Code Switch

NPR Story
10:50 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Grad Students Struggle To Pay School Loans While Still Studying

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:28 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. It's spring, a time of new beginnings, but for many students, time for big decisions about college admissions and aid. So this season we're joining our colleagues at Morning Edition to bring you stories about paying for college. We'd like to try to help you navigate that higher education money maze. Today, though, we want to focus on financing graduate school.

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NPR Story
10:50 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Equal Employment Agency No Longer Turning Away Gay Discrimination Claims

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:28 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Wed April 2, 2014

Why Aren't Asian-Americans Getting Their 'One Shining Moment'?

Jeremy Lin cast a long shadow in this conversation, in part because there are so few Asian-American players to cast them.
Fred Beckham AP

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:33 am

While we were looking at some NCAA stats on student athletes for a story last week, we came across a couple of numbers that made our eyes bulge: of the 5,380 men's basketball players in Division I basketball last season, only 15 were Asian-American. Fifteen.

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Code Switch
6:58 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

The Harlem Hellfighters: Fighting Racism In The Trenches Of WWI

The Harlem Hellfighters, a new graphic novel by Max Brooks, retells the story of the first African-American unit to fight in World War I.
Caanan White Courtesy of Broadway Books

The 369th Infantry Regiment served 191 days under enemy fire in Europe. They returned home one of the most decorated American units of World War I.

"The French called them the 'Men of Bronze' out of respect, and the Germans called them the 'Harlem Hellfighters' out of fear," explains Max Brooks, author of The Harlem Hellfighters, a new graphic novel about the first African-American infantry unit to fight in World War I.

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Code Switch
5:27 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

In #CancelColbert, A Firestorm And A Lost Opportunity

A joke Stephen Colbert made on his show last week was retweeted by Comedy Central. The joke — shorn of its context because, well, Twitter — sparked an online firestorm, and the hashtag #CancelColbert.
Comedy Central

At first, the idea of canceling The Colbert Report over a wayward tweet sounded like handing out the death penalty for a speeding ticket.

And as much as I understand the notion of using a provocative hashtag to fuel an important conversation, the #CancelColbert controversy mostly shows the difficulty of deciding just how offensive a joke based in stereotypes really is.

And there's a more important question: Once you determine something awful happened, how does it get fixed?

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BackTalk
10:09 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Listeners Weigh In On Parents Using Physical Discipline

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 11:26 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to turn to Backtalk. That's where we hear from you about to the week's stories. And it happens that we got a very spirited response to last week's parenting conversation about physical discipline. Editor Amita Parashar Kelly joins us now to review some of those comments. Welcome back, Amita.

AMITA PARASHAR KELLY, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

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Parenting
10:08 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Taking Your Kid To The Museum Doesn't Have To Be Miserable

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 11:26 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Arts & Life
10:08 am
Tue April 1, 2014

'Muses And Metaphor' Kicks Off National Poetry Month

Melanie Taube

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 4:26 pm

Tell Me More kicks off its annual ode to poetry month with the Muses and Metaphor series.

Throughout April we'll feature Twitter poems submitted by NPR fans and hear from poets and writers from all over the country.

But to shake things up, regular contributors to Tell Me More's Beauty Shop, Barbershop and Political Chats are also trying their hands at verses and rhymes while following the submissions on Twitter.

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Race
10:08 am
Tue April 1, 2014

How African-Americans See Their Lives

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 11:26 am

The well-being of the black family has been the subject of public debate. Ebony and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation are out with the Survey of African American Families. Tell Me More takes a look.

Law
10:06 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Rap Lyrics In Court: Art Vs. Evidence

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 11:26 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Almost as long as there has been rap music, it's been debated whether rap is art, and you can talk among yourselves about that later.

