Code Switch

Media
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

'New York Times' Upheaval: Is This A Barack Vs. Hillary Moment?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a good chunk of the rest of the day's program talking about issues in the media that all happen to bubble up at the same time. Later, we'll talk about why the new fall season just got more colorful. We'll hear about one show that puts an Asian-American family front and center in a network sitcom for the first time in 20 years.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:21 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Six Words: 'You've Got To Be Taught' Intolerance

Actors John Kerr and France Nuyen in a scene from the 1958 film South Pacific. The interracial romance between the onstage pair unsettled some audiences.
20th Century Fox Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often, NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Code Switch
11:24 am
Sun May 18, 2014

The American Story, As It Was Reported To The Rest Of The Nation

A display of America's first ethnic newspapers at the Newseum's new exhibit, "One Nation With News For All." The exhibit opened on May 16 and runs through Jan. 5, 2015.
Jonathan Thompson/Newseum

The first draft of American history has many authors.

And they include journalists from ethnic media: newspapers, websites, radio and TV stations dedicated to reporting news for immigrant and ethnic communities.

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Code Switch
4:28 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Mirror, Mirror: Does 'Fairest' Mean Most Beautiful Or Most White?

An 1852 illustration shows Snow White's evil stepmother gazing into her magic mirror. Her famous question includes an ambiguous word: "fairest."
Project Gutenberg

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 4:41 pm

Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who's the fairest of them all?

We all recognize the mantra of Snow White's evil stepmother. But what, exactly, is she asking? In the Grimm Brothers' German original, she asks who's the most beautiful in the land. But in English, it's a little more complicated.

On the one hand, fair is an archaic word for beautiful. But in modern usage, it usually refers to a light complexion – and it's hard to forget that we're talking about a story where the main character's claim to fame is that her skin is extraordinarily pale.

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Code Switch
4:46 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Nostalgia For What's Been Lost Since 'Brown V. Board'

This racially segregated Monroe Elementary School class from March 1953 shows Linda and Terry Lynn Brown, who, with their parents, initiated the Brown v. Board of Education case that helped propel school integration.
Carl Iwasaki Getty Image

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:41 pm

Brown v. Board of Education became the law of the land when it struck down de jure segregation in Topeka, Kan., on May 17, 1954, saying, "We conclude that, in the field of public education, the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate facilities are inherently unequal."

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Barbershop
11:11 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Is It Donald Sterling's Right To Fight For His Team?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:05 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Africa
11:11 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Wole Soyinka: I Just Want Those Monsters Exterminated

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:05 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. My thanks to Celeste Headlee for sitting in for me while I was away. And at the end of the program today, actually, I will have a word about her exciting new venture.

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Education
11:11 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Does It Matter if Schools Are Racially Integrated?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:05 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Let's turn now to a significant moment in the life of this nation. Tomorrow will mark 60 years since the day the Supreme Court issued its ruling in the landmark school desegregation case, Brown versus Board of Education. Advocates hoped the suit would level the playing field for all students, but it would take years of court orders, protests and, in some cases, the National Guard for some school districts to stop deliberate enforced segregation.

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Code Switch
2:39 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Before 'Brown V. Board,' Mendez Fought California's Segregated Schools

Sylvia Mendez was a young girl in the 1940s when her parents fought for Latinos to have access to white schools in the California court case Mendez v. Westminster. They won in 1947.
Shereen Marisol Meraji NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:51 pm

Sylvia Mendez says the only reason she wanted to go to an all-white school in California's Westminster District in the 1940s was because of its beautiful playground. The school that she and other Latino students were forced to attend didn't have monkey bars or swings.

"I was 9 years old," she says. "I just thought my parents wanted us to go to the nice-looking school."

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Code Switch
5:58 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

A Complicated First: A Black Editor Takes The Helm At The Gray Lady

The New York Times removed the first woman to ever hold its top editor post and replaced her with the first person of color to ever do so.
Mark Lennihan AP

When New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger removed Jill Abramson from the paper's executive editor spot on Wednesday, it stunned the media world. Abramson was the first woman to ever fill the paper's top post and was credited with helping right its fiscal ship, and much of the early coverage about just why she was pushed out centered on a possible dispute over her pay, which was less than her male predecessors' compensation.

