbar (Tyree Brown).
NBC NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:04 pm

I Love Lucy was one of the most popular shows in the history of television. Its stars, redheaded Lucille Ball and her Cuban-American husband Desi Arnaz, became TV icons — but they almost didn't get on TV.

Kathleen Brady is the author of Lucille: The Life of Lucille Ball. She says the network that wanted Ball to star in her own sitcom was not interested in her husband.

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Code Switch
1:37 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

What We Learned From Our Month-Long Exploration Of #XCultureLove

These photos make us think that maybe, it's time we start a Code Switch stock photo database. ...
iStockphoto

Someone in Southern California seems to have a real issue with Asian-American women. Their main sticking point? Relationships between Asian-American women and white men.

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Music
1:19 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Ladysmith Black Mambazo On A Mission To Preserve Culture

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 10:55 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Finally, on this President’s Day, we hear, again, from a group that was a favorite of another president – former South African president Nelson Mandela. Now if you are a fan of world music, they need no introduction. Ladysmith Black Mambazo have been singing together for 50 years. They were brought together in 1964, after Joseph Shabalala, a young farm boy turned factory worker from the town of Ladysmith, had a dream.

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Books
1:19 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Learning About Honest Abe's Life Through Food

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 10:54 am

You've read about Abraham Lincoln in the history books, but what can cookbooks tell us about Honest Abe? Host Michel Martin speaks with Rae Katherin Eighmey, author of Abraham Lincoln In The Kitchen: A Culinary View of Lincoln's Life and Times.

Barbershop
11:05 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Did Michael Sam Take A 'Huge Risk' To Come Out Before The Draft?

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 1:27 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Music
10:57 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Remembering The Radio Stations That Got Loud With 'Black And Proud'

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 1:27 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Digital Life
10:57 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Jay Z Or Jay-Z? Buzzfeed Tells You When To Hyphenate

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 1:27 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. So here's a problem you might have had if you are a journalist or if you edit a neighborhood or a company newsletter or you just like to be correct and up-to-date in your written expressions. If you want to write about the hip-hop mogul who is married to Beyonce - and let's face it, who doesn't - do you write Jay Z with a dash or without? Is fat shaming one word or two?

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Politics
10:57 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Why 'No One is Running With The President In Missouri'

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 12:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Much of the East Coast is digging out from ice and snow including Washington, D.C. But members of Congress beat the bad weather out of town and are back in their districts for a two week recess, this after a vote to raise the debt ceiling - a vote that came unusual for these times without an ugly showdown.

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Race
4:03 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Pop Music Lags In Dealing With Interracial Love Anxieties

They're most likely not listening to a song about cross-cultural love.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 4:00 pm

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Code Switch
1:46 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Instagram Posts, KKK Rallies And Other Racial Sensitivities

Clarence Thomas is seen in a high school year book photo, circa 1959. He said that people are more sensitive about race now than they were when he lived in segregated Georgia and was the first black student to attend his school.
AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 6:21 pm

Earlier this week, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas spoke to an audience at Palm Beach Atlantic University. Thomas, the second black member of the Supreme Court, felt that in one clear aspect of racial and cultural relations in the U.S., we've not moved forward:

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Code Switch
1:39 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

National Puerto Rican Day Parade Reorganizes After Misuse Of Funds

Parade onlookers cheer marchers in last year's National Puerto Rican Day Parade in New York.
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 4:32 pm

The National Puerto Rican Day Parade will be marching down New York City's Fifth Avenue under new leadership this year.

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Arts & Life
10:50 am
Thu February 13, 2014

From Top Model To Black Panther, Actress Yaya Alafia Is 'Truly African-American'

In 2013, Yaya Alafia played Black Panther Carol Hammie in The Butler.
Beth Rosner Management

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 1:22 pm

Yaya Alafia arrived on TV screens more than a decade ago as Yaya DaCosta, the young model proud of her African and Latina roots in Season 3 of America's Next Top Model. But, as she tells NPR's Michel Martin, she has come a long way since competing on the series. "I have practiced such deliberate amnesia when it came to that show," she admits. "Just hearing my voice at such a young, vulnerable age, forced into this other world that I wasn't prepared for."

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Remembrances
10:50 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Why Stuart Hall Was The 'Godfather Of Multiculturalism'

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:17 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to take a few minutes to pay tribute to scholar Stuart Hall. He was widely known and respected in academic circles as the godfather of multiculturalism. He died this week in England at the age of 82. Born in Jamaica, he studied at Oxford University as a Rhodes scholar.

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Technology
10:50 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Are Tech Execs Uncomfortable Around Young Black Men?

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:17 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. You may remember that last week we spoke with organizers of a hackathon in Oakland, California. It was a gathering of developers who were asked to consider ideas for, say, a smartphone app that could've saved Trayvon Martin or perhaps solve other social problems.

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U.S.
10:50 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Can Federal Program Keep Mom And Dad Together?

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:17 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Valentine's Day is tomorrow and that means that millions of American men and women are making plans to please their romantic partners, at least in parts of the country where they are not buried under snow and ice. But what you might not know is that, for some years now, the federal government has been involved, not so much in romance, but in teaching families so-called relationship skills.

