Code Switch

Law
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

Howard Dean Bailey made a good life for himself in the U.S. But then, a decades-old run-in with the law led to his deportation. Does his story show the system failing or working?

Media
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

"Selfie" may have been the 2013 word of the year. But "belfies," or "butt selfies" are now in the spotlight. We learn more about why they earned a fitness model a spread in Vanity Fair magazine.

Code Switch
6:03 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Autism, Like Race, Complicates Almost Everything

Alicia Montgomery walks with her son near their home.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 11:40 am

Children have tantrums. They yell and grab at things that they should ask for nicely. And when a child has autism, like my son, these episodes can be epic: toys hurled across a room, screaming fits that last hours, and flurries of hitting that get triggered by even a minor change in a routine.

But when my son screams at his therapist and tries to snatch Magic Markers from his hands, I gasp. I think of Trayvon Martin.

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Remembrances
11:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Remembering A Defiant, Soaring Performance By Marian Anderson

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, let's end the program on a high note. Today marks 75 years since Marian Anderson, the African-American contralto, took to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to sing.

Anderson was supposed to sing at the Daughters of the American Revolution Constitution Hall, but she was barred from performing there because she was black. Let's listen to a bit of Marian Anderson's performance from April 9, 1939.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

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Can I Just Tell You?
11:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Are Student Athletes Really Students Too?

Host Michel Martin asks whether college athletes are getting the education they are supposed to.

Economy
11:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Will Disclosing Employee Information Make Wages More Equal?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'd like to start the program today by talking about an issue that's been a hot topic on Capitol Hill lately. That issue is pay equity. The Democrats have been trying to push legislation through Congress to address what they say is a gender wage gap where women earn less than men for the same work. Yesterday, President Obama signed two orders aimed at closing that gap.

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Code Switch
1:45 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Coming Out In Basketball: How Brittney Griner Found 'A Place Of Peace'

Brittney Griner puts up a shot against Japan during a 2013 preseason WNBA game in Phoenix.
Christian Petersen Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:24 am

Brittney Griner is 23 years old, 6 feet 8 inches tall and one of the best female basketball players in the world. She was the WNBA top draft pick last year, and in college she set records for the most blocked shots in a season and the most career blocks in history — for male and female players. She's so good that the owner of a men's team — the Dallas Mavericks — has said he'd recruit her.

Now, Griner is also an author. She's co-written a new memoir, In My Skin, in which she describes being bullied and taunted as a kid for her height and athleticism.

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Code Switch
12:23 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

For Poetry Month, We're Taking To Twitter — And We Want Your Help

According to iStockphoto, these floating letters "symbolize the idea of literature." Sure. We'll just roll with that.
iStockphoto

Help us make poetry!

April is National Poetry Month: 30 days set aside for the celebration of all things verse. Many of us here at Code Switch love poetry every month of the year, but we can't always make space for it in our coverage.

So this month, we're taking advantage of the national celebration and highlighting great poets and poems that address issues of race, ethnicity and culture.

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Parenting
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Vaccinating Children: Who Gets To Decide?

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:49 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

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My Big Break
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Ken Jeong, Leaving Medicine For Movies

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:49 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

You might have heard that some of our listeners actually joined Twitter just to participate in our Twitter poetry series. You might call it their big break into poetry. Well, our colleagues at All Things Considered have been hearing stories from a number of people about the moment when their careers in other fields took off.

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Money Coach
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Prepaid Debit Cards Not As Simple As They Seem

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:49 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our money coach conversation. That's the part of the program where we talk about the economy and personal finance.

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Law
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Not Guilty Verdict Can Still Lead To Ruined Lives

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:49 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This year marks the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson's war on poverty. So throughout 2014, we're talking about what poverty looks like in American now. We're asking things like who is most likely to be poor today, and what affect does poverty have on people's lives? And we're hearing different ideas about solutions.

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#TMMPoetry: Muses and Metaphor
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Creating An Ecosystem In 140 Characters

Dennis Macdonald Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:36 pm

For Tell Me More's second week of Muses and Metpahor poet Holly Bass stopped by to talk about her teen writing initiative at a Washington, D.C. detention center. Bass has been working with her students to create poems that are 140-characters or less. She shared how she inspires them to navigate the sometimes difficult limitation.

"I tell them to just write a whole poem and then you can take one line or two lines from that poem and turn that into your Twitter poem" Bass told Tell Me More's Michel Martin.

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Code Switch
10:30 am
Tue April 8, 2014

It's Our Anniversary! Tell Us How We're Doing

Once again, we expect our impeccable use (and reuse!) of stock photos is clearly among your favorite aspects of Code Switch.
iStockphoto.com

One year ago today, Code Switch launched with the post "How Code-Switching Explains The World." Last June, we released our first Code Switch visitors survey to query our users about what they were seeing, what they liked, and what they liked less. We're long overdue for a follow-up.

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Code Switch
10:02 am
Tue April 8, 2014

How Stereotypes Explain Everything And Nothing At All

The City College of New York basketball team in 1932.
New York Daily News Archive New York Daily News via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 3:46 pm

A few days ago, I wrote a post in which I was mulling just why so few Asian-Americans played Division I basketball. The numbers were striking: of the 5,380 men's players in the top tier of college basketball during the 2012-2013 season, only 15 were Asian-American. Asian-American ballers weren't just underrepresented. They were practically invisible.

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Code Switch
6:33 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Chuck Stone, Pioneering Black Journalist And Professor, Dies At 89

Chuck Stone poses in the newsroom of the Philadelphia Daily News on Feb. 15, 1984.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:40 pm

When Chuck Stone worked at the Philadelphia Daily News, staffers for the newspaper got used to calls from reception telling them a person the police were pursuing as violent and criminal was waiting to talk to Stone. The suspects trusted Stone but feared police brutality. The veteran newsman would talk to the accused, take the accused's photo to show he was intact and then call the police.

