Code Switch

Code Switch
7:03 am
Sat November 30, 2013

Odds Favor White Men, Asian Women On Dating App

A recent study on data from a dating app found all women except black women were most drawn to white men, and men of all races (with one notable exception) prefer Asian women.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat November 30, 2013 4:26 pm

Researchers recently took data from the Facebook app Are You Interested and found that not only is race a factor in our online dating interests, but particular races get disproportionately high — and low — amounts of interest.

Of the 2.4 million heterosexual interactions researchers reviewed, the findings show:

  • Women get three times the interactions men do.
  • All men seemed to be more interested in people outside their race.
  • Black men and women get the lowest response rates to their messages.
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Code Switch
1:55 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

New Pilot Program Gives Immigrant Detainees Public Defenders

Matthew Diller, dean of Yeshiva University's Cardozo School of Law, talks with press about the New York Immigrant Family Unity Project in June.
Cardozo School of Law

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 10:34 am

In the American criminal justice system, you have the right to an attorney. And if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you.

That's not the case if you're a defendant in U.S. immigration court. Immigration proceedings are civil matters, and the Constitution does not extend the right to court-appointed attorneys to immigrant detainees.

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Books
11:29 am
Wed November 27, 2013

A Year Inside The New York Jets

Originally published on Thu November 28, 2013 8:17 am

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Music Interviews
11:20 am
Wed November 27, 2013

John Legend On Marriage, Music And 'Genius' Kanye West

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 11:27 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. My next guest needs little introduction because John Legend is, at a young age, already an R&B legend. His musicianship, impeccable phrasing, versatility and buttery sound have earned him nine Grammy awards. But it's been a while since he's delivered a solo. But now he's back with a new disc of original material titled "Love in the Future."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ALL OF ME")

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Around the Nation
11:20 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Tell Me More Hosts 'Friendsgiving'

Originally published on Thu November 28, 2013 8:17 am

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Religion
11:03 am
Wed November 27, 2013

How Hannukah Got Americanized

Contrary to what some Americans believe, Hanukkah traditionally isn't one of the most important holidays in the Jewish calendar. Host Michel Martin speaks with Dianne Ashton, author of the book Hanukkah in America, about how and why the holiday has gained more importance in this country over the decades.

Technology
10:39 am
Wed November 27, 2013

A Day In The Life: Blacks At The Cutting Edge Of Innovation

NPR Staff

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 12:17 pm

NPR's Tell Me More is again using social media to reach out to a new community of leaders — this time, to recognize black innovators in technology. African-Americans represent just 5 percent of America's scientists and engineers, according to a 2010 study by the National Science Foundation.

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Middle East
10:28 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Iranian Expats: Iranian State 'Not A Monolith'

The United States, along with five other world powers, has signed an agreement with Iran over its controversial nuclear program. What do Iranian expatriates in America think of the deal, which would temporarily ease western sanctions? Host Michel Martin speaks to human rights activist Sussan Tahmasebi and writer Roya Hakakian.

Barbershop
10:02 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Barbershop Guys Take Time To Listen (For A Change!)

Transcript

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Books
9:59 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Rick Najera: A Latino In Hollywood Is 'Almost White'

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Music
9:58 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Music Is Motivation For Olympian John Carlos

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Music Interviews
9:56 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Blitz The Ambassador: Fighting Against Invisibility

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NPR Story
9:12 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Mashing Up Holiday Favorites For The 'Thanksgivukkah' Table

Sweet potato latkes
Courtesy Joan Nathan

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 6:21 pm

The second night of Hanukkah is converging with Turkey Day this year, forming a rare and delicious holiday that's being called "Thanksgivukkah."

As if cooking a 15- or 20-pound turkey isn't enough, many families will be trying to add traditional Hanukkah foods to the table. Joan Nathan, one of the country's foremost authorities on Jewish cooking, has some ideas on how to elegantly combine the two holidays: sweet potato latkes with celeriac root and apple (recipe below), ginger cookies decorated with menorahs and turkeys, and even kale salad with olive oil.

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Code Switch
7:14 am
Wed November 27, 2013

'The Knockout Game': An Old Phenomenon With Fresh Branding

This still from a video of an alleged "knockout game" assault has been played over and over on news reports on the supposed trend.
HLN

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 7:00 pm

There are a few variations, but this is generally how "the knockout game" works: A teenager, or a bunch of teenagers, bored and looking for something to get into, spies some unsuspecting mark on the street. They size up the person, then walk up close to their target and — BLAM — punch him or her as hard as possible in an effort to knock the person out. The most brazen perpetrators even post the videos on sites like YouTube and Vine.

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The Salt
2:23 am
Wed November 27, 2013

After Years Of Pasta, Rice Returns To A Filipino Family Kitchen

Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil with her grandmother, who taught her to make the Filipino dish lumpia, in 2009.
Courtesy of Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 10:40 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Code Switch
2:19 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Trove Of Artifacts Trumpets African-American Triumphs

Hence We Come, by Norman Lewis
Courtesy of The Kinsey Collection

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 5:44 pm

Seventeen-year-old Tonisha Owens stared wide-eyed at the faded script on an 1854 letter. It was once carried by another 17-year-old — a slave named Frances. The letter was written by a plantation owner's wife to a slave dealer, saying that she needed to sell her chambermaid to pay for horses. But Frances didn't know how to read or write, and didn't know what she carried.