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Music
10:50 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Afro Latino Music: Reimagining Songs Rooted In The Slave Trade

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:17 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We wanted to talk more about how people who claim both African and Latin heritage are re-examining that heritage. Now we want to see how that's playing out in music, and also how music is allowing some people to re-examine some painful and difficult issues. Who better to tell us more about this than the cohost of NPR's Alt.Latino. Felix Contreras is with us in Washington, D.C. And holding it down in Mexico City, Jasmine Garsd. Jasmine, Felix, welcome back.

JASMINE GARSD, BYLINE: Thanks for having us.

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Code Switch
6:00 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Redefining Hollywood: 'Diversity Makes More Money'

NBCUniversal's The Voice judges Adam Levine (from left), Christina Aguilera, CeeLo Green and Blake Shelton at the Season 3 Red Carpet Event at The House of Blues Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, Calif., in 2012.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

If you spend much time talking about diversity in Hollywood, it's an argument you'll hear often: that ethnic and gender diversity is nice, but it doesn't make a movie profitable or bring ratings to a TV show.

But researchers at the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA have produced a study that just might stick a pin in that defense, sorting through over 1,200 films and TV shows to reach a provocative conclusion:

Diversity makes more money and brings bigger audiences.

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Race
11:03 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Love And Romance: Is One Race More Attractive Than Another?

Stock photos that portray diversity and romance leave much to be desired.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 2:39 pm

Over this past month, we've been exploring the way race impacts the dating world with #xculturelove. Recently, we discussed the way racial and cultural preferences play out in our dating lives.

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Sports
11:01 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Winter Olympics: Empty Seats Signify Low Interest?

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 12:43 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
11:01 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Fixing Poverty Is More Complicated Than Handing Out Cash

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 12:43 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. It's been 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson declared a war on poverty so all this year we've been looking at poverty here in the U.S. We've been talking about strategies to end poverty, what's worked, what hasn't and what's on the table because according to the U.S. Census, the rate of poverty seems to be stuck at 15 percent. That's about 46 million people.

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World
11:01 am
Wed February 12, 2014

U.S. Mayor Recalls Putting Together The First Jamaican Bobsled Team

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 12:43 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to stay in the spirit of the Winter Olympics. You might be keeping an eye on the Jamaican bobsled team. Their first appearance at the winter games back in 1988 was immortalized in the popular Disney movie "Cool Runnings." Here's a clip.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "COOL RUNNINGS")

DOUG E. DOUG: (As Sanka Coffie) ...I am Sanka Coffie, I am the best pushcart driver in all of Jamaica. I must drive. Do you dig where I'm coming from?

JOHN CANDY: (As Irv) Yeah, I did where you're coming from.

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Code Switch
2:46 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

George Washington Carver, The Black History Monthiest Of Them All

The George Washington Carver National Monument in Diamond, Mo., was the first dedicated to a nonpresident.
John S. Stewart AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 9:43 am

Peanuts.

He did something, probably a lot of somethings, with peanuts.

That's basically the response I got when I asked people — my friends, folks on Twitter — what they knew about about George Washington Carver.

The details were hazy, but folks remembered that Carver was really important.

Oh, and something about Tuskegee! Wait, did he invent the peanut?

They half-remembered writing book reports about him in elementary school. And then a lot of them sheepishly acknowledged their ignorance.

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Money Coach
12:38 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

How Not To Get Swept Off Your Feet By A Sweetheart Scam

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now to matters of personal finance as we get close to Valentine's Day, which is Friday. And don't say I didn't remind you. Romance is in the air, and you might be looking for ways to touch your beloved's heart. But some scammers are thinking about ways to touch your wallet.

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Music
10:57 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Nigerian-American Writer Teju Cole Shares His Personal Playlist

Courtesy of Teju Cole

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 1:45 pm

Nigerian-American writer Teju Cole's fans and followers — especially on Twitter — are scattered across the globe.

For Tell Me More's "In Your Ear" series, he shares the music that's a part of his world.

"Lately I've been listening a lot to Nigerian dance music," he says about Naeto C's 5 & 6. "Nigerian pop music is very, very big in Lagos right now."

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Parenting
10:57 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Children And Anorexia: Noticing The Warning Signs

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 12:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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U.S.
10:57 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Coping With The Cold Is About Survival For The Homeless

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 12:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
10:57 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Fighting Gender Bias: 'Women Need To Be Savvier Than Men'

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 12:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. With all the talk about Hillary Clinton possibly running for president again and the first woman CEO was just named at one of the big three automakers - that's General Motors - women like Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook telling women to lean in, it might seem as if the glass ceiling has finally shattered or is about to and that the biases that have long plagued women at work are long gone.

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NPR Story
3:55 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Study: Stereotypes Drive Perceptions Of Race

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 1:27 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Governments, schools and companies all keep track of your race. The stats they collect are used to track the proportion of blacks and whites who graduate from school, for example. They tell us how many people identify themselves as Native American or Asian. They help us to measure health disparities between races. But there's a problem with all of those statistics and with the deeper way that we think about race. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam is here to explain. Hi, Shankar.

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Behind Closed Doors
11:05 am
Mon February 10, 2014

The Truth About Miscarriage: Being In 'Gestational Limbo'

Originally published on Mon February 10, 2014 1:06 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we go behind closed doors. That's the part of the program where we talk about issues that people usually keep private. And today, we are focusing on miscarriage. And if you've ever gone through it or know someone who has, then you know it's devastating and surprisingly common. The National Institutes of Health report that 15 to 20 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage.

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Health
11:05 am
Mon February 10, 2014

Fifty Years After Major Report, Surgeons General Work To End Smoking

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 11:41 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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