But now there is another debate. The issue is, is rap evidence - that is to say can rap lyrics be used as evidence in a criminal proceeding. In Virginia, prosecutors hope these lyrics by Antwain Steward, known as Twain Gotti, will help convict the rapper of double homicide. Here it this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HIP FULL OF GUN")

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Code Switch
2:07 am
Tue April 1, 2014

For Native Americans, Losing Tribal Membership Tests Identity

Some of the 79 people told by the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde that they were enrolled in error. Seated on the floor are Russell Wilkinson (left) and Mia Prickett. Seated second row (from left) are Nina Portwood-Shields, Jade Unger, Marilyn Portwood, Eric Bernando, Debi Anderson and Val Alexander. Standing are Antoine Auger (left) and Erin Bernando.
Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 11:04 am

In western Oregon, members of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde are engaged in a debate over what it means to belong.

The tribe's enrollment committee is considering kicking out an entire family that traces its lineage back to the founding of the modern tribe more than a century and a half ago. The family is related to Chief Tumulth, leader of the Watlala, a tribe that controlled river traffic along a key section of the Columbia River.

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Code Switch
2:05 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Lending Circles Help Latinas Pay Bills And Invest

Alicia Villanueva gives change to a customer at Off the Grid, a weekly street-food market in San Francisco.
Sarah Peet Sarah Peet Photography

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 7:50 am

As part of its Changing Lives of Women series, Morning Edition is exploring women and their relationship with money: saving, purchasing and investing for themselves and their families.

Cuban-American Barb Mayo describes a tanda like this: "It's like a no-interest loan with your friends." Mayo had never heard of tandas growing up, and it wasn't until she started working in sales for a cable company in Southern California that she was introduced to the concept.

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Music
10:11 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Hill Harper Moves To 'Fire And Desire'

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:36 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we hear from a man who says a relationship he built with a prison inmate changed his own life for the better. Actor Hill Harper documented his friendship and the advice he shared in his book "Letters to an Incarcerated Brother." When we spoke with him about the book last year, we also spoke with him for the regular feature we call In Your Ear. That's where we invite some of our guests to tell us about the songs they've been listening to. And he told us about what he listens to when he wants to unwind.

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Behind Closed Doors
10:11 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Reconnecting With Your Roots And The Cost Of Keeping Them Hidden

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:36 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
10:11 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Stories From The U.S.-Mexico Border

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:36 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. You might've heard that our colleague, Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep, and a team of producers traveled along the entire U.S.-Mexico border. Along the way, they've brought us stories of the people, the products and the cultural ideas that travel across the border. We had to get a piece of this for ourselves, so we asked Steve Inskeep to come on by. And he's with us now. Welcome. Thanks so much for joining us.

STEVE INSKEEP, BYLINE: Oh, delighted to be here.

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NPR Story
10:11 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Indian Classical Music Meets Beat Box In 'Exit 1'

Violinist Nistha Raj and beat boxer Christylez Bacon perform the song "Shivranjani" in NPR's Studio One.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 2:07 pm

When you think of Indian classical music, you probably don't expect to hear beat box, or strains of jazz, and even rock. But that's exactly what Nistha Raj is all about. The violinist is mixing classical Hindustani music with modern sounds to bring it to a new generation of music lovers. Her debut album is titled Exit 1.

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Code Switch
8:26 pm
Sun March 30, 2014

The Journey From 'Colored' To 'Minorities' To 'People Of Color'

Can race and ethnicity be represented by the colors found in a crayon box?
lilivanili Flickr

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 3:00 pm

Language is and always will be an essential element in the struggle for understanding among peoples. Changes in the words and phrases we use to describe each other reflect whatever progress we make on the path toward a world where everyone feels respected and included.

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Code Switch
3:34 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Activists: We Want An Emancipator, Not A 'Deporter In Chief'

Members of a coalition of Latino groups rally outside the Federal Building in Los Angeles on Wednesday. Activists say they plan more rallies and demonstrations across the country to push for action on immigration reform.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 5:59 pm

Activists who support an overhaul of the immigration system are angry and frustrated. The immigration bill that passed in the Senate in June is stalled out. Meanwhile, the Obama administration is on pace to deport some 2 million illegal immigrants since taking office six years ago.

