Code Switch

Code Switch
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

In Asian-Majority District, House Race Divides Calif. Voters

Rep. Mike Honda (left) walks down the House steps with Rep. Raul Ruiz after a vote at the Capitol on March 20, 2013.
Bill Clark CQ-Roll Call

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:52 pm

In the heated race for a congressional seat in northern California, Mai Xuan Nguyen fought for her candidate with another cold call.

"Yes, that's K, H, A, N, N, A," she patiently explained in Vietnamese to a potential voter, spelling out her choice for Congress, Democrat Ro Khanna, as she marked her call list one recent evening at a coffeehouse in San Jose, Calif.

It was all part of Nguyen's role in an only-in-America scene: a Vietnamese-language phone bank for an Indian-American lawyer, who's challenging a Japanese-American congressman.

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Code Switch
5:43 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

A Legume With Many Names: The Story Of 'Goober'

Crunchy, salty, delicious goobers. Sure, you could call them "peanuts." But why would you pass up the chance to say "goober"?
Danielle Segura Flickr

Goodness, how delicious, eating goober peas!

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Code Switch
4:12 am
Sun April 20, 2014

The Golden Arch Of The Universe Is Long ...

McDonald's ad, 1972.
Ebony Magazine

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 8:42 am

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Code Switch
7:12 am
Sat April 19, 2014

In Silicon Valley, Immigrants Toast Their Way To The Top

Engineer Mit Shah gives a speech at a meeting of the "ArtICCulators" Toastmasters Club in Milpitas, Calif.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 11:18 am

Public speaking can be nerve-wracking whatever your native tongue. It can be especially difficult for immigrants who speak English as a second language.

In California's Silicon Valley, some immigrant tech workers strengthen their voices by joining public speaking support groups like Toastmasters clubs.

Members usually meet once a week to practice giving speeches, which are timed to the second and judged for grammar and presentation. There's even a designated counter of ums and ahs.

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Code Switch
3:58 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Playwright Phillip Hayes Dean Dies At 83

Courtesy of Craig Schwartz Photography

Playwright Phillip Hayes Dean died earlier this week. His family says the 83 year-old died in Los Angeles of a heart condition. He was in the midst of overseeing a production of his most famous play, "Paul Robeson."

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Barbershop
10:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Should College Dropouts Be Honored By Their Alma Maters?

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Faith Matters
10:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Gefilte Fish Shortage: Best Thing Since The Parting Of The Red Sea?

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Speaking of religion still, if there's one thing that goes hand-in-hand with faith, it is generally food. There have been a number of different food shortages in this country you may have heard about lately. We reported on this program about the shortage of limes. We've seen reports of rising beef prices as well. But right now, during Passover, gefilte fish is in short supply. Matt Chaban joins us now from member station WESA in Pittsburgh. He wrote about this for the New York Times. Matt, welcome.

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Faith Matters
10:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

New York's Muslims Push For Public Schools To Close For Eid Holidays

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we turn to a campaign to recognize Muslim religious holidays in the New York public school system. Roughly 10 percent of New York City's public school children are Muslims. And their parents are asking that schools close for the most sacred Muslim holidays. They argue that Christian and Jewish students get their most important holidays off already. Current New York Mayor Bill de Blasio endorsed the idea during his campaign. Take a listen.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAMPAIGN)

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Faith Matters
10:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

To Fight Extremism, Don't Alienate Troublemakers At The Mosque

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Education
10:58 am
Fri April 18, 2014

15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer?

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. This Sunday marks the 15th anniversary of the shootings at Columbine High School. That day, two students opened fire and killed 13 people.

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Code Switch
9:30 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Baseball's Demographic Shifts Bring Cultural Complexities

Cuban player Yasiel Puig has often been criticized for lacking discipline and for his "energetic" approach to the game. His fascinating journey to the U.S. was recently chronicled by LA Magazine and ESPN.
Scott Cunningham Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 12:32 pm

This week, baseball fans celebrated Jackie Robinson Day, 67 years after Robinson became the first black player to participate in a Major League Baseball game. Coincidentally (or not), the racial, ethnic and cultural dynamics of the sport today are the topics of much discussion in this week's news.

Decline In Percentage Of Black Players

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:31 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

The student population at D'Leisha Dent's high school, Central High in Tuscaloosa, Ala., is almost entirely African-American. Dent says she and her peers wish they had more opportunities to interact with white students.
Maisie Crow

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:10 am

The investigative journalism group ProPublica, with reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones, has just completed a yearlong project, Segregation Now, exploring the re-segregation of schools in the U.S., with a particular look at Tuscaloosa, Ala.

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Media
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Why Did Vanity Fair Give 'Belfies' A Stamp Of Approval?

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

"Selfie" may have been the 2013 word of the year. But "belfies," or "butt selfies" are now in the spotlight. We learn more about why they earned a fitness model a spread in Vanity Fair magazine.

Health Care
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

'Miserable' Doctors Prescribe A Different Career

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. It used to be that doctor was a profession many people aspired to - it brought prestige, money of course, a sense of purpose, bragging rights for your parents. But now a growing number of physicians say it's not really all it's cracked up to be.

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Education
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

You've Served Your Country, Now Get To Class

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This spring, we're joining our colleagues at NPR's Morning Edition to bring you stories that might help you navigate the higher education money maze. And today we want to talk about veterans.