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Music Interviews
11:58 am
Mon April 7, 2014

LiV Warfield Lets Her 'Unexpected' Voice Out

NPR

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:20 pm

Growing up, LiV Warfield's friends and family had no inkling that the track athlete could sing and write songs. But when she moved away from home, the artist inside her came out.

That hidden talent now has her in the spotlight; recently she's been on stage at the Late Show with David Letterman and Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. Her sound has been described as edgy and soulful. And her lyrical prowess has landed her support from music luminaries like Prince.

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Remembrances
11:34 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Chuck Stone Remembered For More Than His Newspaper Columns

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:20 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to pause now to remember a gifted journalist and activist and journalism professor. Charles Sumner Stone Jr., or Chuck Stone as he was more popularly known, died on Sunday in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. He was 89 years old. After serving as a Tuskegee Airman, Stone dedicated himself to journalism, working at many of the influential black newspapers that were prominent during the civil rights era, such as the Chicago Defender and the New York Age.

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Law
11:34 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Cocaine Case Puts Spotlight On Fetal Harm Prosecutions

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:20 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we turn to a case that may have implications for how the law treats pregnant women. A Mississippi judge has thrown out a murder charge against Rennie Gibbs. The charge came after Gibbs, then 16 years old, gave birth to a stillborn child. That was in 2006.

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U.S.
10:54 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Fort Hood Shooting: No Simple Link To Mental Illness

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:20 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We'd like to start off the program today by reflecting on last week's shooting at Fort Hood, Texas that left four people dead and injured 16 others, many of them seriously. We now know that the shooter was 34-year-old Army Specialist Ivan Lopez.

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Race
9:44 am
Sun April 6, 2014

#CancelColbert Let Asian-Americans Call Out The Real Ding-Dongs

Stephen Colbert responded to criticism about a tweet about his show from his TV network last Monday, saying he would dismantle the imaginary foundation that created the stir.
Comedy Central

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 1:20 pm

It surely says something about our culture that a single tweet can turn into a major racial incident.

You've likely heard the flap over comedian Stephen Colbert's send-up of Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder's new foundation to help Native Americans.

The controversy erupted when a Twitter account associated with Colbert's show, The Colbert Report, took the joke too far — away from its original context.

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Code Switch
4:18 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Stereotypes Of Appalachia Obscure A Diverse Picture

Frank Cedillo fishes in a Greenville, Tenn., lake.
Courtesy of Megan King

Originally published on

Children in sepia-toned clothes with dirt-smeared faces. Weathered, sunken-eyed women on trailer steps chain-smoking Camels. Teenagers clad in Carhartt and Mossy Oak loitering outside of long-shuttered businesses.

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Code Switch
7:10 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Who Will Replace Letterman? Probably Another White Guy

We might have diversity in the White House, but our late night show hosts are still predominantly white.
Brendan Smialowsky AFP/Getty Images

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Sat April 5, 2014

Cesar Chavez Film Faces Criticism For Not Being Chicano Enough

Director Diego Luna arrives at the premiere of Cesar Chavez on March 20 in Los Angeles.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 3:49 pm

In the little more than a week since the Cesar Chavez movie came out, there have been as many complaints as kudos for the handling of the complex story about the Mexican-American union organizer and civil rights leader.

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Barbershop
11:20 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Letterman Lets It Go

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 11:31 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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Movie Interviews
11:20 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Anthony Mackie Soars As Captain America's Falcon

Anthony Mackie as Falcon and Chris Evans as Captain America.
Marvel Studios

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 11:31 am

Movie lovers probably already know Anthony Mackie from supporting but meaty roles in the Oscar-winning films 8 Mile, Million Dollar Baby and The Hurt Locker. But now he heads to the Marvel Universe in the new action film Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Mackie plays the Falcon, also known as Sam Wilson, a former military paratrooper skilled in air combat. He teams up with Captain America to face the legendary assassin known as the Winter Soldier.

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Faith Matters
11:20 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Finding Peace After Genocide

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 11:31 am

It has been 20 years since the start of the Rwandan genocide. Reverend Celestin Musekura lost congregation members in the bloodshed. He discusses how faith has helped foster reconciliation.

Politics
11:20 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Enrollment Numbers Put Obamacare Battle To Rest?

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 11:31 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Now it's time for our political chat. This week there's a lot to talk about. The Supreme Court struck down some campaign contribution limits. The White House beat it's a goal of 7 million Americans signed up for coverage through the Affordable Care Act, and Republican Congressman Paul Ryan debuted his own budget proposal, something that could be a blueprint for a White House run in 2016. So joining us to help us unpack those political headlights is Corey Dade.

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Code Switch
6:06 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Who's Boosting Box Office Numbers? Report Says Latinos

Cesar Chavez pulled in $3 million at the box office last weekend and did noticeably better in areas where the farmworkers advocate was most active.
Courtesy of Lionsgate

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 7:27 pm

According to a recent report published by the Motion Picture Association of America, Latinos went to the movies in 2013 way more often than other ethnic groups in the U.S. relative to their population.

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Code Switch
3:31 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Sit Next To Rosa Parks At The National Civil Rights Museum

The Montgomery Bus Boycott exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum features a vintage city bus. Visitors can go inside the bus and sit next to a figure of Rosa Parks.
Christopher Blank WKNO

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 9:13 am

In 1991, the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., became America's first major museum to paint a broad picture of the civil rights movement. Its content hasn't changed much since then. But this Saturday after a nearly $28 million renovation that took 18 months, the museum will reopen with a new design that aims to appeal to an older generation as well as a post-civil-rights-era audience.

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