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Code Switch
3:05 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

At A New Orleans High School, Marching Band Is A Lifeline For Kids

The Edna Karr High School marching band had fewer than 40 members four years ago. Today, more than 80 students march in the band.
Keith O'Brien NPR

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 2:31 pm

Editor's Note: This is a story about a high school band. It is a story that demands to be heard, even more so than read. Please click on the audio player, above, to listen. Audio will be available around 6:30 p.m. EDT.

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Wisdom Watch
11:37 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Oldest National Park Ranger Shares 'What Gets Remembered'

Betty Reid Soskin, 92, is the oldest active full-time National Park Service ranger in the United States. She and her colleagues at the Rosie the Riveter World War II Home Front National Historical Park are preparing to unveil new permanent exhibits at the park on May 24.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 1:26 pm

As 92-year-old Betty Reid Soskin helped hash out plans for a new national park 13 years ago, this is what stuck in her mind: "What gets remembered is a function of who's in the room doing the remembering."

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Code Switch
11:23 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Young People Want Equality But Struggle To Discuss Bias

These protesters rallied outside the Supreme Court in favor of affirmative action last fall, but MTV found that majorities of young people, across races, opposed racial preferences of any kind.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 1:53 pm

One oft-employed generalization about The Kids These Days is that they've grown up free from the legalized discrimination and racial neuroses of older generations, and they will live in a more multicultural world with less racism. But do we even know if that's true?

MTV, that reliable weather vane of popular youth culture, wanted to find out. It polled a nationally representative sample of people ages 14 to 24 about their views on bias and identity.

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Education
10:37 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Educating Girls: Big Payoff For $45 A Year

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 11:37 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Nigeria has been in the news a lot lately. That's since the militant Islamic organization Boko Haram kidnapped hundreds of schoolgirls on April 15. Professed to be against Western education, Boko Haram took the girls away from their books and their teachers and have threatened to sell them as wives and slaves.

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Music
10:36 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Breaking Up Helped Ledisi Find 'The Truth' In Her Music

Ledisi performs at the 2013 BET Honors awards. The singer has been nominated for eight Grammy awards over the past 10 years.
Kris Connor Getty Images for BET

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 11:37 am

Singer songwriter Ledisi has had eight Grammy nominations, and says she is grateful for that. "I would like to win, but it will happen when its time."

For more than 10 years, Ledisi has garnered an international fan base while striving to grow her musical abilities.

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Around the Nation
10:34 am
Thu May 15, 2014

The Pact That Turned A Juvenile Delinquent Into A Medical Doctor

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 11:37 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Our friends at All Things Considered have been collecting stories of moments when people's careers took off. It's called My Big Break.

They recently spoke to Dr. Sampson Davis who grew up in the rough parts of Newark, N.J. He talked about how doing a stint in juvie put his life in perspective.

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Can I Just Tell You?
10:33 am
Wed May 14, 2014

'Too Crisp And Self-Assured?' Take It As A Compliment, Ladies

Newscaster Barbara Walters prepares for her debut on ABC's evening news on October 4, 1976.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 11:41 am

A shout out to Barbara Walters on the occasion of her last official week on the air. Her Friday appearance on The View, the talk show she founded, is scheduled to be her last regular appearance on the air.

While we could certainly spend the next few minutes paying tribute to her for all the juicy scoops she has landed and all the glass ceilings she has busted, what I really want to do is point out what her life story has to do with another ongoing story — the plight of the kidnapped Nigerian girls whose ordeal enters its fourth week.

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U.S.
10:33 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Black, Gay And Scared Of Sex

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 11:39 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
10:33 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Jay Z Has Another Problem To Add To His 99

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:25 am

Social media is still buzzing about the video of Beyonce's younger sister Solange attacking Jay Z while leaving a party. But is it any of our business? The Beauty Shop ladies weigh in.

Politics
10:33 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Sen. Scott: Democrats Too Focused On Symptoms Of Poverty?