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Code Switch
5:34 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Why A Proper Lady Found Herself Behind Bars

Mary Peabody leaves the dining room of a motel in St. Augustine, Fla., on March 31, 1964, after being arrested.
Harold Valentine AP

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 9:55 pm

This story is part of NPR's 50th anniversary coverage of 1964.

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Barbershop
10:55 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Colbert Went Too Far Or Viewers Can't Take A Joke?

Stephen Colbert is in hot water for his parody of the Washington Redskins Original Americans Foundation. Now the #CancelColbert hashtag is trending. Did he go too far? The Barbershop guys weigh in.

Faith Matters
10:55 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Asian-American Rabbi Changes The Face Of Judaism

New York's Central Synagogue is one of the most prominent synagogues in the country, and its new leader is going to be an Asian-American woman. Rabbi Angela Warnick Buchdal shares her story.

Health
10:55 am
Fri March 28, 2014

West Africans Worried About Ebola Outbreak

The deadly Ebola outbreak in the West African country of Guinea has reached the nation's capital. Now healthcare officials are scrambling for answers. Dr. Armand Sprecher explains.

Afghanistan
10:55 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Afghanistan Getting New Leader, But Don't Expect Karzai To Disappear

Afghanistan could pick a leader to replace Hamid Karzai next week, but Taliban members are ramping up attacks. Al Jazeera's Abderrahim Foukara talks about the elections and the future of Afghanistan.

Code Switch
3:58 am
Fri March 28, 2014

In 'Cesar Chavez,' A Reluctant Hero Fights For 'La Causa'

Michael Peña plays Cesar Chavez in the film about the activist.
Courtesy of Lionsgate

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:12 am

Cesar Chavez, the late farmworker advocate and union activist, remains one of the most well-known Latino leaders. He inspired the Chicano movement in the 1960s and '70s, and is depicted in countless murals throughout the West.

There are schools, streets and libraries named after him. There's a movement to make his birthday, March 31, a national day of service. And now, Chavez is being celebrated in a new feature film that opens Friday.

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Code Switch
6:03 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Latinos Live Longer But Struggle To Save Enough For Retirement

Isaias Hernandez (left) counsels Paul Garcia on his finances at the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation in Montebello, Calif.
Courtesy of the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 2:26 pm

Many American workers find themselves financially unprepared for retirement. Among racial and ethnic groups, Latinos are the least prepared.

They're one of the fastest-growing racial or ethnic groups, and they have a longer life expectancy than whites and blacks — at about 81 years old.

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Code Switch
1:23 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Poll Finds Big Racial Gap On Compensating College Athletes

Northwestern University quarterback Kain Colter has been leading a push to start a union for college athletes.
Paul Beaty AP

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:23 pm

A decision yesterday by the National Labor Relations Board found that football players at Northwestern University were, in effect, employees of their school. That means that Northwestern players can move forward with plans to form a union — a move that sent shock waves through the world of college athletics, even though it's too early to know just what it will mean.

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Sports
10:55 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Can Coats Quiet Controversy Over Football Team Name?

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:59 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Movie Interviews
10:55 am
Thu March 27, 2014

For Actor Michael Peña, A Transformative Role As Cesar Chavez

Michael Pena as Cesar Chavez
Pantelion Films

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:59 am

The new film Cesar Chavez brings to life the famed civil rights leader, who organized farm laborers and fought to secure a living wage and better working conditions in the fields. He founded the United Farm Workers union in California in 1962, and his work inspired millions of people in the U.S. and internationally. Actor Michael Peña, who plays Chavez, spoke with Tell Me More host Michel Martin about how he prepared for the role and what it meant to him and his family.

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Sports
10:54 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Boxed In, Then Leaving NFL At Age 26

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:59 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Sports
10:53 am
Thu March 27, 2014

One Step Closer To Nation's First College Athletes' Union

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:59 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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