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Politics
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Ohio's Law Against Political Lying Heads To Supreme Court

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

Can a state law prevent political campaigns from doling out misinformation? Guest host Celeste Headlee learns more from The Plain Dealer's Sabrina Eaton.

Law
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Do America's Deportation Policies Work?

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

Guest Host Celeste Headlee learns more about the United States' deportation policies from Muzaffar Chishti of the Migration Policy Institute.

Law
10:49 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Deported For An Old Crime, Jamaican Loses His American Dream

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:38 am

Howard Dean Bailey made a good life for himself in the U.S. But then, a decades-old run-in with the law led to his deportation. Does his story show the system failing or working?

Code Switch
6:03 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Autism, Like Race, Complicates Almost Everything

Alicia Montgomery walks with her son near their home.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 11:40 am

Children have tantrums. They yell and grab at things that they should ask for nicely. And when a child has autism, like my son, these episodes can be epic: toys hurled across a room, screaming fits that last hours, and flurries of hitting that get triggered by even a minor change in a routine.

But when my son screams at his therapist and tries to snatch Magic Markers from his hands, I gasp. I think of Trayvon Martin.

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Remembrances
11:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Remembering A Defiant, Soaring Performance By Marian Anderson

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, let's end the program on a high note. Today marks 75 years since Marian Anderson, the African-American contralto, took to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to sing.

Anderson was supposed to sing at the Daughters of the American Revolution Constitution Hall, but she was barred from performing there because she was black. Let's listen to a bit of Marian Anderson's performance from April 9, 1939.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

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Can I Just Tell You?
11:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Are Student Athletes Really Students Too?

Host Michel Martin asks whether college athletes are getting the education they are supposed to.

Economy
11:54 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Will Disclosing Employee Information Make Wages More Equal?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'd like to start the program today by talking about an issue that's been a hot topic on Capitol Hill lately. That issue is pay equity. The Democrats have been trying to push legislation through Congress to address what they say is a gender wage gap where women earn less than men for the same work. Yesterday, President Obama signed two orders aimed at closing that gap.

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Code Switch
1:45 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Coming Out In Basketball: How Brittney Griner Found 'A Place Of Peace'

Brittney Griner puts up a shot against Japan during a 2013 preseason WNBA game in Phoenix.
Christian Petersen Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:24 am

Brittney Griner is 23 years old, 6 feet 8 inches tall and one of the best female basketball players in the world. She was the WNBA top draft pick last year, and in college she set records for the most blocked shots in a season and the most career blocks in history — for male and female players. She's so good that the owner of a men's team — the Dallas Mavericks — has said he'd recruit her.

Now, Griner is also an author. She's co-written a new memoir, In My Skin, in which she describes being bullied and taunted as a kid for her height and athleticism.

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Code Switch
12:23 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

For Poetry Month, We're Taking To Twitter — And We Want Your Help

According to iStockphoto, these floating letters "symbolize the idea of literature." Sure. We'll just roll with that.
iStockphoto

Help us make poetry!

April is National Poetry Month: 30 days set aside for the celebration of all things verse. Many of us here at Code Switch love poetry every month of the year, but we can't always make space for it in our coverage.

So this month, we're taking advantage of the national celebration and highlighting great poets and poems that address issues of race, ethnicity and culture.

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Money Coach
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Prepaid Debit Cards Not As Simple As They Seem

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:49 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our money coach conversation. That's the part of the program where we talk about the economy and personal finance.

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Law
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Not Guilty Verdict Can Still Lead To Ruined Lives

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:49 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This year marks the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson's war on poverty. So throughout 2014, we're talking about what poverty looks like in American now. We're asking things like who is most likely to be poor today, and what affect does poverty have on people's lives? And we're hearing different ideas about solutions.

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#TMMPoetry: Muses and Metaphor
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Creating An Ecosystem In 140 Characters

Dennis Macdonald Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:36 pm

For Tell Me More's second week of Muses and Metpahor poet Holly Bass stopped by to talk about her teen writing initiative at a Washington, D.C. detention center. Bass has been working with her students to create poems that are 140-characters or less. She shared how she inspires them to navigate the sometimes difficult limitation.

"I tell them to just write a whole poem and then you can take one line or two lines from that poem and turn that into your Twitter poem" Bass told Tell Me More's Michel Martin.

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Parenting
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Vaccinating Children: Who Gets To Decide?

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:49 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

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My Big Break
11:36 am
Tue April 8, 2014

Ken Jeong, Leaving Medicine For Movies

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:49 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

You might have heard that some of our listeners actually joined Twitter just to participate in our Twitter poetry series. You might call it their big break into poetry. Well, our colleagues at All Things Considered have been hearing stories from a number of people about the moment when their careers in other fields took off.

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Code Switch
10:30 am
Tue April 8, 2014

It's Our Anniversary! Tell Us How We're Doing

Once again, we expect our impeccable use (and reuse!) of stock photos is clearly among your favorite aspects of Code Switch.
iStockphoto.com

One year ago today, Code Switch launched with the post "How Code-Switching Explains The World." Last June, we released our first Code Switch visitors survey to query our users about what they were seeing, what they liked, and what they liked less. We're long overdue for a follow-up.

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