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 11:39 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Code Switch
2:44 am
Wed May 14, 2014

New Orleans Police Hope To 'Win The City Back,' One Kid At A Time

New Orleans police investigate a shooting in February. Though the city's murder rate is down for a second straight year, it's still high compared with other cities.
Michael DeMocker The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 8:25 am

New Orleans is making progress toward losing the "murder capital" label. For a second straight year, homicides declined in the city, in keeping with a nationwide trend.

For African-Americans in the city, though, the numbers are less comforting. Of the nearly 350 killings in the past two years, 91 percent of the victims have been black. It's a cycle that's worrisome to the city's African-American community — and law enforcement.

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Code Switch
4:33 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

You'll Be Seeing More Asian-Americans On Network TV This Fall

John Cho and Karen Gillan star in Selfie, an ABC comedy that will roll out this fall.
Eric McCandless ABC

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 6:36 pm

Back in the '90s, comedian Margaret Cho starred in a little-loved, short-lived sitcom called All-American Girl. It was the first and only network sitcom to feature an Asian-American family (a fictional Korean-American family, in fact). It was pretty bland, and to the chagrin of many critics, the characters were painted with very broad strokes.

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Parenting
10:21 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Parents Draw The Line On Teen Relationships And Social Media

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 12:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Money Coach
10:19 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Here's How You Protect Your Kids From Identity Theft

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 3:58 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to turn now to personal finance. We've been hearing a lot about identity theft in recent years. Law enforcement says it's one of the fastest growing crimes, and it can have serious repercussions. Victims of identity theft have often been denied credit they deserve and even jobs, not to mention the hours of time spent writing letters and making telephone calls to clean up the mess.

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Education
10:19 am
Tue May 13, 2014

What Drives Protests On Campus?

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 12:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. It's commencement season. You might be headed to one this weekend. And while you're probably most concerned with seeing your loved one get that piece of paper, these days many students and faculty are showing new interest in who offers those often banal but still widely noted commencement remarks.

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Law
10:19 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Gay Marriage Around The Country: Not All Judges Say 'I Do'

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 12:10 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Same-sex marriage is back in the headlines this week. In Arkansas, gay and lesbian couples are lining up for marriage licenses after a state judge struck down its ban. Today in Virginia, a federal appeals court is hearing a challenge to the Commonwealth's ban on same-sex marriage. But these are just two of many cases winding through the courts across the country.

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Code Switch
6:03 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Race Alone Doesn't Explain Hatred Of Obama, But It's Part Of The Mix

President Obama speaks at a news briefing in July about the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 11:31 am

It's a fact of American life that a good share of the electorate is disappointed, disapproving and even disdainful of President Obama. What's less certain are the reasons why.

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Code Switch
6:58 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Out Of Maryland, A Cry For Nigeria: 'Bring Back Our Girls!'

In Bowie, Md., girls raise their signs in protest of the Nigerian government's fruitless search efforts, and in solidarity with the schoolgirls still missing.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 7:26 pm

It has been four weeks since more than 250 Nigerian schoolgirls were abducted from their boarding school. In that month, search efforts for the girls have been largely fruitless, even as media outlets continue to spread their story. It's caught the attention of communities around the world, including many Nigerian-Americans living in the U.S.

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Code Switch
6:39 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Donald Sterling Says He Isn't A Racist. Is Anyone?

Donald Sterling, the owner of the NBA's Los Angeles Clippers, might be forced by the league's owners to sell his franchise.
Mark J. Terrill ASSOCIATED PRESS

Last week, I was having a conversation with a woman who said that her father was distrustful of people of other races. When I asked her if she considered her father a racist, she balked at the premise of the question. When I think of a racist, I think of the worst kind of person, she said. And anyway, she said, her father didn't like anybody.

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Books
11:07 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Congressman Clyburn Reflects On A Life Of 'Blessed Experiences'

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 11:24 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. If you follow politics at all, then you probably know that Congressman James Clyburn is one of the most powerful people on Capitol Hill. The South Carolina native first elected in 1992 is now the third-ranking Democrat serving in the House, known both for his Southern charm and for his willingness to fight hard when he thinks the occasion warrants.

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