Code Switch

Code Switch
10:45 am
Tue December 31, 2013

As 2013 Winds To An End, So Do The Tweets Of 1963

The limousine carrying mortally-wounded President John F. Kennedy races toward Parkland Hospital in Dallas just seconds after he was shot.
Justin Newman AP

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 11:30 am

As 2013 winds down, so does @Todayin1963, Code Switch's historical Twitter account. Since June, I've been "live-tweeting" moments from 50 years ago as if they were happening today, picking slices of that year that might have made their ways into people's Twitter timelines had tweeting been a thing back then.

It's been an obsessive project, to say the least.

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Code Switch
6:08 am
Tue December 31, 2013

2013 Signoffs II: More Short Stories About Remarkable Lives

1972's Solid Rock was the first album to feature the Temptations' new additions, Damon Harris and Richard Street. They got top placement on the album cover.
Motown Records

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 11:09 am

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Code Switch
3:41 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

2013 Signoffs: Short Stories About A Few Remarkable Lives

Los Angeles poet Wanda Coleman's writing often drew from her struggles as a black woman. She died at age 67 in November.
Chris Felver Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 5:31 pm

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Code Switch
2:50 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Why Being 'Gypped' Hurts The Roma More Than It Hurts You

The Three Stooges movie Gypped In the Penthouse is one of many pieces of media that uses the pejorative.
Columbia Pictures

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 10:13 am

I never thought about the etymology of the verb "gypped" until the end of college, when my friend, lamenting his stolen iPod, said the word and immediately retracted it. "Isn't that offensive?" he wondered. Until that moment, I had never thought about it either. What sparked our unease was the sudden realization that "gypped" was somehow tied to "gypsy."

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Code Switch
11:45 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Make It So: Sir Patrick Stewart Moos In Udder Accents

A Jersey cow enjoys the sunshine in Jersey, one of the British Channel Islands.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 7:06 am

Cow-d it really be? Have our ears herd this correctly? (Sorry, I can't help myself.)

Patrick Stewart — ahem, Sir Patrick Stewart — mooed up a storm on the podcast How To Do Everything, impersonating cows from various regions. You might even say Stewart was code-switching.

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Around the Nation
10:52 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Son Offers Advice For Keeping Promises

New Years' resolutions, whether they're about family, money or health, are often forgotten in a matter of weeks. Now a social entrepreneur is encouraging people to keep their promises all year long. Host Michel Martin speaks with Alex Sheen, the founder of the group, Because I Said I Would.

Africa
10:52 am
Mon December 30, 2013

South Sudan Violence: 'The Stories They Tell Are Horrible'

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Happy holidays to you, and thanks to my colleague Celeste Headlee for sitting in for me while I was away. With New Year's around the corner, you might be thinking about New Year's resolutions. We'll meet a young man who's made keeping his promises a year-round commitment. We'll hear from him and how he's inspiring others to do the same thing. That's later. But we want to start the program today by bringing you up to date on developments in the world's newest country, South Sudan.

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Music Interviews
10:52 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Muslim Pop Star Yuna Climbs The U.S. Charts

Yuna doesn't just make music but also runs a fashion boutique where she sells funky but modest clothes.
Autumn de Wilde

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 3:43 pm

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Music
10:52 am
Mon December 30, 2013

New Rendition of Woody Guthrie's 'Deportee' Song

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 3:51 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Race
10:52 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Redefining Philanthropy: How African-Americans Give Back

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation released a study in 2012 showing that African-Americans give a larger share of their income to charities than any other group. Tracey Webb, founder of The Black Benefactors and BlackGivesBack.com, talks to host Michel Martin about African-American philanthropy.

Code Switch
2:21 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Films With Black Actors, Directors Go To 11 In 2013

Monica Calhoun (left), Melissa De Sousa and Nia Long star in The Best Man Holiday, one of this year's eleven top-grossing films starring black actors and by black directors.
Michael Gibson Universal Pictures

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 10:33 am

As we near the end of 2013, NPR is taking a look at the numbers that tell the story of this year — numbers that, if you really understand them, give insight into the world we're living in, right now. You'll hear the stories behind numbers ranging from zero to 1 trillion.

When it comes to race and film, the number of the year is 11.

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Code Switch
2:28 pm
Sat December 28, 2013

Muslim 'Hipsters' Turn A Joke Into A Serious Conversation

The YouTube video "Somewhere in America," featuring diverse Muslim women wearing hijab, immediately sparked strong reactions — both positive and negative.
Sheikh and Bake Productions YouTube

It started off as a joke, calling themselves Mipsterz, which is short for Muslim hipsters.

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Code Switch
11:33 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Harlem In Photographs: Troubled Neighborhood To Source Of Pride

Camilo José Vergara's new book is titled Harlem: The Unmaking of a Ghetto.
Camilo José Vergara

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 1:06 pm

When Camilo José Vergara first began taking photos in Harlem in 1970, he expected to be documenting the deterioration of the historic neighborhood. In some ways he has. But over the decades, he also saw changes in Harlem that weren't so stark — growth, gentrification and racial integration.

His new book, Harlem: The Unmaking of a Ghetto, shows more than 40 years of change in the capital of African-American culture.


Interview highlights

On working in dangerous environments

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NPR Story
11:33 am
Fri December 27, 2013

2013 Under-The-Radar Stories From The Barbershop Guys

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 10:26 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Architecture
11:33 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Architect's Dream House: Less Than 200 Square Feet

Macy Miller

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 12:35 pm

You might think going through a divorce and losing your home to foreclosure would be hard to bounce back from, and they are, but Tell Me More caught up with a woman who beat the odds and built a new home for herself.