"She does not know she is to be sold. I couldn't tell her," the letter reads. "I own all her family and the leave taking would be so distressing that I could not."

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NPR Story
10:54 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Pie Pops: Bite-sized 'Pocket Pies' On A Stick

Transcript

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NPR Story
10:54 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Saving Yourself From Thanksgiving T.M.I.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, a couple of days until Thanksgiving means just a short wait for pie. But instead of slicing it up this year, have you thought about putting it on a stick? Let us be the first to introduce you to pie pops. That's later. But first, you may get your fill of more than just dessert this holiday season. You might also be treated to a heaping helping of family news.

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NPR Story
10:54 am
Tue November 26, 2013

End-Of-Life Conversations Not Easy, But Necessary

A new report from the Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project shows that Americans' attitudes about medical care at the end of life are changing. And there's still widespread resistance to talking about the issue. Host Michel Martin learns more about the study's findings and how to have these conversations.

NPR Story
10:54 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Secretary Of Labor Says Raising Minimum Wage Will Grow Economy

U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez has only been in office for a few months, but he's already making waves. He's pushing for a higher minimum wage and immigration reform. Perez speaks with host Michel Martin about his goals for the U.S. labor force.

NPR Story
10:54 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Meet Mensch On A Bench, Jewish Counterpart To Elf On The Shelf

Courtesy of Neal Hoffman

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:27 pm

During a visit to a store last holiday season, Jewish father Neal Hoffman felt bad telling his son Jake that he couldn't have an Elf on the Shelf. The widely popular Christmas toy is intended to watch children's behavior for Santa. Hoffman kept thinking, maybe there could be something similar, but rooted in Jewish tradition.

Hoffman, a former Hasbro employee, decided Mensch on a Bench was the answer. "A mensch means a really good person. It's a person that you strive to be," he says.

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Code Switch
4:24 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

What Do We Mean When We Talk About 'Latino Art'?

Radiante, Olga Albizu
Courtesy of the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 5:42 pm

When the Whitney Museum of American Art announced the artists for its 2014 biennial, people took to the Internet to chime in about who's been included and who's been left out; the last biennial had been blasted for ignoring Latino artists. But when a new show opened at the Smithsonian American Art Museum featuring only Latino artists — "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" — it was blasted for other reasons.

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Code Switch
4:03 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

A History Of Indentured Labor Gives 'Coolie' Its Sting

Nine out of 10 workers on the transcontinental railroad were Chinese. These indentured laborers, derogatorily called "coolies," became a prime target for criticism in the mid-19th century.
Joseph Becker Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 4:45 pm

Each week, we take a look at a word or phrase that's caught our attention, whether for its history, usage, etymology, or just because it has an interesting story. You can see past "Word Watch" entries here.

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Africa
11:00 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Winnie: Not 'Just The Woman Who Stood By Mandela's Side'

Idris Elba (as Nelson Mandela) and Naomie Harris (as Winnie Mandela) in a scene from his trial.
Keith Bernstein The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 6:39 pm

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Movies
10:36 am
Mon November 25, 2013

From Morgan Freeman to Idris Elba, Who Played Mandela Best?

Many films have been made about Nelson Mandela. Danny Glover, Morgan Freeman, Dennis Haysbert, and now Idris Elba have all tried to step into the icon's shoes. Host Michel Martin speaks to Sean Jacobs, founder of the blog Africa Is A Country, about which actor played him best.

Books
10:36 am
Mon November 25, 2013

New Book Tries to Capture 'The Black Experience'

Transcript

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Education
10:36 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Reporters' Notebook: Philadelphia, A Laboratory For Hybrid Schools

Michel Martin talks with NPR education correspondents Claudio Sanchez and Eric Westervelt, about a new NPR series looking at problems within Philadelphia's public school system, and the lessons the rest of the country can take from Philly.

Education
10:36 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Is The STEM Education Crisis A Myth?

Education experts have been sounding the alarm for more students to go into STEM fields: science, technology, engineering and math. But some researchers suggest the STEM crisis is just a myth. Anthony Carnevale of The Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, tells host Michel Martin which side is right.

Code Switch
1:55 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Hollywood's New Strategy: Supporting Chinese-Made Blockbusters

Hollywood's version of Iron Man 3 shown in China played down the rather unfortunately named baddie, The Mandarin, played by Ben Kingsley.
Marvel

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 12:11 pm

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Code Switch
5:12 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Rev. T.J. Jemison Remembered As Civil Rights Movement Pioneer

The Rev. T.J. Jemison escorts Mary Briscoe (left) and Sandra Ann Jones from jail in Baton Rouge, La., on April 4, 1960. The two had been in jail as a result of lunch counter sit-ins.
AP

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 6:21 pm

The state of Louisiana is paying tribute Friday to the Rev. T.J. Jemison, a strong and steady voice against unequal treatment for blacks in the Jim Crow South.

Jemison's body lay in repose at the Louisiana State Capitol in Baton Rouge, where Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., said he will be remembered as one of the greats of the civil rights movement.

"He had such a heart and courage for justice," Landrieu said. "There are very few people in our state that will rise to that level of influence, and it is very appropriate that our Capitol was opened up for him today."

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