Code Switch

#NPRWIT: Women In Tech
1:10 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Nigeria's First Female Finance Minister: Still Big Problems In Soaring Economy

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 2:19 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Music
12:55 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Nollywood Filmmaker Sings To His 'African Queen'

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 2:19 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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World
12:54 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Paralympics In Full Swing In Sochi

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 2:19 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Code Switch
12:52 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

For Player At Center Of NFL Bullying Story, A New Opportunity

Jonathan Martin watched USC take on Stanford, his alma mater, after he abruptly walked away from the Miami Dolphins. Martin said that he left after he was relentlessly bullied by another Dolphins offensive lineman, Richie Incognito.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 2:52 pm

When Jonathan Martin abruptly left the Miami Dolphins in the middle of last season after alleging harassment by his teammate, Richie Incognito, it sparked media discussions about everything from the use of the word "nigger" in N.F.L. locker rooms to the construction of masculinity.

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Children's Health
12:51 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

In Syria, Not Just Bullets And Bombs Harming Children

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 2:19 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. The standoff in Ukraine may be a central concern of world leaders right now, but it is not the only one. This weekend will mark three years since the protests against the Syrian regime began. That conflict has now ballooned into a full-blown civil war and a devastating humanitarian crisis along with it. And as the fourth year of the crisis begins, the global nonprofit group Save the Children is trying to call attention to the plight of Syria's children.

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Around the Nation
12:51 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Juggling Work And Motherhood On A Shoestring Budget

Katrina Gilbert, a single mother raising Brooklynn, Trent and Lydia, says she got involved with an HBO documentary to inspire others.
Barbara Kinney/Courtesy of HBO

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 9:06 pm

There are more than 4 million American families living under the poverty line today that are led by a single mother. Katrina Gilbert is one of those moms.

Gilbert is a certified nursing assistant in Tennessee. To support her three children, she sometimes works seven days a week at a nursing home. But at $10 an hour, her paycheck doesn't go very far.

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Code Switch
10:14 am
Wed March 12, 2014

How The Vice President of New Afrika Became Mayor Of Jackson

Lots of former black activists made the move into elected office, but the late Chokwe Lumumba, a one-time nationalist, assumed office without moderating or distancing himself from his previous views.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Last week, the city of Jackson, Miss., paid its last respects to Chokwe Lumumba. And according to R.L. Nave of the Jackson Free Press, the affair was the kind of black nationalist/pan-Africanist celebration you might expect for one of the nation's most outspoken black activists:

They came in suits, dresses, dashikis and tunics.

They wore an assortment of headwear, everything from riding caps to berets, kufis, hijab and headwraps.

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Code Switch
7:36 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Changing Demographics A Factor In Rhode Island's Gubernatorial Race

Two supporters of gubernatorial candidate Gina Raimondo walk past protesting union members outside a rally at which Raimondo announced her run for the Democratic nomination in Rhode Island in January.
Michael Dwyer AP

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 11:06 am

Parades, social clubs and awards dinners are part of the routine of political campaigns everywhere. But if you're running to be Rhode Island's next governor, then there's one more stop you just can't miss.

Namely, the makeshift studios of Latino Public Radio, which is housed in a two-story, single-family home complete with a living room, dog and cat.

This local Spanish-language radio station based in Cranston, R.I., was co-founded almost a decade ago by Pablo Rodriguez.

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#NPRWIT: Women In Tech
11:50 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Investing In Women Entrepreneurs

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to start the program today by returning to our series of conversations about and with women in tech. All this month, which happens to be Women's History Month, we're hearing from innovators from around the world as they tweet a day in their lives using the hashtag #NPRWIT. We're also speaking with trailblazers about new ideas they're bringing to tech and how they're encouraging more women and girls to enter the field.

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Your Money
11:50 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Don't Get Caught In A Tax Scam

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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U.S.
11:50 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Fight Against Military Sexual Assault Hits New Milestone

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Code Switch
11:01 am
Tue March 11, 2014

These Cute Images Make Reading Chinese Characters 'Chineasy'

ShaoLan Hsueh worked with illustrators to develop pictograms that help readers learn Chinese characters.
Rick Pushinsky Courtesy of ShaoLan Hsueh

Growing up in Taiwan, ShaoLan Hsueh stuck out.

She liked writing in Chinese.

"I know all the children hated it, but I was a bit odd in that I loved writing Chinese characters," says Hsueh, the daughter of a Chinese calligrapher.

Now living in London, she later discovered that the love she had for Chinese language felt like "torture" to her two British-born children. "I found it really challenging to try to convince them that it's really cool to read Chinese," she said. "No one in their environment would be interested or have contact with Chinese-speaking people."

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Code Switch
10:50 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Undoing Segregation In A Slovakian School

The school in Šarišské Michaľany.
Sáša Woodruff

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 10:27 am

Two teams of teenage boys play soccer, while adults and younger children look on from wooden picnic benches on a grassy athletic field behind an elementary school. Later, there will be relay races, tug-of-war and dancing. The organizers are preparing a lunch of paprika-colored sauerkraut soup, bread and slices of watermelon. The motto of the day is "also sport can unite." Wobbly translation aside, the organizers are trying to make a point in this town in eastern Slovakia.

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Parenting
10:39 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Former Supernanny Jo Frost Takes On Toddler Years

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 3:17 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. Today, we want to focus on the toddler years. They are so cute, and they can be so frustrating. They finally learn words, but that word is often no.

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NPR Story
11:16 am
Mon March 10, 2014

The Gooey Chocolate Cookie Recipe That's Worth $5,000

Sally McKenney sallysbakingaddiction.com

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:26 pm

Sally McKenney is a self-described "sprinkle lover" and author of a new cookbook based on her popular blog Sally's Baking Addiction. She says baking doesn't have to be intimidating and wants her followers to experiment along with her.