Macy Miller, an architect from Idaho, built the home with her own two hands at a cost of only $11,000. The house is less than 200 square feet.


Interview Highlights

On building the home

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Economy
11:33 am
Fri December 27, 2013

2013 A Good Year For Housing And Auto Industries

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Journalists — Of Color! — To Watch In 2014

Fusion is gambling on Alicia Menendez, who has been a fixture on cable news but has never hosted a news show.
Wilfredo Lee AP

You can set your watch to it: If it's the end of the year, journalists are putting together their obligatory lists. And often when someone decides to cobble together a list of the "35 Blanks Under 35 To Watch For," the list is monochromatic. So it went with Politico's "10 Journalists to Watch in 2014," which boasted nary a single person of color.

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Code Switch
2:25 pm
Thu December 26, 2013

Cooking In A Latin-Jewish Melting Pot

Rebecca Lehrer thought that chicken soup with lime and cilantro was the way every Jewish family made it.
Courtesy of Rebecca Lehrer

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 3:16 pm

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Arts & Life
9:21 am
Thu December 26, 2013

The Surprising Vision of Artist Faith Ringgold

Legendary artist Faith Ringgold began her career in 1963 — the same year as the March on Washington. She talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about her life, work and why no one originally wanted to hear her story.

Africa
9:21 am
Thu December 26, 2013

Revealing The Sometimes Ugly Truth Of Nigeria

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 6:16 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
9:20 am
Thu December 26, 2013

Struggling Food Banks Find New Ways To Fight Hunger

Food banks are struggling to provide dwindling supplies to a bigger base of recipients. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Bloomberg Businessweek contributor Roben Farzad about how food banks are coming up with new ways to feed the hungry.

Education
9:20 am
Thu December 26, 2013

How To Create Cheat-Free Classrooms

Most high school students say they've cheated on a test in the past year, and even more say they've copied homework or other assignments, according to a recent survey. Author Jessica Lahey says it isn't all the students' fault. Lahey and Professor James Lang speak with guest host Celeste Headlee about creating cheat-free classrooms.

Books
9:19 am
Thu December 26, 2013

Civil Rights Turmoil In Verse: Retelling Medgar Evers' Story

Medgar Evers was the first NAACP field secretary in Mississippi. The civil rights leader was killed in 1963.
AP

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 9:46 am

A new book of poetry narrates the life and death of civil rights leader Medgar Evers through a series of imagined monologues. Evers was the first NAACP field secretary in Mississippi. In that role, he organized boycotts, investigated and brought attention to the murder of Emmett Till, and helped James Meredith integrate the University of Mississippi.

Evers was gunned down in his Jackson, Miss., driveway by KKK leader Byron De La Beckwith in 1963. But it took more than 30 years for De La Beckwith to be convicted of his murder.

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Wed December 25, 2013

The Best Of Code Switch In 2013

Like many Japanese-Americans, Yuri Kochiyama was place in an internment camp during World War II. She became an outspoken civil rights activist, and began an unlikely friendship with Malcolm X.
Courtesy of the Kochiyama family/UCLA Asian American Studies Center

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 6:19 pm

Everyone else is doing their year-end lists, and we didn't want to be left out. The Code Switch crew compiled our favorite and best-received coverage from the past year: a novel revisiting of a pivotal year a half century ago; attending homecoming at a historically black college that is now nearly all-white; and rounding up some alternately hilarious and excruciating stories our readers told us about race.

When Our Kids Own America

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Helping Deaf Fans Feel The Music, Too

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 9:30 am

For most people, attending a concert is all about hearing the sounds of a live performance. But sign language interpreter Holly Maniatty makes concerts an experience for the hearing impaired too. She's worked with performers like Jay-Z, Bruce Springsteen, Phish and the Wu Tang Clan.

Arts & Life
1:06 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

How Blind Voice Over Artist 'Reads'

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 9:30 am

Pete Gustin has voiced over national ads but he can't read scripts - he's legally blind. As he tells Tell Me More guest host Celeste Headlee, he didn't let his disability deter his talent.

Music
1:06 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

At 60, Oliver Mtukudzi Still 'Giving Life To The People' With Music

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 9:30 am

Zimbabwean musician Oliver Mtukudzi often says that you don't get to sing a song if you have nothing to say. He talks with guest host Celeste Headlee, and shares a few tunes.

Music
1:06 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

Musician Oliver Mtukudzi Digs Deep In 'Sarawoga'

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 9:30 am

At 60, Zimbabwean musician Oliver Mtukudzi now has more albums to his name than birthdays. His latest, Sarawoga, is an emotional response to the death of his son. Mtukudzi joins guest host Celeste Headlee in studio for a special performance chat.

Health
1:06 pm
Tue December 24, 2013

After A Cancer Diagnosis, Lessons In Priorities

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 9:30 am

Teaching high school English came naturally to David Menasche but a terminal brain cancer diagnosis forced him to leave the classroom. So he visited some of his former students to see what impact he's had on them. He writes about the experience in his forthcoming book, The Priority List.

Food
11:00 am
Tue December 24, 2013

Spicing Up Your Holiday Drink List

General Harrison's Eggnog No. 3
David Kressler

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 1:24 pm

When it comes to holiday drinks, there's always the traditional recipes for mulled wine and eggnog. But what about a taste of something new and different?

James Beard Award-winning mixologist Dale DeGroff has some surprising ideas to spice up your drink menu this season. He is widely credited with reviving the art of the cocktail. He's also president and founder of the Museum of the American Cocktail.

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