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#NPRWIT: Women In Tech
11:15 am
Mon March 10, 2014

#NPRWIT Wants Your Ideas

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:23 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
11:15 am
Mon March 10, 2014

A Beauty Queen Steps Out Of The Closet

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:23 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Law
11:15 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Reconsidering Driver's License Suspensions As Punishment

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:23 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Children's Health
11:15 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Why Kids Leave The E.R. With Concussions

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Brain injuries like concussions have got a lot of attention in professional sports lately. But there's also a new focus on concussion in children, especially those who play sports at a young age. A new study suggests that emergency rooms could be doing much more to find and treat concussions in children. It's published online in the journal Pediatrics Today.

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Politics
11:15 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Political Rhetoric, From Energizing To Outrageous

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we turn to some of the latest political news. Conservatives recently got together for what some call a political pep rally. The annual Conservative Political Action Conference - or CPAC - that's where conservative leaders and potential presidential candidates test their best applause lines and build grassroots support. Before winning the event's presidential straw poll, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul energized the crowd with a speech on Friday.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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Code Switch
9:11 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Stokely Carmichael, A Philosopher Behind The Black Power Movement

Martin Luther King Jr., shown here with Stokely Carmichael during a voter registration march in Mississippi in 1966, regarded the younger Carmichael as one of the civil rights movement's most promising leaders.
Lynn Pelham Time

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 11:26 am

Before he became famous — and infamous — for calling on black power for black people, Stokely Carmichael was better known as a rising young community organizer in the civil rights movement. The tall, handsome philosophy major from Howard University spent summers in the South, working with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, known as SNCC, to get African-Americans in Alabama and Mississippi registered to vote in the face of tremendous, often violent resistance from segregationists.

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Code Switch
8:55 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Our Conversation On Race In 'World of Warcraft,' Unabridged

The Pandaren are a fairly new race in WoW — "giant pandas that belong to clans with Chinese-sounding names and lands filled with 'Asian' architecture," as one person told us — and they show how real-world racial notions creep into the game's universe.
Battle.net

World of Warcraft is trying to reduce racial inequality. Don't worry, this isn't about racial disparities between black, Latino and Asian players — we're talking about gnomes and trolls and orcs here.

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Code Switch
6:05 pm
Sun March 9, 2014

Who First Said 'Long Time, No See' And In Which Language?

Just how and why did the grammatically awkward phrase "long-time-no-see" become a widely accepted part of American speech?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 8:51 am

How many times has the average person been greeted with the phrase "long time, no see" after running into an old acquaintance? My guess is plenty. But how and why did such a grammatically awkward phrase become a widely accepted part of American speech?

It turns out there are, at least, two strong possibilities.

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Code Switch
9:57 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Black GOP Stars Rise In A Party That's Still Awkwardly White

With his outspoken conservative views, Dr. Ben Carson is a hit among Republicans. He spoke at the Conservative Political Action Conference last week.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 11:00 am

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul's straw poll victory at last week's Conservative Political Action Conference wasn't unexpected for the presidential contender. In third place, however, was a surprise finisher.

Dr. Ben Carson is one of a handful of black Republicans that conservatives are buzzing about this year. While the GOP has made strides in cultivating viable black candidates, the party still has difficulty resonating with black voters.

He may not have the rock-star status of top conservatives like Paul or Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, but Carson's following is growing.

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Code Switch
6:13 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Increased Hostility Against Jews And Roma In Hungary

People light candles during a commemoration to pay tribute to victims of a series of deadly attacks against Roma or Gipsy people in Budapest, Hungary, Feb. 23, 2012.
Zsolt Szigetvary AP

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 6:13 pm

Ahead of next month's parliamentary election in Hungary, a report published in February found the Roma minority in that Central European country face an unprecedented amount of violence and discrimination. While prejudice against Roma, pejoratively known as Gypsies, is widespread throughout Europe, the report says Hungary is more anti-immigrant and hostile toward minorities than elsewhere.

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Sat March 8, 2014

What World Of Warcraft Can Tell Us About Race In Real Life

"What's an orc gotta do to get a cab in this town???"
Blizzard Entertainment

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 9:27 am

World of Warcraft is trying to reduce racial inequality. Don't worry, this isn't about racial disparities between black, Latino and Asian players — we're talking about gnomes and trolls and orcs here.

Read more
Code Switch
1:50 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

A Native American Tribe Hopes Digital Currency Boosts Its Sovereignty

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 3:35 pm

There's a lot of talk about virtual currencies lately — how they work, economic implications and whether they're safe. But now a Native American tribe is using a bitcoin-like currency to help strengthen its sovereignty.

In South Dakota, the Oglala Lakota Nation has become the first Native American tribe to launch its own form of virtual currency. Payu Harris, its creator, calls it mazacoin.

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Barbershop
11:05 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Barbershop Guys Dig Into Hollywood Beef

Screenwriter John Ridley won an Oscar for 12 Years A Slave, but he's being criticized for an old essay about black people. The barbershop guys give their own speeches on the topic.

Economy
11:05 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Freezing Weather Put A Chill On Economy, Housing Market?

Spring is a big season for buying and selling homes, but the housing market has a lot of hurdles ahead. NPR's Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax talks about them and the latest job numbers.

History
11:05 am
Fri March 7, 2014

New Look At The Man Behind Black Power

Stokely Carmichel popularized one of the best known and most polarizing phrases of the civil rights era: "black power." Historian Peniel Joseph shares his new book Stokely: A Life.

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